Meet Meet George Brown

Meet Meet George Brown

Acoustic-Folk artist Meet George Brown just released her self-titled EP
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Meet George Brown: she is an indie-folk-rock artist born in Malaysia but living London, a mother of two, a songwriter, musician, and she goes by "Meet George Brown."

Inspired by California sunshine of the 60s and the contemporary indie-folk scene, Brown's storytelling style transforms the two sounds into one signature creation. Melodic acoustics combined with entrancing harmonies are only some the aspects that make her debut self-titled EP, released April 7th, pleasantly memorable.

Tell me about your music career!

I used to work in the City as an insurance broker, but a year and a half after I had my first little boy (who is now six), I realised that I needed to start pursuing my love of music. Not only for my own fulfillment but also to show him that you have to do whatever it is that you want to do regardless of whether you are good at it or not, and regardless of the result, but as long as you love doing it, have the passion for it and believe in it.

Brown began busking around London on the weekends in order to hone her performance skills. After securing a spot in a café, she met Felix Mackintosh, who recorded and produced the EP with the help of a successful IndieGoGo campaign.

What's the story behind your EP artwork?

Ha! No story behind the artwork except that I asked my very creative 6 year old to draw something to go on the cover of the CD.

Imagine your perfect do-nothing day. You wake up rested, and you spend all your time enjoying yourself, the sun, and the people who love you. That spirit of easy contentedness is easily captured in this light and joy-filled EP. "Heartbreaker" is a catchy dance-song-without-being-a-dance song, that will slide its way into your head and never lead. "What's It Like in Denver Today?" is another upbeat tune layered with wonderful lilts and whirls that give them the perfect amount of complexity and energy.

How would you define your music to someone who has never heard it before?

I would say that it is indie folk rock with a twist of '60s and '70s California. I would also specify the part of California being Laurel Canyon in LA but I am aware that not too people are aware of Laurel Canyon and its legacy. So I would also name my influences as being Joni Mitchell, Crosby Stills and Nash, James Taylor, The Eagles and perhaps a bit of Carole King, as well as some contemporary bands.

Then "Paper Hearts (Dancing in the Wind)" and "For C&C" are slower jams with that same complexity, but also provide a window to Brown's soul, as if you're listening to her life through her ears. The vocal harmonies are especially well-crafted and a joy to listen to.

What inspires you as an artist?

I would say that half of the songs are based on personal experience, and the other half are of everyday stories or experiences. So I think that the music is very relatable, or at least it is easy to empathise with the "characters" or the "protagonist" in the songs.


Go listen to the EP--Meet George Brown's album has a wonderfully whole and complete sound that will take up a place in your heart and your music library. We're already waiting in anticipation for her next album!

Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, listen on Spotify, and definitely buy the EP on iTunes and Amazon.


Cover Image Credit: Tigersonic Studios

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'Baby, It's Cold Outside' Is NOT About Date Rape, It's A Fight Against Social Norms Of The 1940s

The popular Christmas song shouldn't be considered inappropriate.

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The classic Christmas song "Baby, It's Cold Outside" has recently come under attack. There has been controversy over the song being deemed as inappropriate since it has been suggested that it promotes date rape. Others believe that the song is another common example of our culture's promotion of rape. You may be wondering, where did they get that idea from?

The controversy has led to one radio station, WDOK, taking the song off the air and banning it from their station. Some people believe that this song goes against the #MeToo movement since it promotes rape. However, people are not considering the fact that this traditional Christmas song was made in the 1940s.

People are viewing the song from a modern-day cultural perspective rather than from the perspective of the 1940s. "Baby, It's Cold Outside" was written in 1944. Many people have viewed the song from the perspective of our cultural and social norms. People believe that the song promotes date rape because of lyrics that suggest that the male singing is trying to stop the female singer from leaving, and the female singer is constantly singing about trying to escape with verses like "I really can't stay" or "I've got to go home."

When you first view the song from the perspective of today's culture, you may jump to the conclusion that the song is part of the date rape culture. And it's very easy to jump to this conclusion, especially when you are viewing only one line from the song. We're used to women being given more freedom. In our society, women can have jobs, marry and be independent. However, what everyone seems to forget is that women did not always have this freedom.

In 1944, one of the social norms was that women had curfews and were not allowed to be in the same house as a man at a later time. It was considered a scandal if a single woman so much as stayed at another man's house, let alone be in the same room together. It's mind-blowing, right? You can imagine that this song was probably considered very provocative for the time period.

"Baby, It's Cold Outside" is not a song that encourages date rape, but is actually challenging the social norms of society during the time period. When you listen to the song, you notice that at one part of the song, the female states, "At least I can say that I tried," which suggests that she really doesn't want to leave. In fact, most of the song, she is going back and forth the whole time about leaving stating, "I ought to say no…well maybe just a half a drink more," and other phrases.

She doesn't want to leave but doesn't really have a choice due to fear of causing a scandal, which would have consequences with how others will treat her. It was not like today's society where nobody cares how late someone stays at another man's house. Nowadays, we could care less if we heard that our single neighbor stayed over a single man's house after 7. We especially don't try to look through our curtain to check on our neighbor. Well, maybe some of us do. But back then, people did care about where women were and what they were doing.

The female singer also says in the lyrics, "The neighbors might think," and, "There's bound to be talk tomorrow," meaning she's scared of how others might perceive her for staying with him. She even says, "My sister will be suspicious," and, "My brother will be there at the door," again stating that she's worried that her family will find out and she will face repercussions for her actions. Yes, she is a grown woman, but that doesn't mean that she won't be treated negatively by others for going against the social norms of the time period.

Then why did the male singer keep pressuring her in the song? This is again because the song is more about challenging the social norms of the time period. Both the female and male singers in the song are trying to find excuses to stay and not leave.

On top of that, when you watch the video of the scene in which the song was originally viewed, you notice that the genders suddenly switch for another two characters, and now it's a female singer singing the male singer's part and vice versa. You also notice that the whole time, both characters are attracted to one another and trying to find a way to stay over longer.

Yes, I know you're thinking it doesn't matter about the genders. But, the song is again consensual for both couples. The woman, in the beginning, wants to stay but knows what will await if she doesn't leave. The male singer meanwhile is trying to convince her to forget about the rules for the time period and break them.

In addition, the complaint regarding the lyric "What's in this drink?" is misguided. What a lot of people don't understand is that back in 1944, this was a common saying. If you look at the lyrics of the song, you notice that the woman who is singing is trying to blame the alcoholic drink for causing her to want to stay longer instead of leaving early. It has nothing to do with her supposed fear that he may have tried to give her too much to drink in order to date rape her. Rather, she is trying to find something to blame for her wanting to commit a scandal.

As you can see, when you view the song from the cultural perspective of the 1940s, you realize that the song could be said to fight against the social norms of that decade. It is a song that challenges the social constrictions against women during the time period. You could even say that it's an example of women's rights, if you wanted to really start an argument.

Yes, I will admit that there were movies and songs made back in the time period that were part of the culture of date rape. However, this song is not the case. It has a historical context that cannot be viewed from today's perspective.

The #MeToo movement is an important movement that has led to so many changes in our society today. However, this is not the right song to use as an example of the date rape culture.

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Board Games Are More Important Than You Think They Are

They've become a defining part of my family.

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Remember when you were a kid and you'd have a family game night? Or your friends would come over and you'd open the game cabinet and play at least three different games together?

Maybe it's just me, but those are some of my best memories from my childhood. My family loves games, board games, and electronic games.

Of course, as I got older, gaming consoles like PlayStation and Wii became more and more popular. That meant that the game cabinet was opened less and less, collecting dust.

Thankfully, I live in New Jersey near the shore and Hurricane Sandy left my family with no power for five days. Sure, it was scary not having power and walking around my neighborhood seeing fallen trees or roof shingles, but we were inland enough to not have had any flood water damage.

No power also meant no PlayStation or Wii games. The gaming cabinet was opened again, this time with vigor. Now, four years later, and I still think about sitting in the dark with a flashlight playing Scrabble with my family.

That was also the week I learned how to play Yahtzee and dominated my dad in every game. My sister constantly was looking for someone to play her to Battleship. We exhausted Rummikub.

The game was already a family favorite, and that's including extended family. Family barbeques had been ending with late night games of Rummikub for at least a year by the time Sandy hit.

We were ready to strategize and crunch numbers, but after day three, we never wanted to a number ever again.

This semester, there's been a surge of board game love again in my family. My sister bought Jenga, which we are currently trying to exhaust ourselves with. My favorite board game also had a comeback: Life.

I loved this game so much that I had the SpongeBob version as a kid. I would play it with my best friend, just the two of us, playing game after game of Bikini Bottom themed Life. Now, I have a car full of "kids" that I've started to make pets in my head. I can handle having five pretend dogs, but not five pretend kids.

I don't know what it is about board games, but my family has always had an affinity for them. We've gone through our cycles of playing video games and card games, but we always come back to the classics. Maybe it's more a defining part of my family than I originally thought.

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