Self care is easy

self-care isn’t Just bath bombs and face masks

Self-care is simpler than you think.

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What's first comes to mind when you hear the words "self-care"? If it's photos of glamorous celebrities, showing off their fluffy white robes, while wearing a face mask and holding an expensive bath bomb, you're not alone.

Recently, self-care has become so trendy that posting videos of your bath bomb dissolving into water or showing off your freaky new face mask look receives praise and increases your social media likes exponentially.

It's hard not to feel slightly deflated if you're unable to practice self-care in a way that's been so glorified and saturated all over social media. To start, self-care doesn't have to be expensive, and if the price stresses you out, it's doing the opposite of its intention. There are a lot of different ways that you can take care of yourself and are little self-care practices that you can do every day that aren't quite as glamorous or Instagramable. And that's okay.

Self-care has helped me do more than simply exist in the chaos that is NYC and life as a full-time graduate student. I want to emphasize that like many other skills, self-care is a practice and takes time to get the hang of, and therefore it is important not to be too hard on yourself while you're just starting out.

Self-care looks different for everyone. It's about nourishing yourself throughout the day—both physically and emotionally. This helps me feel less burnt out, more energized, and more able to do everything that I need to do. I often feel anxious, drained, and irritable when I haven't engaged in enough self-care. In these times, it's glaringly obvious to me that I need to make myself more of a priority and slow down, even just briefly.

As someone who struggles with mental health, it is important that I prioritize my well-being and take care of myself. I've done the "too busy to slow down, never stop, never take care of yourself" thing before, and spoiler alert-- it doesn't end well. By not actively engaging in self-care, I'm passively hurting my mental health.

There are a number of simple things I do for self-care that do wonders for me. This means remembering to take my medication every day, morning and evening, even when I'm in a rush. It means that I always make sure I'm eating consistently throughout the day and that I drink lots of water. It means that sometimes I need to say "no" to plans so that I have time to rest and recharge. It also means setting boundaries in my relationships and working on my communication with others. And sometimes, it can be as simple as taking extra time when I get home at night to take off my makeup with a face wash that smells good instead of using a makeup wipe.

I encourage you to find a self-care routine that not only feels accessible and simple to do but something that's unique to you. That could mean that you decide to spend a little extra time in the morning making yourself a cup of tea and reading or going for a run, or painting. The point is, self-care is necessary and unique to each individual person. I've noticed that my mental health has improved and I've felt happier as I engage in self-care. It takes time to find the right balance, and again, that's okay, but you'll never know what will work and make you feel great if you don't try. It's important that we take care of ourselves for all of the time that we have here in this world.

Cover Image Credit:

Pexel

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PSA: Keep Your Body-Negative Opinions Away From Little Girls This Summer

But our own baggage shouldn't be shoved on to those we surround ourselves with.

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It's officially swimsuit season, y'all.

The temperature is rising, the sun is bright and shining, and a trip to the beach couldn't look more appealing than it does right now. This is the time of year that many of us have been rather impatiently waiting for. It's also the time of year that a lot of us feel our most self-conscious.

I could take the time to remind you that every body is a bikini body. I could type out how everyone is stunning in their own unique way and that no one should feel the need to conform to a certain standard of beauty to feel beautiful, male or female. I could sit here and tell you that the measurement of your waistline is not a reflection of your worth. I completely believe every single one of these things.

Hell, I've shared these exact thoughts more times than I can count. This time around, however, I'm not going to say all these things. Instead, I'm begging you to push your insecurities to the side and fake some confidence in yourself when you're in front of others.

Why?

Because our negative self-image is toxic and contagious and we're spreading this negative thinking on to others.

We're all guilty of this, we're with family or a friend and we make a nasty comment about some aspect of our appearance, not even giving a single thought to the impact our words have on the person with us. You might think that it shouldn't bother them- after all, we're not saying anything bad about them! We're just expressing our feelings about something we dislike about ourselves. While I agree that having conversations about our insecurities and feelings are important for our mental and emotional health, there is a proper and improper way of doing it. An open conversation can leave room for growth, acceptance, understanding, and healing. Making a rude or disheartening remark about yourself is destructive not only to yourself, but it will make the person you are saying these things around question their own self worth or body image by comparing themselves to you.

My little sister thinks she's "fat." She doesn't like how she looks. To use her own words, she thinks she's "too chubby" and that she "looks bad in everything."

She's 12 years old.

Do you want to know why she has this mindset? As her older sister, I failed in leading her by example. There were plenty of times when I was slightly younger, less sure of myself, and far more self-conscious than I am now, that I would look in the mirror and say that I looked too chubby, that my body didn't look good enough, that I wished I could change the size of my legs or stomach.

My little sister had to see the older sibling she looks up to, the big sis she thinks always looks beautiful, say awful and untrue things about herself because her own sense of body image was warped by media, puberty, and comparing herself to others.

My negativity rubbed off onto her and shaped how she looks at herself. I can just imagine her watching me fret over how I look thinking, "If she thinks she's too big, what does that make me?"

It makes me feel sick.

All of us are dealing with our own insecurities. It takes some of us longer than others to view ourselves in a positive, loving light. We're all working on ourselves every day, whether it be mentally, physically, or emotionally. But our own baggage shouldn't be shoved on to those we surround ourselves with, our struggles and insecurities should not form into their own burdens.

Work on yourself in private. Speak kindly of yourself in front of others. Let your positivity, real or not, spread to others instead of the bad feelings we have a bad habit of letting loose.

The little girls of the world don't need your or my negative self-image this summer. Another kid doesn't need to feel worthless because we couldn't be a little more loving to ourselves and a lot more conscious of what we say out loud.

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10 Bathing Suits Girls Without Boyfriends Should Wear On The Beach

Check these out.

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Any fucking bathing suit they want, duhhh.

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