Here I Am, Procrastinating

Here I Am, Procrastinating

"Similar to that of a hangover, procrastination is a self induced sickness that many of us suffer chronically."

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Procrastinate. (verb) to put off intentionally and habitually: to put off intentionally the doing of something that should be done. (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

More often than not, we find ourselves in the situation of thinking about what it is we should be doing instead of actually doing what needs to be done. Unsure of why we do it, it typically becomes a problem right around the time when the last thing we need at that moment is problems. And in that moment of "the problem," we will continue to make it worse as we have left ourselves in a position of not even knowing where to being or go about fixing the problem without feeling overwhelmed.

Similar to that of a hangover, procrastination is a self-induced sickness that many of us suffer chronically.

With no real cure, the problem continues to worsen. We find ourselves under mounds and piles of work and responsibility. Unsure of a way out. The stress suffocating us, so we decide we need a little break and will get back to it later.

Day after day, night after night, procrastination always finds a way to wean itself in. With such immediate effect, there is really no way to avoid it once present.

Sometimes, procrastination effects have become so prevalent in our lives, we begin procrastinating our procrastination.

"Thinking about doing homework without showering off the stench of the day is preposterous. I must shower before I start. But once I shower, I can't do anything else because I will sweat and that will have defeated the purpose of the shower. Well, this assignment is due at midnight and it's only 10 pm. I will clean out my car since I have been meaning to do that for the last month. Wash the dishes I have put off the last few days, hop into the shower and get back to work with plenty of time to spare."

*Looking at Instagram, article due in nine minutes

And after the effects dwindle, we realize that every little bit of stress and thought of having "way too much work to do" was all at our own expense and could have been avoided completely.

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20 Things To Do In Las Vegas When You're Under 21

"Why are you going to Vegas? You aren't even 21!"
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If you have yet to turn the glorious age of 21, but still want to venture to Sin City, you are not alone. Every summer my friends and I take a trip to Las Vegas, and we have the time of our lives, the only catch being that we are all underage. One might question the reasoning behind our seemingly useless trip, but to heck with those people. They simply do not understand that Vegas is not just for those who are above the age of 21, anyone can have a little fun in Sin City!

1. Treasure Island Pool (or any pool with no age restrictions)

Each year we stay at Treasure Island, so we may be a bit biased, but it really is a good time. There is a DJ on weekends with great music, and for the past two years, almost the entire pool has engaged in some sort of choreographed dance to the Dougie or Cha Cha Slide.

2. The High Roller Observation Wheel

At 520-feet in diameter, this is the highest observation wheel in the world. At $24.94 for a day pass or $34.95 for a night pass, the cost is relatively reasonable. Plus walking around the Linq promenade where High Roller is located is really neat. There are a ton of places to eat or grab dessert nearby, and there's a Sprinkles Cupcakes shop!

3. Fremont Street

Live bands and DJs are often here, plus it's just a really cool place to walk around. You can also zip line down this street, which I think would be really fun.

4. Bellagio Fountains

My all-time favorite! There is a show every 15 minutes, and they are breathtaking!

5. Eat

Well duh! I don't know if you're aware, but Vegas has buffets galore. Last time I was in Vegas with my family we bought a 24-hour buffet pass which gave us access to any buffet at any Harrah's Casino for 24 hours. I've never been so full in my life, but it was so worth it. The best, in my opinion, is the Rio Buffet, but the Flamingo one has cotton candy, so who is the real winner here? If you're not into buffets (why?) here are some of my favorite places to eat in Vegas:

  • Toby Keith's I Love This Bar & Grill (Harrah's): Perfect for the country music loving folks.
  • Señor Frogs (Treasure Island): Very interactive, DJ, karaoke, occasional dancing and conga line with free shots
  • Serendipity 3 (Caesar's Palace): Get the frozen hot chocolate, you won't regret it.

6. The Roller Coaster at New York-New York

At $14 per ride, this is a great way to check out the New York-New York Hotel & Casino.

7. The Bellagio

Check out the beautiful conservatory and botanical garden at Bellagio, which is also free (yay!) and themed depending on the time of year.

8. The Venetian

Go window shopping and you might catch a random show with actors on stilts. The real attraction, however, is the gondola rides ($18.50 per person).

9. Volcano show outside the Mirage

The volcano erupts at night, once every hour until 11 p.m. Free!

10. Sirens show outside Treasure Island


This is also free but arrive early to get a spot.

11. Shopping!

The strip itself offers so many places to shop. Almost every casino offers some type of themed shop. Planet Hollywood and Treasure Island have their own malls and The Forum Shops at Caesars offer luxury brands (a girl can dream right?). All along the strip, there are souvenir shops, but I really love M&M;'s World and Sweet Factory.

12. Circus Circus Adventuredome Theme Park

You can go on the rides, play laser tag or hang out at the arcade.

13. The Rides at Stratosphere

If you're not afraid of heights you can take an elevator up 101 stories to the top of the Stratosphere and partake in several death-defying rides at the top or even bungee jump off the side (good luck with that).

14. See a Show

From Cirque du Soleil to the Blue Man Group or even Britney — if you're willing to spend the money there is a show for you.

15. The Eiffel Tower at Paris

Take a ride to the top for only $14 during the day or $19 at night.

16. The Las Vegas Sign

Take a picture in front of the iconic sign, because did you really go to Vegas if you didn't post about it on Instagram?

17. Flamingo Wildlife Habitat

At none other than the Flamingo Hotel & Casino. If you walk to the back and go outside, they have flamingos everywhere. The pool here is also really fun and has great slides.

18. Take a Picture with an Elvis Impersonator

You might have to tip them, but come on! It's Elvis in Vegas!

19. Siegfried & Roy's Secret Garden & Dolphin Habitat


Go visit the beautiful bottlenose dolphins, white tigers, white lions and leopards for $20 admission.

20. Walk the strip

Especially at night, the Strip is all lit up and filled with people. I like to go see all the casinos and take pictures.


Have fun, kiddos! Viva Las Vegas!

Cover Image Credit: pexels

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Minimalism Addresses Our Culture Of Consumption

Decluttering your life and consuming less allows you to live in the moment.

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Most of us, at some point in our lives, have become trapped by our culture of consumption. It's a disgusting display of wealth and social status that social divides us. This social divide does a great job at inhibiting our potential at building objective, meaningful relationships. Material possessions become our identity and we begin to lose a true sense of who we really are. It's entirely possible for us to exist as content, beautiful human beings without participating in the culture of consumption we have been duped into believing in.

The problem with our culture of consumption is that it has become a key aspect of every activity. We give too much value to "things," focusing less on their contribution to our overall wellbeing, passions, or happiness. We may experience temporary contentment or pleasure, but it seldom lasts forever. Minimalism eliminates the "things" from our routine, allowing us to find contentment from the simple things in life.

Minimalism is not an expensive hobby one takes up on the quest for self-discovering and happiness. There is this huge misconception that being a minimalist requires a fat wallet and that your life is now restricted by rules and limitations. This simply is not true. This misconception comes from the elitist culture which has emerged through social media outlets. This distorted perception has blurred the individualistic nature of minimalism. A lifestyle often associated as a fad is actually a lifestyle that de-clutters your physical and mental state.

Minimalists are people who…

  • Make intentional decisions; that add value to their lives.
  • Focus on personal growth and the quality of their relationships.
  • Live in the moment.
  • Discover personal potential by eliminating obstacles standing in our way.
  • Consume less and intentionally.
  • Gift experiences rather than material possessions.

There isn't anything necessarily wrong with owning material possessions. If you find importance in an object that genuinely makes you happy then, great! Minimalism doesn't have to look like white walls behind aesthetically placed black furniture. This concept focuses on the internal value system we all forget we control. Start small; declutter your thoughts. We easily get stuck in our routines that we forget to look slow down and just breathe. Living in the moment is by far the most valuable aspect of minimalism because it allows us to feel and experience every minute of our existence.

If you're someone who enjoys nature, there's more value to be found in the adventures we seek out and create than those created for us. Discover birds you've never seen before, wander down trials in your neighborhood, or uncover beaches no one else knows about. You'll find more value in the creation of your own adventure because those experiences are completely your own.

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