Politics And Economics Are As Important As STEM

Politics And Economics Are As Important As STEM

Why you should care about politics and economics.

99
views

It's common for people to come to the conclusion that politics, economics, and the humanities are questionable fields. Not useful. Not productive. Jobless. Nonsense.

I concede none of those points. In fact, I frequently find that politics and economics are extremely important to well-being and prosperity.

The stigma against political science is far stronger than that against economics. This opinion is likely because of the scientific and mathematical elements contained within economics as a discipline. Moreover, the economy is an important part of society. It affects our daily lives. It discusses our wealth, our country's performance, and the country's overall state of affairs. But most would argue that economics can't stand beside chemistry, biology, or engineering. That perspective demonstrates two things:

1) lack of critical thought, and

2) mob mentality.

The intersection of political science and economics determines everything. The world spins on the market. The market is undoubtedly influenced by government actors, politicians, politics. Don't believe me? Let's consider an example.

The stock market had expanded rapidly in the 1920s, but stocks were being overvalued. Companies were not actually worth their stock market value in the real world. People really wanted stocks, so demand was high — but this wasn't an accurate representation of how companies were performing. Investors began to realize this and started to sell overpriced stocks left and right.

Eventually, it became clear that investors were uncertain. Trades were being made at rapid rates, but the investors were selling stocks for cheaper than they had been purchased. Sixteen million shares were traded in one day. Everyone was losing money.

So naturally, consumer confidence declined. People stopped spending. They were afraid of losing money. This dramatic decrease in spending and investment led to companies producing less. Spending and demand went down, and subsequently supply went down as well. Companies stopped producing as much as they had been because they weren't selling as much as they had been. As a result, people were laid off. Households were losing jobs -- they were losing cash, causing spending to decline even further. So more people were laid off. You can see the vicious cycle. At one point, half of the United States' banks failed. Fifteen million Americans were unemployed. The world was in the midst of an economic disaster.

This situation is commonly referred to as the Great Depression. It went on for 15 years.

This is what economics studies. It analyzes, attempts to anticipate and hopefully, prevents these situations. Where does politics fit in?

Obviously, the government tried to respond to the Great Depression. Franklin D. Roosevelt was the president at the time. He passed a variety of policies to stimulate the economy. Yet the Great Depression continued until WWII. In fact, two UCLA economists concluded that FDR's policies prolonged the Depression by several years.

It's unimportant whether they are right or not. What is important is that the economic policy by Roosevelt (and Congress) certainly had an impact on the country's economy. In fact, it was the reason some people may or may not have had enough money to eat. It was the reason that people may or may not have had jobs. It was the reason people could or could not afford homes.

To argue that the intersection of politics and economics is a useless study would be out of touch. Economics and politics create or destroy the world we live in. The next time you're told that they don't, ask the person what would happen if the demand for STEM labor fell.

Popular Right Now

An Open Letter To Democrats From A Millennial Republican

Why being a Republican doesn't mean I'm inhuman.
55591
views

Dear Democrats,

I have a few things to say to you — all of you.

You probably don't know me. But you think you do. Because I am a Republican.

Gasp. Shock. Horror. The usual. I know it all. I hear it every time I come out of the conservative closet here at my liberal arts university.

SEE ALSO: What I Mean When I Say I'm A Young Republican

“You're a Republican?" people ask, saying the word in the same tone that Draco Malfoy says “Mudblood."

I know that not all Democrats feel about Republicans this way. Honestly, I can't even say for certain that most of them do. But in my experience, saying you're a Republican on a liberal college campus has the same effect as telling someone you're a child molester.

You see, in this day and age, with leaders of the Republican Party standing up and spouting unfortunately ridiculous phrases like “build a wall," and standing next to Kim Davis in Kentucky after her release, we Republicans are given an extreme stereotype. If you're a Republican, you're a bigot. You don't believe in marriage equality. You don't believe in racial equality. You don't believe in a woman's right to choose. You're extremely religious and want to impose it on everyone else.

Unfortunately, stereotypes are rooted in truth. There are some people out there who really do think these things and feel this way. And it makes me mad. The far right is so far right that they make the rest of us look bad. They make sure we aren't heard. Plenty of us are fed up with their theatrics and extremism.

For those of us brave enough to wear the title “Republican" in this day and age, as millennials, it's different. Many of us don't agree with these brash ideas. I'd even go as far as to say that most of us don't feel this way.

For me personally, being a Republican doesn't even mean that I automatically vote red.

When people ask me to describe my political views, I usually put it pretty simply. “Conservative, but with liberal social views."

“Oh," they say, “so you're a libertarian."

“Sure," I say. But that's the thing. I'm not really a libertarian.

Here's what I believe:

I believe in marriage equality. I believe in feminism. I believe in racial equality. I don't want to defund Planned Parenthood. I believe in birth control. I believe in a woman's right to choose. I believe in welfare. I believe more funds should be allocated to the public school system.

Then what's the problem? Obviously, I'm a Democrat then, right?

Wrong. Because I have other beliefs too.

Yes, I believe in the right to choose — but I'd always hope that unless a pregnancy would result in the bodily harm of the woman, that she would choose life. I believe in welfare, but I also believe that our current system is broken — there are people who don't need it receiving it, and others who need it that cannot access it.

I believe in capitalism. I believe in the right to keep and bear arms, because I believe we have a people crisis on our hands, not a gun crisis. Contrary to popular opinion, I do believe in science. I don't believe in charter schools. I believe in privatizing as many things as possible. I don't believe in Obamacare.

Obviously, there are other topics on the table. But, generally speaking, these are the types of things we millennial Republicans get flack for. And while it is OK to disagree on political beliefs, and even healthy, it is NOT OK to make snap judgments about me as a person. Identifying as a Republican does not mean I am the same as Donald Trump.

Just because I am a Republican, does not mean you know everything about me. That does not give you the right to make assumptions about who I am as a person. It is not OK for you to group me with my stereotype or condemn me for what I feel and believe. And for a party that prides itself on being so open-minded, it shocks me that many of you would be so judgmental.

So I ask you to please, please, please reexamine how you view Republicans. Chances are, you're missing some extremely important details. If you only hang out with people who belong to your own party, chances are you're missing out on great people. Because, despite what everyone believes, we are not our stereotype.

Sincerely,

A millennial Republican

Cover Image Credit: NEWSWORK.ORG

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Dave Ramsey, Thank You For Sharing Your Money Tips And Knowledge With The Rest Of Us

From just starting your program and being only on baby step one I have realized many things.

75
views

Ever since starting college I have always had that thought in the back of my head about how am I going to pay off my student debt after getting out of college. This is probably a thought that every student has when they attend college and they know that after they receive their education that they are out in the real world where they have payments to make every month and probably be in debt for most of their life. But after watching your podcast and following your Instagram and seeing all these people paying off hundreds of thousands of dollars in a couple of months is very inspirational.

Paid off student debtDave Ramsey Instagram

From just starting your program and being only on baby step one I have realized many things. One, I spend money on a lot of things that I don't need but never realized until I started tracking my spending to make a budget. Two, saving a thousand dollar before actually tackling your debt is a great task as it shows that if you can save a thousand you can find a way to pay off your debt then. Though it does seem like a long process that doesn't seem possible till you finally hit the triple-digit mark. Three, you don't actually need a credit card in life because you will actually have money you can spend instead. Though I am still wondering how exactly this would work later on with wanting to buy homes and cars.

But overall thank you for sharing your story and knowledge about money and your experiences so others can learn and do better with theirs. So let's all be weird and not broke as you like to say.

Related Content

Facebook Comments