My Roommate Dressed Me For A Week, And I Have Thoughts

My Roommate Dressed Me For A Week, And I Have Thoughts

Find you a roomie that will go through your closet to pick out your clothes for five days in a row.

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Since I'm a college student, I don't see a point in putting effort into choosing my outfit each day. My go-to outfit is a sweatshirt with ripped jeans and converse. Sometimes I'll wear a nice shirt with a cardigan, but that is rare.

So, when I was going through what I wanted to take back home (since I didn't wear them), I asked for my roommate's approval and she selected a handful of shirts to keep. Since I had gotten rid of half of my clothes, she thought it was a good idea for her to decide what I should wear since I wouldn't do it on my own. Not only was she right, but she actually did it.

For this challenge, I was able to pick out my undergarments, socks, and shoes. My roommate chose my shirt, pants, and accessories.

Monday

Christina Stover

Starting the week off, my roommate went with a nice sweater and jeans. I really like the sweater, I just haven't worn it since winter break. Within the first five minutes at my 8 a.m. class, I received a compliment. I thanked them and told her all about how she was picking out my clothes for the week. She laughed and thought that was funny. The sweater was a bit warm, but it was still nice to wear something that I usually wouldn't and get noticed for wearing something different.

Tuesday

Christina Stover

Tuesday was similar to Monday in the sense of a sweater and jeans. I got the sweater for Christmas a few years ago, and it really seems like the kind of thing to wear to church instead of a casual weekday outfit. I really love floral patterns, so I was instantly drawn to this sweater. It makes me feel like a confident adult and that is definitely appreciated. She also picked out the baby blue raindrop necklace in the picture, and it really complimented the darker colors in the sweater. And I wore a pair of jeans that didn't have rips in them for the first time in months.

Wednesday

Christina Stover

A little fancier on this hump day. Wearing a cute dark green shirt with a little knot at the bottom, a cardigan because it's short sleeves and casual leggings. The necklace is an outline of the world's continents. I definitely felt a lot dressier in this outfit as opposed to jeans and sweatshirts. My signature half-up-half-down hairdo pulled the whole outfit together. Again, this is something I would wear to church and not to class. But I think this also helped my confidence and allowed me to come out of my shell a little, which is always a good thing.

Thursday

Christina Stover

Wearing a crop top in winter is always a power move. I really loved this outfit because not only did it color coordinate, but it was super cute. I had an interview earlier this morning, so I had mascara on, and it made my eyes pop, which was great. And the Army-green button-up shirt really brought the whole outfit together. The shirt says, "Crazy plant lady." Which is exhibited by the pictures of plants on the shirt and the cactus and succulent tapestry in the background. I thought this was one of my favorite outfits, plus I always love an excuse to wear leggings.

Friday

Christina Stover

Today, she gave me a little break. I spent the weekend at home, and she gave me a simple long-sleeve that says "Bowling Green" on the back with a huge mandala design, and the iconic ripped jeans. I had an interview this day as well, so my makeup is done again, and I wore a translucent teardrop necklace. The outfit was comfortable and practical for a day of running errands and spending time with family. It has been a while since I've worn this shirt, as well, so I enjoyed spicing things up with such a bright shirt.

Overall, I think this was a fun and exciting little experiment. What started as an assumed joke, turned into a learning experience about myself and my clothing options. I'm not saying that I won't be wearing sweatshirts frequently, but I am saying that it's nice to have options for fancier outfits. Each day we would have a little photo shoot that was funny and extra, but another fun perk of doing this experiment.

Now, in order for this to come full circle, I need to go through her closet and pick out her clothes for a week. That's definitely something for me to look forward to.

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To The Grandmothers Who Made Us The Women We Are Today

Sincerely, the loving granddaughters.
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The relationship between a grandmother and her granddaughter is something so uniquely special and something to be treasured forever.

Your grandma loves you like you are her own daughter and adores you no matter what. She is the first person you run to when you have a problem with your parents and she never fails to grace you with the most comforting advice.

She may be guilty of spoiling you rotten but still makes sure to stress the importance of being thankful and kind.

Your grandma has most likely lived through every obstacle that you are experiencing now as a young adult and always knows just exactly what to say.

She grew up in another generation where things were probably much harder for young women than they are today.

She is a walking example of perseverance, strength, and grace who you aim to be like someday.

Your grandma teaches you the lessons she had to learn the hard way because she does not want you to make the same mistakes she did when she was growing up.

Her hugs never fail to warm your heart, her smile never fails to make you smile, and her laugh never fails to brighten your day.

She inspires you to be the best version of yourself that you can be.

You only hope that one day you can be the mother and grandmother she was to you.

A piece of girl’s heart will forever belong to her grandma that no one could ever replace.

She is the matriarch of your family and is the glue that holds you all together.

Grandmothers play such an important role in helping their granddaughters to grow into strong, intelligent, kind women.

She teaches you how to love and how to forgive.

Without the unconditional love of your grandma, you would not be the woman you are today.

To all of the grandmothers out there, thank you for being you.

Sincerely,

the loving granddaughters

Cover Image Credit: Carlie Konuch

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Gucci’s Commodification Of Cultural Clothing Is A Problem The Fashion Industry Needs To Address

Brands like Gucci and Zara are only commodifying the culture of others rather than making any attempt to celebrate and respect them.

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Recently, Gucci faced backlash for selling Sikh turbans as hats for $790. The brand had already come under fire when the turbans were featured in Gucci's Fall 2018 show, especially due to Gucci's use of white models to wear the turbans on the runway. It seems that the previous backlash has not discouraged Gucci from continuing on to sell the turbans for a high price.

Members of the Sikh community were quick to express outrage at the monetization of the turbans, pointing out the religious significance of the Sikh turban. The reduction of the turban to a mere accessory for fashion is offensive enough on its own, but selling them at such a high price only further commodifies an item that is considered sacred to many and would normally not cost nearly as much in the Sikh community.

This incident with Gucci, however, is far from being the only instance where a cultural item has been monetized in the fashion industry. Many have also questioned Zara's new sandals, which bear a close resemblance to waraji, woven straw sandals that were once popular among common people in Japan. The main source of confusion among members of the Japanese community was the price of the sandals, which are being sold at 7,990 yen ($72) while waraji are usually only 200-300 yen (about $2-$3).

Waraji do not appear to have the same spiritual significance as the Sikh turban, but both Gucci's and Zara's attempts to sell these items for much higher prices are all-too-common examples of cultural appropriation. Even if the item does not have sacred or religious value, it is still something that belongs to another culture and should not be monetized in such a manner. Drawing inspiration from other cultures is not harmful on its own if done respectfully, but simply borrowing cultural items and selling them as luxury items at a higher price range is far from being respectful. In these instances, these items are passed off "better" than the original by a brand that does not come from the culture it is borrowing from. Zara should not be given more credit than the people of Japan who used to wear waraji. In the case of Gucci, the turban should not have been touched at all.

The monetization of other cultures is, unfortunately, far too common, especially in the fashion industry. Brands like Gucci and Zara are only commodifying the culture of others rather than making any attempt to celebrate and respect them. Hiking up the prices of items belonging to another culture is a glaringly obvious act of cultural appropriation and a trend that needs to stop.

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