To The Mom Sending Her Daughter To College

To The Mom About To Send Her Daughter To College

You've been preparing me my whole life for this, and it's time to let go.

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18 years. 18 years of always being together, always coming home and shouting "Hey mom, I'm home!" and rambling on to tell you about my day and all of the semi-exciting things that happened. You've been my ranting buddy, my favorite shotgun rider, and my shoulder to cry on. We've gotten so used to being together that it seems crazy that I'm moving seven hours away in less than five months. Whenever I ask you if you're excited for me, you always try to smile and say, "Yes, I just want you to be safe and happy." I know you're worried about me going out into this big, scary world alone and you're sad to see me go, but it's time to let go. You've raised me to be ready for this moment, to venture out into the world and follow my dreams. It's scary for both of us to see me go off into the unknown, but with you in my heart, we'll always be together.

You've raised me to be strong, courageous, independent and motivated to succeed, and I will always carry these things with me wherever I go.

While you're letting me go, this isn't goodbye forever. I'll be home for the holidays, and I promise that if something even minorly important happens in my life, you'll know. Just because 500 miles separates us doesn't mean you won't be with me wherever I go.

I promise that my first and sole priority will be my education, as I've worked incredibly hard to be ready for this next phase of my education and chapter of my life.

I promise to protect myself and my heart and to watch out for my best interests in every situation.

I promise to eat a vegetable sometimes and to keep my dorm clean.

I promise to call home at least once a week (probably more, let's be real here) and to Facetime often.

This time is exciting and scary for both of us (change always is), but you've been preparing me my whole life for this, and I'm going to be just fine. Take heart knowing that I'm going to thrive in the unknown, taking new risks and working hard to succeed while exploring the world that I've been longing to see for so long. While 500 miles will separate us, I'll always remember everything you've instilled in me over the years, and you'll always be in my heart. It's time to let go.

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To The Nursing Major During The Hardest Week Of The Year

I know that no grade can possibly prove what kind of nurse you will be. I know that no assignment will showcase your compassion. I know that no amount of bad days will ever take away the empathy inside of you that makes you an exceptional nurse.

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To the Nursing Major During Finals Week,

I know you're tired, I know you're stressed, and I know you feel like you can't go on. I know that no part of this seems fair, and I know you are by far the biggest critic of yourself. I know that you've thought about giving up. I know that you feel alone. I know that you wonder why in the world you chose one of the hardest college majors, especially on the days it leaves you feeling empty and broken.

But, I also know that you love nursing school. I know your eyes light up when you're with patients, and I know your heart races when you think of graduation. I know that you love the people that you're in school with, like truly, we're-all-in-this-together, family type of love. I know that you look at the older nurses with admiration, just hoping and praying that you will remain that calm and composed one day. I know that every time someone asks what your college major is that you beam with pride as you tell them it's nursing, and I know that your heart skips a beat knowing that you are making a difference.

I know that no grade can possibly prove what kind of nurse you will be. I know that no assignment will showcase your compassion. I know that a failed class doesn't mean you aren't meant to do this. I know that a 'C' on a test that you studied so. dang. hard. for does not mean that you are not intelligent. I know that no amount of bad days will ever take away the empathy inside of you that makes you an exceptional nurse.

I know that nursing school isn't fair. I know you wish it was easier. I know that some days you can't remember why it's worth it. I know you want to go out and have fun. I know that staying up until 1:00 A.M. doing paperwork, only to have to be up and at clinicals before the sun rises is not fair. I know that studying this much only to be failing the class is hard. I know you wish your friends and family understood. I know that this is difficult.

Nursing school isn't glamorous, with the white lab coat and stethoscope. Nursing school is crying, randomly and a lot. Nursing school is exhaustion. Nursing school is drinking so much coffee that you lose track. Nursing school is being so stressed that you can't eat. Nursing school is four cumulative finals jam-packed into one week that is enough to make you go insane.

But, nursing school is worth it. I know that when these assignments are turned in and finals are over, that you will find the motivation to keep going. I know that one good day of making a difference in a patient's life is worth a hundred bad days of nursing school.

Keep hanging in there, nursing majors. It'll all be worth it— this I know, for sure.

So, if you have a nursing major in your life, hug them and tell them that you're proud of them. Nursing school is tough, nursing school is scary, and nursing school is overwhelming; but a simple 'thank-you' from someone we love is all we need to keep going.

Sincerely,

A third-year nursing student who knows

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My Mom Is The Reason I Know So Much About Baseball

So no, men are not the only ones who can teach their children about sports.

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For as long as I can remember, I have heard my mom talk about her love for baseball, specifically the Los Angeles Dodgers. Growing up, I always thought her love for the game was a little much, but in June 2016, I understood why she loved the game so much.

One of the most common stereotypes you come across is that men know sports, and women do not. But my mom and I can confidently say that is a misconception. Growing up, I was a little bit of the odd sibling, in that I did not want to perform. My dad has always been the entertainer. He loves to entertain people despite the fact that he is a doctor, but I guess that is entertaining people on some level. Both my sister and brother got their collegiate degrees within entertainment, but me, on the other hand, wanted to be away from the spotlight. So, I am happy my mom's love for the Dodgers rubbed off on me right before I headed off to college.

For the past three years, I have followed every pitch, every at-bat, and every catch done by the Dodgers. A little extra, right? Wrong. I saw a saying the other day that said, "Obsessed is what the lazy call the dedicated." So, I am just dedicated to the Dodgers. Since the Dodgers are on the west coast, and I am on the east coast, their games can go until 2:00 a.m. my time. And yes, it is not out of the ordinary for me and my mom to stay up that late, especially if it is a good game.

Being a woman who is planning to pursue a career in within sports medicine, it can be intimidating. I mean look at the MLB, do you see an equal amount of women to men that are a part of the medical staff? The answer is no. But that does not mean that women are not capable of being part of the staff.

Fun fact: The first female head athletic trainer in the MLB was Sue Falsone, and she was hired by the Dodgers. I got to sit down with the Dodgers' head athletic trainer over spring break to ask him some question about the career. Not only was he more than willing to show me around the training facility, but made sure to let me know that women are making their way into the industry and that it is not impossible. I even got a peek at one of the players and kept my cool, so now I know I am ready for this career.

The moral of the story is women can know just as much, if not more, about sports than men. And if you disagree, you are probably a man.

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