Psychoanalytic Analysis Of Voldemort

Psychoanalytic Analysis Of Voldemort

A brief examination of He-who-shall-not-be-named.
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As someone who studies Psychology, I have come to understand that the knowledge gathered from this rather fascinating field may be used to analyze various aspects of popular and classical literature. Being an avid reader with a fervent passion for the Arts, this has fueled my habit of critically inspecting diverse literary works with the aid of psychological theories. I usually am interested in analyzing the characters present in a novel and Lord Voldemort, from the Harry Potter series, is one who never seizes to amaze me.

The Harry Potter series happens to be one of my favorite works of creative writing and J.K Rowling’s character, Voldemort, is one I always examine with the aid of Freud’s psychosexual theory of development. This theory attempts to highlights the various stages a child progress through in order to become an adult and Freud often suggests that the failure to successfully complete a stage may result in serious consequences later in life.

To understand this character through this perspective it is of utter most importance to look back at the characteristics of his childhood. Tom Riddle, the young and not yet deviant Voldemort, was an orphan who was gifted with extraordinary magical abilities; thus qualifying him to be part of the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. He spent his early years in an orphanage, where his days were miserably spent and where he lacked in parental love, or any other type of love in general. Due to the presence of such environmental circumstances the Dark Lord’s development was interrupted, preventing his unconscious from gaining all of the dimensionality which it was meant to display.

Freud would probably claim that Voldemort’s life in isolation prevented him from overcoming the Oedipus complex, an important stage of one’s psychosexual development. The Oedipus complex is a conflict in one of the early stages of development where one develops a sexually driven attachment to one’s mother and hatred towards one’s father. As an orphan Tom Riddle was incapable of creating any sort of attachment to his parents and was then unable to overcome the Oedipus conflict. Therefore resulting in the inhibition of the development of his ego and superego. According to Freud individuals’ subconscious are composed of the id, ego and superego and these forces dominate one’s actions. The id represents uncontrollable drives and desires, the superego is the self-critical conscience and the ego mediates the tension between the id and superego.

As Voldemort’s ego and superego were never properly developed during his childhood he does not hold the same types of moral standards that others deem to be appropriate. Instead he is far more concerned with satiating the desires of his id.

It is quite interesting to see that this theory is not the only one which may be suitable to investigate Voldemort’s personality traits. I believe that Karen Horney’s neurosis theory, which is also based on psychoanalytic beliefs, brilliantly portrays him through her definitions of neurotic needs. From the list which she created we may see that he relates to the neurotic needs for prestige, personal achievement and perfection. His behaviors mirror this perfectly as he is always attempting to convince everyone that he is the most powerful wizard in existence and he uses aggressive means to get his point across. Horney would qualify this as the coping techniques which he has chosen to use to satisfy his excessive needs.

It is marvelous to see how these theories connect with this persona that Rowling has created and it is easy for us to see that her genius is well reflected in her work. One could only wish to able to create characters who are just as incredibly rich as hers.

Cover Image Credit: Flickr

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To The Parent Who Chose Addiction

Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

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When I was younger I resented you, I hated every ounce of you, and I used to question why God would give me a parent like you. Not now. Now I see the beauty and the blessings behind having an addict for a parent. If you're reading this, it isn't meant to hurt you, but rather to thank you.

Thank you for choosing your addiction over me.

Throughout my life, you have always chosen the addiction over my programs, my swim meets or even a simple movie night. You joke about it now or act as if I never questioned if you would wake up the next morning from your pill and alcohol-induced sleep, but I thank you for this. I thank you because I gained a relationship with God. The amount of time I spent praying for you strengthened our relationship in ways I could never explain.

SEE ALSO: They're Not Junkies, You're Just Uneducated

Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

The amount of hurt and disappointment our family has gone through has brought us closer together. I have a relationship with Nanny and Pop that would never be as strong as it is today if you had been in the picture from day one. That in itself is a blessing.

Thank you for showing me how to love.

From your absence, I have learned how to love unconditionally. I want you to know that even though you weren't here, I love you most of all. No matter the amount of heartbreak, tears, and pain I've felt, you will always be my greatest love.

Thank you for making me strong.

Thank you for leaving and for showing me how to be independent. From you, I have learned that I do not need anyone else to prove to me that I am worthy of being loved. From you, I have learned that life is always hard, but you shouldn't give into the things that make you feel good for a short while, but should search for the real happiness in life.

Most of all, thank you for showing me how to turn my hurt into motivation.

I have learned that the cycle of addiction is not something that will continue into my life. You have hurt me more than anyone, but through that hurt, I have pushed myself to become the best version of myself.

Thank you for choosing the addiction over me because you've made me stronger, wiser, and loving than I ever could've been before.

Cover Image Credit: http://crashingintolove.tumblr.com/post/62246881826/pieffysessanta-tumblr-com

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5 Songs to Add to Your Playlist This Month

Spring into finals week (and the summer) by "cleaning up" your playlist

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Here are some fun, fresh new tracks to check out as you finish out the rest of the school year and help you get out of your "music comfort zone!"

“Patience” by Tame Impala 

Genre: Electronic/Alternative

Tame Impala FINALLY released new music (!!), and this track is absolutely stunning. With frontrunner Kevin Parker staying on brand with the band's psychedelic, seemingly ethereal style, it sounds like a combination of 70s soft rock and waves of modern-day electronica, with Parker's voice drifting in and out in a kind of otherworldly, mellowed-out manner.

“Harmony Hall” by Vampire Weekend 

Genre: Alternative/Indie Pop

Vampire Weekend is also releasing an album, entitled "Father of the Bride", on May 3rd. From the looks of it, this track relates to the theme of marriage/weddings present in the album's title, and it is a fun, upbeat song that I have been listening to a lot in the morning as I'm getting ready for class! Ezra Koenig's voice is so unique and can cover a broad range, and I highly recommend listening to some of the band's other work as well ("Step" from their 2013 release "Modern Vampires of the City" is one of my all-time favorite songs!).

“Ready to Let Go” by Cage the Elephant 

Genre: Alternative/Alternative Rock

So many great artists are (finally) releasing new albums this year, and Cage the Elephant falls into this category. This track is an absolute banger and doesn't stray much from the band's style in that it includes a lot of loud guitar and dynamic vocals. Like Vampire Weekend, Cage the Elephant has been around since the early 2000s, and I highly recommend checking out some of their earlier work as well (big fan of their most recent album, actually!)

“Apple Orchard” by Beach House 

Genre: Indie/Electronic

Beach House is one of my favorite bands of all time, as I find a kind of an ethereal, beautiful sadness in the dreamy style of instrumentalist Alex Scally and lucid vocals of singer Victoria Legrand. This track is from their 2006 self-titled debut and is probably one of my favorite songs they've ever released. The lyrics are poetic and perfect for the post-finals enjoyment of spring weather, in that they preach relaxation and restfulness, and the song's electronic rhythms echo the essence of spring as well. If you like this song, then I highly recommend checking out the band's other albums as well (Depression Cherry is one of my favorite albums of all time).

“April Come She Will” by Simon & Garfunkel 

Genre: 60s Pop

No spring playlist is complete without a little Simon & Garfunkel! This song is a classic, its timeless, poetic lyrics capturing the epitome of the coming of spring and all its glory. In fact, I consider the entire album (entitled Sound of Silence) to be perfect for the pleasantness and feelings of renewal/natural revitalization associated with the coming months, so be sure to give it a listen if you haven't heard it before!

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