The United States' federal government should substantially increase its non-military exploration and/or development of the Earth's oceans. There are many benefits to doing so: reducing overfishing, limiting ocean acidification, conducting disease research, restricting invasive species and decreasing ocean dumping. Other affirmatives could deal with changes in Arctic shipping routes or opportunities for oil and natural gas exploration, according to ihsa.org. Oceans holding 99% of all living life on Earth and 97% of our water hints at, we have to take care of our home.

Nonetheless, conservation efforts will not be enough at this point. It helps to have common sense in our fishery management. It helps to clean our beaches. That being said, we have to take advantage of our incredible opportunity advances in technology has given us. Improvements in underwater navigation sensor technology and underwater navigation algorithms are enabling novel underwater vehicles and novel underwater vehicle missions. These missions remind us of Obama's implementation plan drafted in 2012 for the stewardship of the ocean. We have to hold ourselves accountable for taking care of our planet, and there is nothing wrong with taking the extra step with our curiosity. Let's dive into S. Harris abstract regarding ARGO, an example of our ocean-exploration technology and what we can do with this power. From the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, USA, ieeexplore.ieee.org.

"Developed by the Deep Submergence Laboratory of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, ARGO is an unmanned instrument platform designed for deep ocean search and survey. Integrating both visual and acoustic imaging techniques for real-time viewing, ARGO is a system which provides continuous, around-the-clock operation for seafloor exploration. With a design depth of 6,000 meters, it is towed on a steel-armored coaxial cable which supports several channels of frequency-multiplexed signals. In addition, surface support is highly integrated, bringing together ship control, navigation, and vehicle operation into a transportable control center. In our expedition that found the TITANIC, this system was tested for the first time and proved itself by delivering the exciting pictures of the famous shipwreck lying on the bottom of the ocean. This paper will briefly describe ARGO and the reasons for its development. Examples of ARGO imaging from our first year of operation will demonstrate how modern oceanographers remotely sense the ocean floor."

Deep ocean exploration is such an important focus on our kid's livelihood. We have plans, technology, but we need more. We need more awareness and funding regarding this research-based, non-military exploration of marine life. Donate to oceanexploration.org.