A Minority's Response To 'I Voted For Trump, And That Shouldn't Change Your Opinion Of Me'

A Minority's Response To 'I Voted For Trump, And That Shouldn't Change Your Opinion Of Me'

You can take that sticker off your laptop, I cannot take the skin off of my body.
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Your privilege is showing, but I'm here to fix that for you.

Before I begin, I want to warn you that I'm not going to hold back. As much as I want to write "I acknowledge your opinion and respect it," or "this isn't a personal attack on you," I just can't. Why? Because it's much more than just an opinion.

The article I'm responding to can be found at this link if anyone cares to read or respond, like myself. As much as I don't want to give this article more publicity, I feel it's only fair.

I remember reading this article and sending a screenshot of it to my girlfriend when it was first posted on Odyssey. Since this was before I became a creator, all I could do at the time was converse about it and express my distaste for it. Now, I can finally say to you how this makes myself, and other minorities all across the U.S. feel. I want you to know that my words in this post will carry anger, pain, frustration, and sadness that first began to stem in November of 2016.

To you, this was an election, but for us? This was a battle for our lives.

One thing I need to say is that if you are not a minority, then you will never know what it's like to be a minority. The author claims that people look at her differently for a sticker on her laptop, BUT PEOPLE LOOK AT ME DIFFERENTLY EVERY DAY FOR THE WAY I WAS BORN. With melanin-enriched skin and curly hair, I write this to you to in hopes that you realize that you can choose who you vote for, you cannot choose how you are born. You willingly voted for Trump, I did not willingly choose to be a minority. You can take that sticker off your laptop, I cannot take the skin off of my body.

If you begin to say that this isn't a race thing, know you're wrong.

It is a race thing when leaders of the Ku Klux Klan endorse Donald Trump. It is a race thing when people are yelling to "build a wall" at people who some, mind you, were born here. You think your vote does not affect us directly, but you are wrong.

It's a race thing, it's a poor thing, it's a women thing, it's a gay thing, it's a minority thing. Why? Because the person you voted for has in some way, shape, or form, verbally attacked or enacted laws that undermine or make it difficult for anyone in that category to live their life the way they should be able to.

To you, and everyone who believes that this election was a not a big deal. You will never understand what it's like to apply for a job and get rejected because of your name. What it's like to walk into an elevator and see someone clutch their bag. To be judged for having a natural hairstyle like dreadlocks, or to battle with yourself for years because society does not idolize you; they idolize those who have oppressed you. If you don't understand the message yet, it's that if you voted for Trump and boast about it, it is taken as a personal attack on who we are as a people.

You may not believe everything Trump has said, but when you vote for him, we take it as you ignoring every terrible and dividing thing he has said. Ignoring every problem that people who do not look like you face because you do not face them. That is where your privilege plays a part in this, and I want you to know that we will not stand for it.

Now, I can't necessarily be mad at you for not understanding. As it's recognizable by your article that you have not faced the same trials that I have growing up based on my skin, I cannot be mad simply because you are different than I am. That, in my opinion, is morally wrong. What I can be mad about though, is that judging by your article, you seem not to care about anyone else's problems in this country besides your own. Because as I just stated, if you voted for this person, then we take it as you ignoring every single thing he has said or done to damage a community of people.

I cannot respect your vote because your vote does not respect me. As much as I'm all for loving one another, respecting one another, and working out our differences, I cannot say that to you. As you continue to proudly show the Trump sticker on your laptop, I will proudly show the "F*** Trump" button on my book bag.

Besides you, know that every person who yells his name, boasts a sticker, shows off a shirt, or proudly holds a sign with his name, is launching a personal attack on whoever is a victim of his disgusting words and actions.

So, I invite you, and anyone for that matter, to respond to this article. I want to know your opinion so that I can remind you of the role you play in the oppression of minorities all across the U.S. I will make it my job on behalf of everyone who feels the same way I do, to remind you of how we feel. Sadly, it is not a burden that I asked for, but it's a burden that I will carry like many others that you do not.

I'm angry, I'm a minority, and I'm tired of you, and every other Trump supporter's shit.

Even if you do not show it intentionally, know that I will not stand for your ignorance. It would be a crime on behalf of every minority who feels the same way I do, and myself, if I let this go any longer. For centuries, anyone who has not fit the idolized category of White, Christian, heterosexual, and privileged (in that order) has had to deal with the pain of oppression. It's time we spoke up, and it's time you understand.

Sincerely,

A Minority

Cover Image Credit: Kory Longsworth

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Your Wait time At Theme Parks Is Not Unfair, You're Just Impatient

Your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself.

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Toy Story Land at Disney's Hollywood Studios "unboxed" on June 30, 2018. My friend and I decided to brave the crowds on opening day. We got to the park around 7 AM only to find out that the park opened around 6 AM. Upon some more scrolling through multiple Disney Annual Passholder Facebook groups, we discovered that people were waiting outside the park as early as 1 AM.

We knew we'd be waiting in line for the bulk of the Toy Story Land unboxing day. There were four main lines in the new land: the line to enter the land; the line for Slinky Dog Dash, the new roller coaster; the line for Alien Spinning Saucers, the easier of the new rides in the land; Toy Story Mania, the (now old news) arcade-type ride; and the new quick-service restaurant, Woody's Lunchbox (complete with grilled cheese and "grown-up drinks").

Because we were so early, we did not have to wait in line to get into the land. We decided to ride Alien Spinning Saucers first. The posted wait time was 150 minutes, but my friend timed the line and we only waited for 50 minutes. Next, we tried to find the line for Slinky Dog Dash. After receiving conflicting answers, the runaround, and even an, "I don't know, good luck," from multiple Cast Members, we exited the land to find the beginning of the Slinky line. We were then told that there was only one line to enter the park that eventually broke off into the Slinky line. We were not about to wait to get back into the area we just left, so we got a Fastpass for Toy Story Mania that we didn't plan on using in order to be let into the land sooner. We still had to wait for our time, so we decided to get the exclusive Little Green Man alien popcorn bin—this took an entire hour. We then used our Fastpass to enter the land, found the Slinky line, and proceeded to wait for two and a half hours only for the ride to shut down due to rain. But we've come this far and rain was not about to stop us. We waited an hour, still in line and under a covered area, for the rain to stop. Then, we waited another hour and a half to get on the ride from there once it reopened (mainly because they prioritized people who missed their Fastpass time due to the rain). After that, we used the mobile order feature on the My Disney Experience app to skip part of the line at Woody's Lunchbox.

Did you know that there is actually a psychological science to waiting? In the hospitality industry, this science is the difference between "perceived wait" and "actual wait." A perceived wait is how long you feel like you are waiting, while the actual wait is, of course, the real and factual time you wait. There are eight things that affect the perceived wait time: unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time, pre-process waits feel longer than in-process waits, anxiety makes waits feel longer, uncertain waits are longer than certain waits, unexplained waits are longer than explained waits, unfair waits are longer than equitable waits, people will wait longer for more valuable service and solo waiting feels longer than group waiting.

Our perceived wait time for Alien Spinning Saucers was short because we expected it to be longer. Our wait for the popcorn seemed longer because it was unoccupied and unexplained. Our wait for the rain to stop so the ride could reopen seemed shorter because it was explained. Our wait between the ride reopening and getting on the coaster seemed longer because it felt unfair for Disney to let so many Fastpass holders through while more people waited through the rain. Our entire wait for Slinky Dog Dash seemed longer because we were not told the wait time in the beginning. Our wait for our food after placing a mobile order seemed shorter because it was an in-process wait. We also didn't mind wait long wait times for any of these experiences because they were new and we placed more value on them than other rides or restaurants at Disney. The people who arrived at 1 AM just added five hours to their perceived wait

Some non-theme park examples of this science of waiting in the hospitality industry would be waiting at a restaurant, movie theater, hotel, performance or even grocery store. When I went to see "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom," the power went out in the theater right as we arrived. Not only did we have to wait for it to come back and for them to reset the projectors, I had to wait in a bit of anxiety because the power outage spooked me. It was only a 30-minute wait but felt so much longer. At the quick-service restaurant where I work, we track the time from when the guest places their order to the time they receive their food. Guests in the drive-thru will complain about 10 or more minute waits, when our screens tell us they have only been waiting four or five minutes. Their actual wait was the four or five minutes that we track because this is when they first request our service, but their perceived wait begins the moment they pull into the parking lot and join the line because this is when they begin interacting with our business. While in line, they are experiencing pre-process wait times; after placing the order, they experience in-process wait times.

Establishments in the hospitality industry do what they can to cut down on guests' wait times. For example, theme parks offer services like Disney's Fastpass or Universal's Express pass in order to cut down the time waiting in lines so guests have more time to buy food and merchandise. Stores like Target or Wal-Mart offer self-checkout to give guests that in-process wait time. Movie theaters allow you to check in and get tickets on a mobile app and some quick-service restaurants let you place mobile or online orders. So why do people still get so bent out of shape about being forced to wait?

On Toy Story Land unboxing day, I witnessed a woman make a small scene about being forced to wait to exit the new land. Cast Members were regulating the flow of traffic in and out of the land due to the large crowd and the line that was in place to enter the land. Those exiting the land needed to wait while those entering moved forward from the line. Looking from the outside of the situation as I was, this all makes sense. However, the woman I saw may have felt that her wait was unfair or unexplained. She switched between her hands on her hips and her arms crossed, communicated with her body language that she was not happy. Her face was in a nasty scowl at those entering the land and the Cast Members in the area. She kept shaking her head at those in her group and when allowed to proceed out of the land, I could tell she was making snide comments about the wait.

At work, we sometimes run a double drive-thru in which team members with iPads will take orders outside and a sequencer will direct cars so that they stay in the correct order moving toward the window. In my experience as the sequencer, I will inform the drivers which car to follow, they will acknowledge me and then still proceed to dart in front of other cars just so they make it to the window maybe a whole minute sooner. Not only is this rude, but it puts this car and the cars around them at risk of receiving the wrong food because they are now out of order. We catch these instances more often than not, but it still adds stress and makes the other guests upset. Perhaps these guests feel like their wait is also unfair or unexplained, but if they look at the situation from the outside or from the restaurant's perspective, they would understand why they need to follow the blue Toyota.

The truth of the matter is that your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself. We all want instant gratification, I get it. But in reality, we have to wait for some things. It takes time to prepare a meal. It takes time to experience a ride at a theme park that everyone else wants to go on. It takes time to ring up groceries. It takes patience to live in this world.

So next time you find yourself waiting, take a minute to remember the difference between perceived and actual wait times. Think about the eight aspects of waiting that affect your perceived wait. Do what you can to realize why you are waiting or keep yourself occupied in this wait. Don't be impatient. That's no way to live your life.

Cover Image Credit:

Aranxa Esteve

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With Liberty And Justice For All

Does granting justice to others mean we have to sacrifice our liberty?
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Like most public elementary school kids, I grew up saying the Pledge of Allegiance before the start of class every day. But to be honest, I always dreaded it. It was something extra we had to do. A box we had to check.

No one understood the true meaning of the words. As an eight-year-old, no one taught me what justice or liberty were. It wasn't until years later that I finally understood the true meaning of the words I said in a classroom so long ago.

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America…

To what are we pledging our allegiance, our loyalty to? The United States of America, sure. But what does that entail? Not many know. Does it mean to vote? Does it mean to fight in the military? Everyone has a different answer to that question. For me, the answer is to fight for the rights of migrants and other immigrants.

And to the republic for which it stands…

What exactly is our nation standing for? What are its values? Its beliefs? Does it involve treating those less fortunate than us with compassion? Or is it everybody for themselves?

One nation under God, indivisible…

Indivisible. United. Are we united? As a country are we united? On April 30, 2018, President Trump tweeted in response to a group of 1,200 migrants that traveled from Central America to seek a better life for their children. Only 200 of them, most of them children, desire asylum in the United States.

Asylum is a legal immigration process where those that have been victimized or fear being victimized in their home countries “based on their race, religion, nationality, political belief or membership in a particular group" can apply for a special type of visa to live in the United States.

According to his tweet, President Trump viewed the migrants as a prime example of how ineffective U.S. immigration laws are. On April 30, 2018, eight of the migrants were allowed to apply for asylum. This does not mean they will be granted citizenship. It simply means they are starting the process to legally enter U.S. borders.

With liberty and justice for all…

Many of the migrants want a better life for their kids. Many of them are fleeing their countries due to poverty and threats of violence from gang members. As a child, I never had to worry about sleeping on a cold, cement floor because my parents didn't make enough money. As a child, I never had to worry about my parents being threatened in the dead of night by a gang member, demanding something in exchange for my life. One thing is certain for these migrants: there is no going back.

Everyone deserves justice. It's easy to judge the situation from so many miles away. But I am not in their shoes. And neither are so many others. It's easy to dismiss what you can't see.

But what can I do? I have my own family, my own life to worry about. I have bills to pay just like everybody else. But what would you do if it was your kid? Your mother or father? Your friend who was treated without compassion when they entered another country?

Everyone deserves liberty. Does granting justice to others mean we have to sacrifice our liberty? Not necessarily. Not if we act. As corny as it sounds, not doing something is the worst thing to do. Vote. Write. Protest. Let your voice be heard. And one day, change may happen.

Cover Image Credit: Everypixel

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