It's Snowing In Atlanta, Sound The Alarm!

It's Snowing In Atlanta, Sound The Alarm!

It only takes an inch of snow for Atlanta to shut down. But, it's more serious than funny.
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We kick off a 'spring' semester here in Atlanta with a snow day! Classes are canceled for two days and temperatures are dropping to 17 degrees Fahrenheit. We only got an inch of snow, but it just takes an inch for all of Atlanta to shut down.

When it snows in Atlanta, flights are canceled, schools, transportation, and establishments shut down, and people find themselves abandoning their cars in the middle of the road.

If you are up north still recovering from the bomb cyclone, thinking, "Atlanta clearly cannot handle the cold weather", you are one hundred percent correct. But before you begin to mock us for melting down over a few frozen flakes. Keep in mind,

Atlanta does not get snow every day. In fact, we hardly get it every year.

Atlanta was never meant to get this cold. But global warming is surprising the world constantly with record-breaking hurricanes, cyclones, and unexpected snowflakes.

It takes a lot of money and effort to make sure snow doesn't affect the works of a metropolitan area.

The biggest problem with snow days is slippery transportation. When roads and runways ice over they are impossible to maneuver on. Thus up north, cities spread salt to reduce the melting point of the ice and allowing the streets to clear up. However, salt is only effective if kept dry. Northern cities spend a hefty price on storage facilities to keep tons of salt ready for use. Unfortunately, these are measures that Atlanta cannot afford to take just on an off chance that it may or may not snow an inch for one day. Instead, we use sand to add traction to the ice on roads. Sand is much cheaper than salt, but despite good intention, traction is lost after 10 to 15 cars drive over.

With slippery roads, accidents are bound to happen. And roads are essential for transportation and a running city. Classes canceled? Probably because your professor cannot drive to school. Can't catch your bus today? Definitely, because you don't want your bus slipping and risking the lives of the passengers and driver.

Another big problem with snow in Atlanta is the traffic. Traffic is always a problem in Atlanta, but when it snows everyone is trying to go home and it gets even worse. So the first 'snow storm' of 2018, made some traffic standstill, preventing trucks hauling sand and salt from treating roads.

Our mayor, Kasim Reed, stated that rather than allowing everyone leave at once, they should have been staggered to avoid traffic jams; schools first, then private sector, then the government facilities. But in the end, Atlanta just simply does not have enough experience with snow to know what to do on such special days.

I know it may seem ridiculous, that one of the biggest cities in the U.S. can be defeated by a little snowfall. But in the end, it is always better to be safe than sorry.

Cover Image Credit: Instagram

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High School Summer Vs. College Summer

Summer isn't all fun and games anymore.
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Summer: the most wonderful time of the year. School’s out, obligations are at an all-time low, and life is simple. The only problem - I’m not in high school anymore. This naïve cupcake phase of life is now over, thanks to you, college. Now, free time is a foreign concept to myself along with my peers; summer's not all fun and games as it was in previous years.

School’s out? Ha, you THOUGHT.

What time is it? Summer (school) time! When the final bell rang on the last day of high school, we all jumped for joy and anticipated summer’s freedom filled with the luxurious free time that displaces class time. When you finished your last final in college, you might as well buy class materials for your nearly approaching summer semester. Unlike the good old high school days, summer marks the start for even more time to incorporate school: particularly, summer school. Here lie students who are retaking failed courses and/or those who are behind on classes and need to get ahead. School’s out, scream and shout? You got it all wrong, High School Musical.

Time to intern!

Not only is summer “break” a good time to take some extra classes, but it’s also a perfect time to intern. That’s right, no sleeping in ‘til noon! Don’t forget to set those alarms because college students have to be up and running to gain work experience for their future careers. College students sometimes even endure these long days without any pay, but you gotta do what you gotta do to lock in a post-college job at that ideal company. High school students: props to you if you intern over the summer, I just see it more often among college kids.

Work, work, work.

I had a summer job in high school, but I didn’t work nearly as much as I do now as a college student. Summer is the optimal time to stack up on dollar bills in your savings account. You need money for those ridiculously pricey textbooks (opened quite less often than you’d think), groceries, housing, spending money, and other miscellaneous college expenses. Yeah, you can always work doing the school year, but juggling that along with classes, extracurricular activities, and an eventful social life can be pretty exhausting. Also, it can deter you from getting decent grades (which is why you're in college in the first place).

Vacation? More like no-cation.

Ah, do I miss those summers where I’d be at the beach for weeks on end. With summer classes, a job, and an internship, vacation is just time I no longer have. You can’t just request time off from class, internships, and work! Other (and more important) matters demand your time and effort. If you're lucky, a quick, cheap weekend getaway is you're best bet.

Cover Image Credit: MediaCache

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You're Not Crazy, Your Seasonal Allergies ARE Worse Than They Normally Are

Between all of these symptoms, I've felt miserable the last week.

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We've all been waiting for summer to come, and it's finally on its way. I started putting away my jackets and heavy clothes, and I'm so excited to take out my dresses and bathing suits. Classes are ending for students and we can start the beach trips on these warm, sunny days. What could possibly be wrong with summer coming?

If you have seasonal allergies, specifically to pollen and tree-related allergens, you may be in for a real problem.

In certain states, especially in the northern and eastern US areas, the pollen count is at drastically high levels. So much so that people with only minimal seasonal allergies are having intense reactions, and people who didn't even know they had allergies are having their first reactions.

I've only ever had an itchy nose when seasons change, and only when standing in the middle of lots of plants that would aggravate it. I never suspected my allergies would be making me so sick right now until my physician told me what's going on with this season's allergens.

Since the pollen levels are so dramatic in New York right now, I've had sinus congestion so bad it turned into sinusitis, and a sore throat so swollen and painful I swore it had to be strep. The sinusitis was giving me fevers, aches, and chills, making me feel like I had the flu — all of this traced back to allergies. Between all of these symptoms, I've felt miserable the last week.

Once I started asking around about what my doctor said, several people have told me they're having the same problem with their allergies now. If you're suspicious you may have allergies, get tested and ask your doctor's opinion. It's best to be well-informed on your medical issues so that you'll be prepared if a bad allergy season comes along (like this summer).

If you want to know what the pollen count looks like in your area, go to Pollen.com and allow access to your location — it'll show you a map of the states and their current pollen levels, as well as a specific analysis of the town you live.

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