No, Writers Are Not Lazy Daydreamers

No, Writers Are Not Lazy Daydreamers

Nor are their procrastinations and pacings-about unproductive.

5
views

If anything, the fact that writers pace about proves that their minds are functioning, either contemplating all of the words to be written down or to be avoided. While progress is not made on the paper, it does not mean that progress is not made in the mind.

If a writer is not day-dreaming, he is dreaming the inspiration for his novel the same way Robert Louis Stevenson came up with nothing to write about until he dreamt of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. As such, if the process of formulating what words to write involves an unconscious part of the mind, then this process is beyond the control of the writer. Creativity is not a phenomena to be forced, rather it is processed through repetitive thought and the distractions could become inspirations. It can only require spontaneous moments of epiphany in order to conceptualize new, original topics to write about.

Procrastination can be an ordinary part of a writer's life, especially if it is used in a way of managing anxiety and fear of failure when it is hard to materialize a story out of nothingness. So it is unlike what King Lear would said, "Nothing can come from nothing." The process of writing is just too complicated to pinpoint and procrastination seems to be a major component. It is not one that would be readily accepted nor is it desirable but it does help facilitate the thinking process.

However, the production of idea invention can only be stimulated by the increased activity in the frontal lobe. Originally, the brain activity was thought to have been divided between the left and right sides, but when it involves creativity it mainly has to do with the connection between the temporal and frontal lobe. This is how exercise, phototherapy, and a functioning dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (responsible for working memory and flexible problem solving) can help with depressive and non-depressive frontal lobes that have lesions that can result in a decrease in writing ideas.

Since it is hard to expect any productivity from an unproductive circumstances such as the delay of idea invention, I would expect there to be more research into this issue. However, the issue remains that writer's block is a completely normal part of the writing process and is to be expected. When it is expected, then a cure for it would also be already planned.

Cover Image Credit: Scott III, Robert. "A Snowman My Aunt Liz Made." Flickr. Taken on 16 Dec. 2017.

Popular Right Now

Hailey Miller's Debut Single Is 'The One'

"The One" is available now across all streaming platforms.

408
views

Being able to blend genres well is a true testament to a great artist, and Hailey Miller has done just that. Breaking onto the pop-country scene with her debut single "The One", the song speaks to the lessons that come out of unfortunate heartbreak, and definitely resonates with people going through one. I got the chance to talk with Hailey about her music, Nashville, and plans for the future:

1. What inspiration did you pull from to write "The One"?

"The One" was inspired by a relationship I was in. It was young love, not the healthiest relationship, and was dragged on for way longer than it should've been. I'd pretty much worked through all the heartbreak by the time it was fully over, and this song felt like the final piece to the puzzle. To acknowledge that some good came from the whole experience, and that lessons were learned. It just kind of poured out of me. It was exactly what I needed at the time. I wrote it and instantly felt peace. Like I could finally let it all go. It's a different kind of breakup anthem, and I hope that people can connect to it in the same way I did.

2. Do you tend to pull from personal experience to write or do you write using a third person perspective?

I definitely prefer to write from personal experience. I've written from a third person perspective, but it always feels more genuine for me to write about things I've been through first hand. It's just easier! It flows better, and feels more honest. Especially if I'm planning on using the song for myself. As an artist, I always want the truths I'm speaking to be genuine. I feel like people connect better that way. If I can't fully connect to the stuff I'm singing, how can I expect the listeners to? Personally, as an artist, the stories behind my songs are just as important to me as the song itself. That being said, if I can connect to someone else's experience deeply, writing third person can be just as fun!

3. What has your experience been like being a woman in the music industry?

You know, I don't have anything negative to say about my experience so far. I've felt respected as an artist from almost everyone I've personally come across in the industry. This being said, I'm very aware of the challenges females tend to face on a larger scale, especially in country. But I try to not let it phase me. In my mind, I'm just an artist…not a "female artist".

4. Growing up in Oregon, what/who inspired you to move to Nashville and write country music?

My earliest inspiration was definitely my aunt. She was singing country music professionally when I was super young, so I grew up seeing that and my family was super good about surrounding me with all sorts of music. My dad had this thing where he would always tell me to "listen to the words" and then at the end of the song I'd have to tell him what I thought it was about. It made me realize at a young age that music isn't just sound, it's stories. I fell in love with country music and its stories. Then came along these powerhouse female singer/songwriters…like Taylor Swift, and that was it. I knew it was something I wanted to do, and I knew Nashville was the place to do it. So, I learned the guitar, taught myself how to write, and made the move as soon as I possibly could! It's pretty much a 19 year old dream in the making at this point.

5. How has Nashville shaped your artistry and/or songwriting since moving there?

Nashville has already shaped my artistry and songwriting immensely. I think the biggest thing is being around so many talented artists and writers. It's super inspiring! Every time I go to a show or writer's round in town, I go home wanting to work even harder. That's the magic about Nashville. In a place where the industry could feel very competitive, the community is so amazing that instead of feeling intimidated, I feel inspired. I think that's so cool. Being able to learn your craft in an environment like that, where everybody is willing to collaborate and learn from each other. There's no room to sit still and not work hard. I think that alone has made me a better artist and writer. I've discovered my own unique writing style and sound, and can't wait to develop it even more.

6. What has your experience been like releasing your first single independently?

It's been amazing! I've had the best time with it. The process was so fun, and such a learning experience. Since it was my first release, I tried to go into it with little to no expectations and I've been blown away! The support I've received is beyond what I ever expected, and people are listening!! That's all I could've ever asked for. I think putting out music for any artist, independent or not, is always a little scary because there's this fear that people won't connect to such a personal part of you. There's so much work behind the scenes that goes into it. But it is so rewarding to read people's messages about how they connect or relate to the song. It's the best feeling in the world!

7. What are your future goals and aspirations within the music industry?

I ultimately just want to keep writing and putting out music that I love, and that other people love. Whether that's on a small scale level, or a larger scale. As long as I'm continuing to make music, I'm happy! That being said, I'd love to do some touring soon, and work towards my first EP/full length album.

8. Do you have plans to release new music soon?

Plans are in the works. I don't have a definitive date for you guys quite yet, but new music is on its way! I've been writing tons and I have some stuff that I'm dying to get out. I'd keep an eye out in the upcoming months for sure.

Listen to "The One" across all streaming platforms now and keep an eye out for future music from Hailey!


Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Poetry On Odyssey: Conjuring Prayers Towards The Aether Gods-Woven

These words effuse towards lambs of gods to absolve sins uncleaned

4
views

Salt-riddled droplets stream downwards

While conjuring gods-answerable words

Is wanting a bountiful increase

And the violence and temptations to cease

Too much for the flesh-and-blood to consume

And should we live with our earthly doom?

These words effuse towards never-ending lights

Beaming from cloud-estates where angels take their flight

O'er the buildings made from earth-as-hell fiends

Towards lambs of gods to absolve sins uncleaned

Who produce fleece for the aether gods-woven

That keeps Earth and the Heavens cloven

Tapestried beyond skies unflown and planets unmined

That bedazzles Men and makes devils blind

But are Men just devils-waiting-to-roast?

No matter how much they chest-beat and boast

Their compositions would decay with age

And their coffins would become their cages

No matter how much they pray, grovel, scream, and cry

Their gnashings-of-teeth might continue after they die

But, in sooth, the firmaments hear no songs

Since the clouds are not where angels belong

Nor do the heavens govern outer space

For bleak emptiness has humans to displace

Since they are ant-sapient dust

With their innovations easily given to rust

They live in this world of death and rot

And creativity is all they got


Image Attribution: Pixabay

Related Content

Facebook Comments