Apologizing Doesn't Make Using The N-Word OK

I Don't Want Your Apology For Saying The N-Word, I Want You To Stop Saying It

Are you actually sorry for your actions or is it just normal to apologize?

Hannah DeHart
633

The word sorry just doesn't hold as much meaning as it used to me feel like.

When we were younger we used to apologize for hitting another kid or if you knocked down a kid at recess. One of the definitions for sorry was "feeling distressed, especially through sympathy with someone else's misfortune." The other definition they had stated "feeling regret or penitence."

I don't know about you guys but I have been one to apologize a lot, heck I even say sorry when I don't notice someone behind me when the door closes behind me. Now we're going to turn the tables BIG time and how when people think it's OK to say the N-word jokingly and then notice I am in the room and apologize.

Heck yes, we are going to talk about this.

When apologizing to someone to you truly mean it or do you just say it because you're used to immediately apologizing because that is the normal thing to do? If you were truly apologizing you'd give reason to it, but people just say sorry to get out of an argument or even avoid one. If you think someone is mad at you, you don't even bother really asking what happened you just apologized to avoid the confrontation.

Call me crazy but sometimes some good old confrontation is just what the doctor ordered. You could be having all these pent-up feelings and emotions that sorry just won't patch up. Even if it does patch them up, imagine that it's a bandage and you just got in the shower, now the bandage is useless and to me that how I see the word sorry!

That is personally just me because people have apologized (including myself) and saying sorry really isn't crap anymore. I have got to the point where people say sorry I say, "you really aren't sorry." Depending on the situation if you were sorry you would not have done whatever it is in the first place.

Now, if that isn't a hard pill to swallow, then I don't know what is.

Now if you are apologizing to someone for their misfortune that is an entire different situation in which the sorry could be sincere, which I hope it is and you are being a heartless witch and if you are, then you need to step back and get it together because at that point you're being rude and shouldn't be around that person, to begin with.

Now, the "N" word. Let's get awkward, shall we? People say a lot "Oh, I would never say that around you." Keywords there you guys is "around you." PLEASE tell me why you wouldn't say it around me? Oh, I know why, because you don't want to hurt my feelings right? Exactly my point. You won't say the word around me but you have your group messages named things like "My N****s" or something like that, am I right? I know I'm right because I've seen it. People have shown me their phones and a group message will pop up on their phone or their Snapchat and I will see it and they will say sorry.

No, if you were sorry you wouldn't have named the group chat that.

You are apologizing because you ASSUME that I'll go off on you or you hurt my feelings. The N-word came from the eighth century as an adaptation of the Spanish "negro." By the mid-20th century, it was used as an unambiguously racist insult. Basically, the entire point of this is that it is DISRESPECTFUL. Even when you say "Oh, my black friend so-and-so" like yes, I am black, thanks for telling me as if I didn't know? I find it very funny that people are SO quick to defend their friends of color when someone else might call them or use the N-word but are even quicker to use it when they aren't around. Being black already makes us stand out enough we don't need people calling us racial slurs on top of it. We have names, try using them once in a while and stop apologizing for things you aren't sorry for.

The whole point of this was to show you what "sorry" can really mean or not mean in some circumstances.

Next time you think something might hurt someone, take a look in the mirror and try to put them in your shoes. This is something we all need to practice. I find myself saying sorry for things that I don't really think about much either.

"If you have no critics you'll likely have no success" — Malcolm X
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