Q&A With Someone That Decided Not To Go To University

Q&A With Someone That Decided Not To Go To University

WHAT?! NO DEGREE?! IS THAT EVEN LEGAL?!
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As my junior year of college has just come to a close, I have been wondering ‘where would I be without school?’ ‘what on earth would I be doing?’ We have all heard it, that people went to college and got a degree that they never use, or they are drowning in debt, or their college experience was mainly partying and binge drinking, not so much schooling and practical experience. So, what if I had never gone?

To take a glimpse into what a life without a four-year college education may look like, I decided to sit down with someone who has not gone onto further education at university level. I spoke to him about his reasoning for not going and what his present looks like at 21 years old, and what he expects to see in the future.

Why didn’t you go to uni?

I didn’t know what I wanted to do at the time and it didn’t seem a great plan spending all that money on tuition when I wasn’t 100% on where I wanted my career path to go.

What did you or are you doing instead?

I took a year out to work and try out as many things as I could to see if it would lead me somewhere and it led me into a more defined career path and certainty in what I wanted to do.

How has not going affected you?

It’s made me try lots of different things and experiment and eventually got me a really good job.

What do you do as a job now?

I am an automotive technician at one of the largest vehicle rental companies in the UK. It even has a Royal Warrant.

Do you feel like you missed out socially?

I have reached the stage in life where that doesn’t matter anymore, a promising career, stable job and a good salary make up many times over for what I could have missed socially. And I already have a large group of very close mates.

If you could, would you go back and make a different decision to go?

No, I would not, I feel like I made the best choice I could have made.

Do you plan on ever going to uni? Why or why not?

I do, as it is the right thing for me to do at this point in my life. Thanks to the experience I have gained working, I know what I want to do, and it will further my career goals. I 100% want to do so in the near future.

What advice would you give someone who is questioning whether or not to go?

I would say to try and do what you love in life and not worry about Uni at the moment, as you can go whenever you want, in a years time or a few years you will definitely have a better idea of what you want to do and going in as a mature student has many benefits over going in straight after A levels (or high school).

And would you still identify as successful right now, even without a degree?

I would identify as more successful than if I had just completed a degree. As I would have tens of thousands of pounds of debt, no certainty of a job, a degree I wasn’t sure I wanted and would have just spent three-plus years of what could have already been put into a job, and be carving out a career with a good company.




Cover Image Credit: https://pixabay.com/en/doors-choices-choose-open-decision-1767563/

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8 Things You Should Never Say To An Education Major

"Is your homework just a bunch of coloring?"
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Yes, I'm an Education major, and yes, I love it. Your opinion of the field won't change my mind about my future. If you ever happen to come across an Education major, make sure you steer clear of saying these things, or they might hold you in from recess.

1. "Is your homework just a bunch of coloring?"

Um, no, it's not. We write countless lesson plans and units, match standards and objectives, organize activities, differentiate for our students, study educational theories and principles, and write an insane amount of papers on top of all of that. Sometimes we do get to color though and I won't complain about that.

2. "Your major is so easy."

See above. Also, does anyone else pay tuition to have a full-time job during their last semester of college?

3. "It's not fair that you get summers off."

Are you jealous? Honestly though, we won't really get summers off. We'll probably have to find a second job during the summer, we'll need to keep planning, prepping our classroom, and organizing to get ready for the new school year.

4. “That's a good starter job."

Are you serious..? I'm not in this temporarily. This is my career choice and I intend to stick with it and make a difference.

5. “That must be a lot of fun."

Yes, it definitely is fun, but it's also a lot of hard work. We don't play games all day.

6. “Those who can't, teach."

Just ugh. Where would you be without your teachers who taught you everything you know?

7. “So, you're basically a babysitter."

I don't just monitor students, I teach them.

8. “You won't make a lot of money."

Ah yes, I'm well aware, thanks for reminding me. Teachers don't teach because of the salary, they teach because they enjoy working with students and making a positive impact in their lives.

Cover Image Credit: BinsAndLabels

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3 Struggles Of Attending A Pre-Med Dominated University — No Matter What Your Major Is

It's a hard knock life for the many pre-med students out there.

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Even though we as college students are technically considered adults, we are still burdened by stress at a young age. Especially in a pre-med oriented school, we feel pressured to keep up with or even surpass the achievements of others as we struggle to maintain our busy schedules while attempting to balance what little time we have left for ourselves. It's a sad reality.

1. The competition

Coming from a very pre-med oriented university, I can't help but feel the competitive vibes around me. During the lecture, I can hear the students around me ask their peers what score they received on the most recent midterm while others boast about how busy they are during the week because of all of the things that they are doing outside of the classroom.

It's this dog eat dog environment and constant comparison that makes students and myself included feel as if we are somehow lagging behind or not doing as much as we should be doing so we push ourselves even harder to keep up. As much as we don't want to, we have the tendency to measure our success in terms of others' success, and this, in turn, makes it more difficult for us to focus on ourselves. Now, I'm sure that you've been told not to compare yourself to others, but in the end, isn't that how you gain admission into medical school? By being compared to others? It's all relative.

2. The authenticity

It's not rare to see a pre-med student taking 18 or more credits while trying to squeeze in some volunteer work, a campus job, and even some research hours all into one day. At times, however, I question whether or not they truly want to do all of these things, but at the same time, I understand that they feel pressured to embody the "ideal" medical school applicant.

One of my friends once said to me, "I need to beef up my resume", and it's sad to see how she now feels constantly pressured to apply for a volunteer position or a job because of this. I also see others dread the work that they do, but they continue to stick with it and overload themselves because they believe that is what admissions officers want to see. I am a firm believer of doing something because you genuinely want to and not because you feel like you have to, yet this mentality gets lost as one becomes so immersed in meeting the requirements of the medical school.

3. The balance

While doing well in your classes is important, so is eating, showering, and sleeping. In fact, I think that one's physical and mental health triumphs all else. I recall the hectic week that one of my friends recently pushed through. She had a weekend class and an exam as part of something she pursues on the side, and that same week, we had a chemistry midterm followed by a biology one and not to mention all of the other assignments we had due in between. My friend already felt tired and burnt out from the weekend, and this led her to miss a lecture and some homework assignments. She even went a day without eating an actual meal.

With only a bag of popcorn for dinner one night, she stayed up until FOUR in the morning to catch up on what she had missed during the day. Many of my other friends who are pre-med struggle to balance academics, extracurriculars, leisure time, and maintenance of their overall health because there is always a trade-off. There are only 24 hours in a day, and one thing has to be sacrificed in order to obtain the other, and I wish it wasn't this way.

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