Resisting Rest

Resisting Rest

Emmy Award-winning Short Film.

This short film won the award for the Long Form Fiction category at the High School Production Awards, or Southeast Emmys, an annual event run by NATAS.

"Resisting Rest" tells the story of a workaholic teenager who participates in a scientific experiment to prolong human’s ability to go without sleep. Teenagers often go without several hours of sleep to do their assignments, and this is hurting their quality of life.

Crew:

Directed and edited by Griffin Larson

Written by Griffin Larson & Andrew Bourne

Starring Caylynn Palmer

Produced and cinematography by Andrew Bourne

Co-Starring Bella Sci and Hannah Collins

Audio Operator Jose Amaro

Assistant Editor Andrew Bourne

Special thanks to David Bourne, Shannon Palmer, Ashley Boyle, The Larson Family, The Palmer Family, The Bourne Family, and Lisa Funderburk

Cover Image Credit: Andrew Bourne

To The Girl Struggling With Her Body Image

It's not about the size of your jeans, but the size of your heart, soul, and spirit.

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To the girl struggling with her body image,

You are more than the number on the scale. You are more than the number on your jeans and dresses. You are way more than the number of pounds you've gained or lost in whatever amount of time.

Weight is defined as the quantity of matter contained by a body or object. Weight does not define your self-worth, ambition or potential.

So many girls strive for validation through the various numbers associated with body image and it's really so sad seeing such beautiful, incredible women become discouraged over a few numbers that don't measure anything of true significance.

Yes, it is important to live a healthy lifestyle. Yes, it is important to take care of yourself. However, taking care of yourself includes your mental health as well. Neglecting either your mental or physical health will inflict problems on the other. It's very easy to get caught up in the idea that you're too heavy or too thin, which results in you possibly mistreating your body in some way.

Your body is your special, beautiful temple. It harbors all of your thoughts, feelings, characteristics, and ideas. Without it, you wouldn't be you. If you so wish to change it in a healthy way, then, by all means, go ahead. With that being said, don't make changes to impress or please someone else. You are the only person who is in charge of your body. No one else has the right to tell you whether or not your body is good enough. If you don't satisfy their standards, then you don't need that sort of negative influence in your life. That sort of manipulation and control is extremely unhealthy in its own regard.

Do not hold back on things you love or want to do because of how you interpret your body. You are enough. You are more than enough. You are more than your exterior. You are your inner being, your spirit. A smile and confidence are the most beautiful things you can wear.

It's not about the size of your jeans. It's about the size of your mind and heart. Embrace your body, observe and adore every curve, bone and stretch mark. Wear what makes you feel happy and comfortable in your own skin. Do your hair and makeup (or don't do either) to your heart's desire. Wear the crop top you've been eyeing up in that store window. Want a bikini body? Put a bikini on your body, simple.

So, as hard as it may seem sometimes, understand that the number on the scale doesn't measure the amount or significance of your contributions to this world. Just because that dress doesn't fit you like you had hoped doesn't mean that you're any less of a person.

Love your body, and your body will love you right back.

Cover Image Credit: Lauren Margliotti

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Narcan Trainings Should Be Just As Required As CPR Trainings, EVERY Human Has The Right To Survive

A life is a life, whether they're an addict or not.

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More than 63,600 people died of a drug overdose in 2016 and roughly two-thirds of these deaths were caused by opioids, killing more people than car accidents, guns, or breast cancer. The opioid epidemic is in full swing and no one is immune to the damage being caused by it — not celebrities, not young people, not anyone. At a time when our life expectancy is falling for the first time since the 60s and a fifth of all deaths among Americans aged 24 to 35 are due to opioids, it has never been more necessary to get life-saving means into the hands of individuals everywhere.

Luckily, these kinds of life-saving means do exist. Naloxone, more commonly known as Narcan, is a medication designed to rapidly reverse an opioid overdose by binding to opioid receptors and reversing and blocking the effects of other opioids, often available in either a nasal spray or injection. Trainings are usually free and pop up in most communities every month or so. From 1996 to 2014, at least 26,500 opioid overdoses in the U.S. were reversed by laypersons using Narcan and Narcan prescriptions filled at U.S. pharmacies increased 1170% between 2013 and 2015.

The potential is incredible. Unfortunately, it's not necessarily being reached. Most laypersons are not Narcan trained, either because they don't know what it is or they don't think they'll ever be around someone who overdoses. But just like we get CPR trained just in case something ever happens, we should all be getting Narcan trained, as well. While most of us probably don't think we'll ever end up in that situation, it happens. And it can mean the difference between life and death.

As Dr. Stephen Jones, a researcher with the CDC says, "In order for [Narcan] to be most effective, we need to get it into the hands of people who are most likely to be on the scene of an overdose." That's why initiatives that bring Narcan to people who use themselves are so important. No one wants their friend to die. But the truth is, no community is untouched by this epidemic. The more people we get Narcan trained, the fewer people we will see die from something absolutely preventable. And the more people will have a chance to recover and get their lives back.

A lot of jobs require CPR training, and a lot of companies arrange for a day of training so their employees can learn how to intervene in an emergency situation. Narcan training should be just required. A life is a life, whether they're an addict or not.

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