8 Things I Miss About Home

8 Things I Miss About Home

Obviously I miss my family, friends, and dogs, but these are things that I didn't expect to miss as much as I do.
58
views

Fall break just ended at my school, and I was one of the few kids that didn’t get to go home for the weekend. It was a weekend full of Netflix, sleep, and no roommates. It was great, but after seeing everyone back at school, talking about seeing their family and friends, I realize how much I would love to go home right about now. I’m from St. Louis, a place that I never thought I would miss. But after living there for 18 years and then one day picking up my life and moving it to Texas, there are certain things I miss about home.

1. Being able to drive

My 16-year-old brother got the luxury of getting my car when I left, so that meant that I would not be road-tripping my car down to Texas. As much as I miss my actual car, I miss my freedom more. I miss being about to jump in the car and go meet my friends and I would give anything to have the freedom of leaving campus without having to bug my roommate to drive me or paying for an Uber.

2. The Valley

Back home we have this place called The Valley. It a hub in the middle of town where all of the best stores and restaurants are located. It’s 10 minutes from my house and it’s where most of my friends and I would spend our weekends.

3. Bread Co.

For those of you who don’t know, the restaurant you all know and love as Panera, started as St. Louis Bread Company. If you ever come to St. Louis, you will notice that there is a Panera on every corner and if you ever need help finding one, just follow the group of cars heading there around lunchtime.

4. Working WiFi

The WiFi on campus isn’t the best. It fails to connect all the time and the service in my dorm room sucks. I cannot wait until I can rely on my WiFi to get me through more than one episode of "The Office" again.

5. The leaves changing colors

Here in Texas, fall is really delayed. I’m used to all of the windows in my house being opened and the AC turned off in late September. This also means that everything here is still green. Green is pretty, don’t get me wrong, but the array of colors lining each road back home is way prettier.

6. Certain restaurants

I spent the past four years of high school going out to eat wayyyyyy more than I’d like to admit, but now I miss all of those places where I didn’t even need a menu to know what I wanted.

7. My kitchen

I love to cook, so living in a dorm room with no kitchen is a struggle. The only meals I can make are those that require a microwave or no appliances at all. I already have a list of things I want to make when I get home, and none of them require a microwave.

8. My large bed

Every since I was old enough to have a “big girl bed,” I had a queen-sized bed. I could sprawl out in any direction and still not have any of my limbs hanging off the edge. Now, I am confined to the XL twin beds that my school provides, and let me just say, I cannot wait to sleep in my large bed again.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

Popular Right Now

Not My Michigan

A Michigan student-athlete turned Registered Nurse on the Michigan Medicine contract negotiations in 2018.

29622
views

It's May 1st, 2016. I'm bright-eyed, eager, and graduating from the University of Michigan as a Nursing Student and Student-Athlete.

I am ready to take on the world the way that Michigan taught me how: fearlessly, compassionately, and wholeheartedly. I bleed blue. I know what it means to be a Wolverine and to represent the Michigan Difference in everything I do. I wear the block M on my School of Nursing scrubs and my Michigan Dance Team uniform well aware that it represents goodness, tradition, and excellence. I am determined. I am inspired. I am ready.

It's Monday, September 17th, 2018. What does Michigan mean to me now? I used to be so sure. Now, I simply don't know. So, what's the deal? How did my view on an institution become so indifferent in recent months?

I chose U of M to start my nursing career because it had the widely known reputation of putting its patients first, respecting its nurses, and providing the best care to patients in the state (5th in the country, to be exact). In my first year, as I was clumsily learning how to push patient stretchers, titrate intravenous vasopressors, and to communicate with the medical team, I proudly participated in our hospital's effort to achieve Magnet status.

When Nursing earned Magnet Status, an award given by the American Nurses' Credentialing Center and indicator of the strength and quality of Nursing at Michigan, I felt that same pride as I did in May of 2016.

I knew in my heart that I picked the best institution to develop my nursing practice and to give high quality, patient-centered care to anyone who walked, rolled, or was carried through the doors of Adult Emergency Services. The hospital's goals were aligned with mine and those around me. We put patients first, and more specifically, we put patients over profits.

I am lucky enough to work at a hospital that has been unionized for more than four decades. When I started working, the concept of a union was foreign to me. For those who may need a refresher, unions promote and protect the interests of all employees. They collectively bargain with employers to secure written agreements for employees regarding pay, benefits, and working conditions.

Collective bargaining agreements are legally enforceable contracts holding employers and employees to mutually agreed-to workplace rules and process to provide a fair and just workplace. The University of Michigan Professional Nurse Council, an affiliate of the Michigan Nurses Association, has been working diligently since January to bargain with the University of Michigan to protect me, the 5,700 nurses who work within the institution, and our patients. I'd like to think they're the good guys in this story.

Here's where things get sticky: David Spahlinger, president of our prestigious U of M health system, has publicly stated that Michigan is "committed to maintaining current staffing levels," but will not make this commitment in writing. Common sense is reflected in the most high-quality research on the topic of nurse-patient ratios and its direct effect on patient care.

Appropriate staffing allows me and my coworkers to give the quality of care that I know we have the ability to provide. High staffing levels are associated with reduced mortality, falls, medication errors, ulcers, restraint use and infections. Unregulated staffing is a significant barrier to nurses' abilities to provide optimal patient care and prevents Nursing at Michigan from providing what we know to be the Michigan Difference in healthcare.

UMPNC held voting on a work stoppage for unfair labor practices last week. Out of 4,000 votes cast by nurses at the U, 94% authorized a work stoppage in protest of the University's unfair labor practices. No date is set, but our elected nurse bargaining team now has the authority to call for action.

Thank you to Katie Oppenheim, who chairs our union, for reiterating in an article to the Detroit Free Press that a work stoppage is not our goal. "Our goal is a fair agreement which respects nurses and guarantees safe staffing. The university can remedy this situation immediately by stopping their unfair labor practices and bargaining in good faith."

I am proud to be a nurse and I hope that our efforts to keep Michigan a patients-over-profits institution are recognized at the community, state, and national level. Anne McGinity, David Spahlinger, and those who have the power to make Michigan the magical place I once thought it was, make like Nike and just do it. For the love of patients, nurses, and our great University. I know we are better than this.

(Stay Tuned, folks).

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Thinking About Your Future Is Hard

College is where you really have to start planning your future.

120
views

Since I'm still an undergrad, I have some time to plan my life after college - that is my life once I graduate and get my Bachelor's.

When I first came to college, I didn't expect much out of what I'd do once I received my Bachelor's in Animal Science. I just assumed that I was going to go straight into vet school, become a veterinarian, and open my own practice.

Nope. Not today.

I, of course, switched my major to English so I could concentrate my skills in creative writing. I didn't know what I could do as a creative writer and everyone assumed I wanted to be a teacher. During my panic, I took several career assessments and found some similar career paths that appealed to me and now I have a plan. I'm not saying it's full proof but it's a plan nonetheless.

It's nerve-wracking trying to make sure you're on the correct path. So I'm planning to go to grad school and get a masters and then a Ph.D. It's just the process of applying and funding grad school makes me want to curl into a ball, in a corner, on my bed, and under the covers. My mind freezes whenever I have to think about the fact that I, Jacqulea Anderson, will be going to grad school once I graduate. Me. ME! It's mind-blowing because I have a clue as to what I want to pursue relating to my Master's but not for my Doctorate's. Creative writing has a master's program, but to get my Ph.D., I would have to just get it in English if I want to stay that route. Which adds to the stress of planning my life after college.

Everything changes: your mind, tastes, and wants change. They develop the older you get and once you realize you don't want to pursue your dream major, then it's back to the drawing board. While you can change your degree in grad school, it's also a good idea to have a slight clue as to what program you want to apply for.

Along the way, you figure out the adult part of life. Such as taxes, insurance, rent/mortgage, random bills, credit scores, and everything else under the sun because who actually taught us what we needed to know about adult living? You have to figure out where you want to live and if it's convenient enough distance wise from your job or school. There's just so much to factor in once you leave undergrad and you have a support system (hopefully) that will help guide you, but in the end, it's still you. You have to be the one to make the decisions on what you want to do with your life based on the choices you were given. If you can make your own choice then more power to you.

Life is hard. College is hard. Learning to be a functioning adult that has 85% of their life together is a dream I'm just trying to make come true.

Related Content

Facebook Comments