A Little Winter Cookbook

A Little Winter Cookbook

Inspring Recipes to Get Cooking Good Looking!
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Some days, I LOVE to cook. But most days all I want is to do is order Seamless, relax, and pretend I live in a world where I never have to cook again.

I spent all of last weekend working with an event planner at a man's home which is currently on the market for $22 million. Um, wait WHAT?! He has butlers, maids, and probably has never HAD to make a single meal in his life if he didn't want to. Unfortunately, most of us cannot afford to live in that luxury I so often dream about.

In order to get myself to eat better and cook more, I thought why not find some inspiring recipes that are easy to make, rich in nutrients, and that will be fun to put together! So I'm challenging you (myself included) to cook one fun and healthy recipe a week until winter ends and see how it goes.

Without further ado, here's a few things at the top of my list to make this winter.



Butternut Squash and Sage Risotto with Goat Cheese

This yummy risotto uses one of my favorite winter squashes and the best cheese. The dish is also vegetarian and gluten free, so it can be eaten by almost anyone! (Click on the photo for a link to this yummy dinner.)





Roasted Beetroot, Walnut, & Goat Cheese Salad

Can you tell I like goat cheese yet? Truthfully, I've already made this quite a few times. But to get myself to buy all the ingredients is still a challenge! Want to make it even better? Caramelize the walnuts. SUGAR IS EVERYTHING.





Orecchiette with Baked Chicken Meatballs in Tomato Cream Sauce

This is a little extra tastier than the classic pasta with tomato sauce. Using all fresh ingredients, I can't wait to make this! Besides... you can never really go wrong with pasta of any kind.




And thats it! Hope these recipes inspire you to GET COOKING!

Xx Madi

(That usually fashion writer who loves food and decided to cook instead of shop this week)


Cover Image Credit: Google Images

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​21 Things You Need To Do The Year You Turn 21

Cheers to twenty-fun!
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There’s a reason people call 21 "twenty-fun." This is one of those years that has the potential to beat all others. All you need are some great friends, a spirit hungry for adventure, and this list of 21 crucial things to fill your year with.

1. Get carded as often as possible.

There’s pretty much no better feeling than when you’re finally 21 and you can order drinks with no fear of being turned down.

2. Tell people what you want with #NoRagrets.

This year is no longer the year to hold in your thoughts out of fear that you don’t deserve what you want. Decide on your dreams (life, career, whatever) and shout them from the rooftops.

3. Find your “Go to Hell” outfit.

You know the one – that outfit you feel so good in that you could tell literally anyone to “go to hell” without blinking an eye. Yep. Buy it. Own it. Kill it.

4. Experience more than normal.

Look at life through someone else’s eyes, visit another country, practice empathy. There’s more to life than black and white. Just experience a little more than your normal. You’ll be a better person for it.

5. Kill the LinkedIn game.

It’s cool to be professional AF.

6. Go on a few dates.

With your significant other, mom, dad, best friends, that stranger you’ve been crushing on, yourself.

7. Learn how to be comfortable with uncomfortable.

Not everything is going to be your cup of tea and not everyone is going to be exactly like you. Learn to appreciate everyone’s differences and your days will get a little brighter.

8. Find a quality genre of music and stick with it.

Top 40 is cool and all, but there are so many genres out there so don’t be afraid to grow your musical palette.

9. Treat yo-damn-self.

To a nice meal out. To those new shoes. To that second Starbucks. To that big piece of cake. To that crazy concert. Self-love is important, too.

10. Strike up conversations with as many strangers as you can.

You never know who you could meet if you just take a second to talk to the person in line in front of you or walking the same way as you. This is the age to form good networking habits.

11. Explain why your license isn’t flipped the ‘right’ way.

Yes, you’re really 21. You just haven’t gotten your new flipped ID yet.

12. Make your forever friends.

What’s life without your forever friends?

13. Gym so hard.

Hit up the gym and eat some spinach every once in a while. It’s good for ya.

14. Buy your parents drinks.

Imagine how funny (or scaring) it’ll be hearing your dad tell the hot bartender some of his ‘high-quality’ dad jokes.

15. Splurge a little money.

Like I said before, treat yo-damn-self.

16. Save a little money.

But, treat yo-damn-self within reason. Your future self will thank you.

17. Always give a solid tip at restaurants.

A nice tip can go a long way… and I mean the monetary kind.

18. Perfect your Insta game.

Juno? Ludwig? Valencia? Choose your favorite filter and throw it over everything. Whether it be your #foodie lunch or your beach pics, find your ~aesthetic~ and stick with it.

19. Make sure your jerk radar is properly calibrated.

This will get you so far in life and save you so much wasted time.

20. Cross a few things off your bucket list.

If you don’t have a bucket list, now’s the time to make one and start checking things off one-by-one. You’ll never realize how much you’ve really done until you see a big list with a bunch of marks through it.

21. Live. A lot.

Okay, so maybe 9+10 is not 21 (#RIPVine), but this is a huge year for you. This might be your last big birthday before the big 5-0 so make sure you’re always living every moment to the fullest.

Cover Image Credit: Lauren LeBouef

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10 Fish That You Can Add To Your New Desktop Aquarium

Even with their small size, they can still be beautifully decorated with pieces of driftwood, small stones, artificial or live plants and/or aquarium safe décor.

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A desktop aquarium adds natural beauty and life into any office, dorm room or apartment. Desktop aquariums are 10-gallons or less and generally used to house small freshwater fish. Even with their small size, they can still be beautifully decorated with pieces of driftwood, small stones, artificial or live plants and/or aquarium safe décor.

It's important to note that tanks less than three gallons should be avoided since they are harder to maintain, and there are very few fish that can live in such a small environment. A desktop aquarium can still be low maintenance if you don't overfeed the fish or overstock the tank. The one inch per gallon rule helps to determine how many peaceful community fish (up to two inches) you can keep in your tank. To avoid overfeeding, only feed as much as they can eat in one minute or two to three medium flakes or two to four 1mm pellets for each one–two-inch fish. If you have a local pet store in your area that specializes in aquariums, try taking a visit there since they often have fish and supplies that you won't find elsewhere. People who work at local fish stores also tend to have more experience in the hobby than those at Petsmart or Petco. Here are the top ten easiest and most beautiful fish for a desktop aquarium.

1. White Cloud Mountain Minnow

White Clouds have a silvery white stripe down their lateral line and red fins and grow to be about 1.5 inches. They prefer cool waters, 64°-72°F (18°-22°C) with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. They can live in tanks as small as five-gallons and don't require a heater. White Clouds also prefer a strong current, so a sponge filter isn't the best option. They will readily accept most flakes, micro pellets and freeze-dried foods available for small community fish.

2. Betta/Siamese Fighting fish

Bettas are a super popular beginner fish that can live in just a gallon of water. They don't require aeration because they have a labyrinth organ that allows them to take in air when the dissolved oxygen level is low. Bettas come in a rainbow of different colors and a wide variety of tail patterns from veil tail to crown tail to Twin Tail. They require warmer waters between 75° and 86°F (24°-30°C) with a pH between 6.0 and 8.0. Male Bettas should be kept alone, without any tank-mates, if they are in tanks less than 10 gallons. Female bettas can be kept in groups of odd numbers if they are in a tank over 5-gallons. Male Bettas also shouldn't be kept in the same tank without a divider (hence the name Siamese Fighting Fish). They are carnivores and should be fed pellets and occasionally freeze-dried brine shrimp or bloodworms.

3. Endler's Livebearer

The Endler's livebearer is a very colorful and tiny tropical fish that can thrive in a small aquarium. Endler's livebearers look like guppies, but smaller, only growing up to an inch long. These fish come in a variety of brilliant colors and patterns, ranging from red to neon green or yellow with cobra pattern. They can live in water temperatures from 64°- 82°F(18°-28°C) with a pH between 5.5 and 8.0. Endler's livebearers are omnivores and should have a diet of flakes and freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, or brine shrimp.

4. Chili Rasbora

The Chili Rasbora is an easy-to-keep fish that displays a brilliant ruby red color with a black stripe. Chili Rasboras are schooling fish that should be kept in groups of five or more. Since they only grow to a little under an inch, they are suitable for really small tanks. Chili rasboras prefer temperatures from 68°-82°F(18°-28°C), pH from 4-7 and low water flow-since they are so tiny. They accept micro-pellets, crushed flakes, and baby brine shrimp or cyclopods.

5. Sparkling Gourami

The Sparkling Gourami is another beautiful yet hardy fish for a small tank. These fish have a golden body with specks of iridescent red and fins with blue and green spots. Like bettas, they are a Labyrinth fish and do fine in lower dissolved oxygen levels. These fish grow to be about 1.5 inches. They prefer temperatures between 77 °F and 83 °F (25 °-28 °C), a pH between 6.0 and 7.5 and lots of plants. Sparkling Gourami should be fed algae-based flake foods along with freeze-dried bloodworms or brine shrimp.

6. Japanese Ricefish/Medaka

Japanese Ricefish can live on cooler water from 64° to 72°F and are very adaptable to different water parameters. They grow to be about 1.5 inches long and will accept a variety of dry and frozen foods as well as vegetable matter. They prefer densely planted tanks.

7. Fancy Guppy

Fancy guppies are very popular for small aquariums. They grow to be two inches long come in a very wide range of colors, from purple to lemon yellow to red to cobra etc. Fancy guppies should be kept in a tank of at least five gallons with water temperature 64-82° F, and pH 5.5-8.0. They will readily accept flakes, micro-pellets, and freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, or brine shrimp. Guppies are also relatively easy to breed.

8. Rosy Loach

Rosy loaches grow to be between one and 1.5 inches long. Males are light pink/peach in color and females are grey with a black stripe. They can be kept in tanks as small as three gallons with a temperature of 68-78°F and a pH from 6-8. Rosy loaches prefer to be kept in planted tanks. They can be fed sinking pellets or tablets and occasionally some daphnia, blood worms, or brine shrimp.

9. Clown Killifish

Clown Killifish have yellow and black vertical bars and a blue and red striped tail. They should be kept in a tank that is at least five gallons. A lid is highly recommended since they are jumpers. The water temperature should be between 73 and 79° F and a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They prefer brine shrimp and tubifex, but will also accept flake foods.

10. Pygmy cory catfish

While catfish are not a good option for small tanks, the Pygmy Cory is an exception. They have a stripe that runs the length of their body and grows to be only an inch long. Pygmy Cories prefer to be in groups and should be kept in a tank with a sandy substrate for them to sift through. The water temperature from 72-79°F with a pH between 6.4 and 7.4. They will accept a diet of sinking pellets and freeze-dried foods.

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