Cuffing season. Who would've thought that two words could have such an impact on us college students? For those not familiar with this term, cuffing season occurs during the winter months (primarily November and December) and is when people who are usually single end up in or begin looking for relationships. No one can explain the science behind it, but the cold weather has everyone yearning for someone to cuddle with.

Over the past month, I've begun to notice that most of my friends have either entered into relationships or talked about wanting to be cuffed. It was so weird to see all my friends finding significant others, and I started to question whether I, too, wanted to find a special someone.

Someone to watch movies with, to drink hot chocolate with, and to visit the Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center with. It all seemed so sweet and wholesome that I thought to myself if all my friends were seeking a serious relationship, why shouldn't I? However, there was one thing keeping me from jumping into cuffing season: I don't believe in it.

To put it simply, I consider cuffing season to be incredibly flawed. Sure, it may seem nice to spend the cold months with someone you care about but are you really entering into a relationship for the right reasons? If you happened to find someone who gives you butterflies or makes your heart flutter, then props to you. But if you're getting into a relationship solely because you want to be cuffed, you could end up in a tricky situation down the line.

The person you're with is nice and sweet, but eventually cuffing season will end and you may find out that you didn't actually like this person, but instead focused on the idea of being with this person. Trust me, there's a difference. Falling for someone and falling for the idea of someone are two completely different things.

If you are adamant on entering into a relationship, which is what happens to many people during this time, you may settle for someone you don't actually like. And by the time you realize you don't really like this person, it'll be too late and feelings will get hurt.

I'm not in any way saying that there's anything wrong with dating or trying to date during this time. However, it's so easy to get carried away by the enamor of the winter months and cuffing season. Individuals may focus on their want for a serious relationship instead of considering whether they even want one or are ready for one. Relationships only work if the two people are truly invested in and care for each other, and that extends beyond these few months.

Big gestures during the holiday season seem nice, but it is often the small things that are the most meaningful. If you find someone that you genuinely care for and want to be "cuffed" to, then go for it. But if you don't think that you're at that point yet, sit cuffing season out. There'll be plenty of winters down the line, and spending it with someone you truly want to be with will only make it more meaningful. For now, enjoy this independence.