This Is The Story Of A Football Friday Night Farm Town

This Is The Story Of A Football Friday Night Farm Town

Football and farming are what your town is all about, it's just a lifestyle.
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Farmin' and football are what your small town is all about. Monday at school and work, that's what everyone is talking about. It's on the radio, in the newspaper, and posted on every hometown store window. The local Mcdonalds has the team's record spelled out on their billboard, the local car dealer hands out little footballs with the team logo on it throughout the week, and everyone has a tee-shirt. The town is close-knit, we're a big family.

Throughout the week we go to school, then to practice and to other activities. FFA chapter meeting, volunteering at the local homeless shelter, getting the bare minimum in when it comes to studying and school work. Last stop is the family farm to take care of the animals and then home for the night.

During the week we're focused on taking care of our animals for the summer county fair, hanging out with our friends, and finding something to do in our little town filled with corn and beans.

SEE ALSO: A Thank You To Livestock, And A Thank You To 4-H

Thursday comes and everyone is talking about who they're bringing, what they're wearing and the opposing team. After school and work, everyone goes home to prepare for the next day.

Friday at school comes and you hear your principal on the announcements say "It's football Friday night, London against West Jeff rivalry game." Everyone is talking about how we're going to beat our rivals. Class doesn't matter on Friday's when we have a football game, we're all too worried about going out to support and cheer on "our boys."

Next thing you know there are 15 minutes left of school and the principal gets back on the announcements to call everyone out into the hallway. The band marches the halls along with the cheerleaders and football players, yearbook staff is snapping pictures and the entire high school is singing the fight song. The bell rings and we race out to our cars and trucks, blaring music as we pull out of the school.

First to Walmart to get a few extra bottles of face paint, beads to match the theme, and whatever other accessories we feel are necessary. Next, we all meet up at a friends house to get ready. We do each other's hair and makeup, paint each other's faces and reassure each other that our outfits look okay.

Now to the game.

We carpool to the game, blaring our favorite music all the way there. Wait in the line that the rest of the town is waiting in to get their tickets, and then go straight to the student section.

“Seniors in the front! Then it goes juniors, sophomores, and freshman all the way in the back! Don’t screw it up!” -Senior student section leader

The kick-off cheering begins — “ohhhhh” — and the ball is punted. The crowd gets loud, everyone is yelling, the cheerleaders are leading chants, the coaches are yelling, the photographers are snapping pictures, and in that moment everything seems perfect.

You’re a high school senior, you’ve worked your whole life to lead the student section or stand on the front row. You never want to leave this moment. You want to live in it forever and never let it go. The entire town is one big family and you are just now realizing it.

After the game, we all meet up at the hometown pizza place or waffle house to celebrate the win.

That’s the story of a football Friday night farm town.

Cover Image Credit: Macey Joe Mullins

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10 Things You'll Recognize If You Grew Up In A Small Town

Those stop signs were more like suggestions.
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Whether you're from the Northwest or Southeast, all small towns share basically the same characteristics.

From hanging out at car washes to eating endless meals at that Mexican restaurant, if you're from a small town, you'll probably relate to one (if not all) of these things:

1. Yes, that Mexican restaurant.

Whether you came here to eat after ball games or simply came because there was nothing better to do, you probably spent way to much money on burritos and cheese dip. (For real though, cheese dip was so worth that extra $3).

2. Churches. Churches everywhere.

There seemed to be more churches than people, and everywhere you went one of them was staring you in the face. At least you knew that the whole town was covered on seats when it came to Sunday services.

3. Yep, you hung out at the car wash.

For some odd reason, teenagers like to hang out at the car wash. We don't know why we did, we just did. No car every got cleaned. We just sat on our hoods or tailgates and talked or listened the music. What a wild night.

4. Quick stops.

Gas stations were called quick stops and thank God for those quick stops. You could fill up your tank and get a snack without having to drive 30 minutes to the nearest city. Plus their boiled peanuts were always the bomb. #blessed

5. "Stop" signs.

Those stop signs were more like suggestions. No cop, no stop, right? Same thing with speed limits - merely suggestions.

6. The football field.

Fall Friday nights were made for football games, and there was no getting out of it. Do any of you small town girls really remember going on a Friday night date? Yeah, me neither. Football games were the closest you were going to get to a date on Fridays. You either waited for Saturday or the end of the season. Honestly though, those Friday nights hold some of you and your friends' favorite memories.

7. The good ole grocery store.

Sorry bud, Walmart, Costo, and Kroger were 30 minutes away, and driving to the city was not about to happen. You either went to Shop and Save or Piggly Wiggly for your groceries.

8. "The park."

You either played as a kid, coached a peewee team, refereed as a teenager, or simply watched your siblings play here. No matter the case, you've been to the park, and you're lying if you say you haven't.

9. Those white welcome signs.

Literal *cringe* just looking at it. Passing this sign after coming home from the city meant you were once again stuck in this little town with nothing to do, but you honestly kind of love having nothing to do sometimes.

10. This view.

Sure, there's not a whole lot going on in your small town, but with views like this you can't complain. #NatureIsCool #SoAreSmallTowns

Cover Image Credit: Myself

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What If I Told You Jelly Wrestling Was The New Date Party

Why a pool of jelly should be on every college students bucket-list.

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Right now, my house looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss novel. Our garden is bright pink, squishy and arguably smells and tastes pretty damn good. This may be because we've dumped 300L of premium non-toxic wrestling jelly around our entire house. Don't judge! The thought of carrying a swimming pool full of jelly to the dumpster at the end of the street is quite disheartening on a Sunday morning.

Why did we have 300L of jelly in a pool in our living room? I'm still asking myself the same question.

In a joint effort to make the most of our dwindling weeks in Alabama, our house decided to host the event of the year. We wanted to baffle the local Alabamians and make them wonder just how strange international students are - spoiler alert: we succeeded. After taking inspiration from our exchange predecessors (a group of rowdy boys who originally coined the idea in their last semester of exchange at Alabama), we decided to host a jelly-wrestling event. It was relatively unheard of, would provide hilarious entertainment for our guests, and most importantly, go down in history with this batch of internationals.

We ordered the jelly, filled the blow-up pool, and orchestrated a guest list through a process of inviting anyone we knew/met in the week leading up to it. We were so obsessed with getting multitudes of people at this party that I totally forgot I would need to lather myself in jelly and fight in front of all of them.

As the weekend approached, my nerves built. I hesitantly watched the jelly set throughout the day. We planned our outfits, our walk-on songs and the presentation of player profiles (so much effort went into this event). As it got closer, I became more and more doubtful in my ability to willingly make a fool of myself in the jelly.

I have always prided myself in my confidence. I try to never be fake and preach the need to disregard what others think of me. However, when your living room fills with eager college students (90% of whom are strangers) chanting to see the entertainment they were brazenly promised, it's fair enough to have a moment of self-consciousness.

My fellow party host — also the most courageous, carefree and funny person I know — approached me in-between mingling with guests. "We need to wrestle," she said. "The crowd is at its peak, and they're all waiting." She was right. I could feel their hunger for our humiliation in the air. We were the zoo animals, and they had come to see us.

I shook my head. There was no way I could live up to the expectations of this untamed crowd — I was in way over my head. I fumbled with excuses, "someone else should go first! I'm not even dressed and I" — she stopped me. Handing me a drink, she pleaded once more with her eyes. It was time.

I skulled the drink, changed into my warrior outfit and wrestling robe and took to the stage. Cheers erupted from the crowd, not for me personally, but for the prospect of entertainment at our expense.

I tried not to look anyone in the eyes — maybe I could avoid being identified as that girl who rolled around in jelly in future scenarios if I didn't let anyone see my face. My internal monologue began, a welcomed distraction to the voracious onlookers. I reminded myself that I wanted to do this. Wrestling in jelly is such a fun concept, and I had been excited for the entire week. I'd never get to participate in something this strange and hilarious again, so why was I so scared?

I looked over at my fellow host. She was laughing along with the crowd and seemed to be enjoying every moment of it. As I sat across from her in that $40 Target blow-up pool, watching her giggle at how silly we were, I felt ultimate respect towards her. It takes a certain (fabulous) kind of person to forego any and all embarrassment and find humor in their own bizarre actions. She didn't take herself seriously at all. She knew this was crazy, and yet she was totally unashamed. The crowd respected her for putting herself out there. I know I'll always think back to that moment and remember how much I valued her for attaining that quality.

So many eyes were on us, and for the first time all night, there was silence. Our referee and jelly life-guard counted us in. Three… two… one… GO!

I don't even remember the match. All I remember is rolling around in a big bowl of jelly with another girl while the crowd yelled and screamed in disbelief that this was actually happening. Most of my concentration went into trying to not wet myself while hysterically laughing.

Those three rounds of jelly-wrestling were some of the most fun I have ever had. We sparked an entire night of matches, bringing strangers together to dive into the slime. I walked around with pride. All inhibitions were released. It might have just been the drink I skulled prior to the match, but I remember feeling absolutely invincible like nothing could embarrass me. I knew I would never let the fear of what others might say about me stop me from having fun. I could put myself out there in front of a total crowd of strangers, and if they didn't like it then it wouldn't be my problem.

For those who have never dabbled with jelly-wrestling, I highly recommend. It's a fantastic way to build confidence, make new friends, and create a lasting impression of how strange international students are. We can now confidently say we've left our mark in Alabama... Literally — our living room floor is stained red.

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