32 Lyrics From Lauren Daigle's 'Look Up Child' That Will Put You Squarely In Your Feels

32 Lyrics From Lauren Daigle's 'Look Up Child' That Will Put You Squarely In Your Feels

"I cannot earn what you so freely give."

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On Friday, September 7th, Lauren Daigle came out with her long-awaited album, "Look Up Child" and honestly, it was everything I needed to hear and there were so many things that I need to be reminded of more often than I'd like to admit. So many things she says in her songs have been things that have stuck with me all week. Rather than just picking from one song, here's a full list of lyrics from every song off the album that hit me right in my feels.

1 – 2: "Still Rolling Stones" 

"The darkness should've known You're still rolling stones."

"I thought I was too far gone, for everything I've done wrong. I'm the one who dug this grave, but You called my name."

3 – 5: "Rescue"

"I will send out an army to find You in the middle of the darkness. It's true, I will rescue You."

"I will never stop marching to reach You in the middle of the hardest fight."

"I hear You whisper You have nothing left."

6 – 8: "This Girl"

"I'm still learning to be still."

"I searched the world to find my heart is Yours."

"I searched the world to find what I'm looking for, I want nothing more."

9 – 10: "Your Wings"

"With every step that I take, You are before and behind me."

"You're my covering, I'm safe."

11 – 13: "You Say"

"You say I am loved when I can't feel a thing."

"The only thing that matters now is everything You think of me."

"In You I find my worth, in You I find my identity."

14 – 15: "Everything"

"You tell the seasons when it's time for them to turn, so I will trust You even when it hurts."

"When I'm weak, You are mighty. You are everything I need."

16 – 18: "Love Like This"

"I cannot earn what You so freely give."

"What have I done to deserve love like this?"

"When I am a wasteland, You are the water."

19 – 21: "Look Up Child"

"Where are You now when the world is crumbling?"

"I hear You say 'Look up child.'"

"I know You're in control, even in our suffering."

22 – 23: "Losing My Religion"

"It all seems so insincere. I'd trade it all to meet You here."

"I need something different, and different looks like You."

24 – 26: "Remember"

"In the darkest hour when I cannot breathe, fear is on my chest, the weight of the world on me. Everything is crashing down, everything I had known, when I wonder if I'm all alone."

"I remember You have always been faithful to me."

"I have seen giants fall, I have seen mountains move, I have seen waters part, because of You."

27 – 28: "Rebel Heart"

"I don't want to fight You anymore, so take this rebel heart and make it Yours."

"Your love is like an arrow straight and true, and now this rebel heart belongs to You."

29 – 30: "Inevitable"

"Father, even then my song will be. I know You will always carry me. It's inevitable."

"Set Your promise to play on repeat in my head. When You meet my anxiety, put it to death."

31 – 32: "Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus"

"Turn your eyes upon Jesus. Look full in His wonderful face, and the things of earth will grow strangely dim in the light of His glory and grace."

"Through death into life everlasting, He passed, and we follow Him there."

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'Baby, It's Cold Outside' Is NOT About Date Rape, It's A Fight Against Social Norms Of The 1940s

The popular Christmas song shouldn't be considered inappropriate.

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The classic Christmas song "Baby, It's Cold Outside" has recently come under attack. There has been controversy over the song being deemed as inappropriate since it has been suggested that it promotes date rape. Others believe that the song is another common example of our culture's promotion of rape. You may be wondering, where did they get that idea from?

The controversy has led to one radio station, WDOK, taking the song off the air and banning it from their station. Some people believe that this song goes against the #MeToo movement since it promotes rape. However, people are not considering the fact that this traditional Christmas song was made in the 1940s.

People are viewing the song from a modern-day cultural perspective rather than from the perspective of the 1940s. "Baby, It's Cold Outside" was written in 1944. Many people have viewed the song from the perspective of our cultural and social norms. People believe that the song promotes date rape because of lyrics that suggest that the male singing is trying to stop the female singer from leaving, and the female singer is constantly singing about trying to escape with verses like "I really can't stay" or "I've got to go home."

When you first view the song from the perspective of today's culture, you may jump to the conclusion that the song is part of the date rape culture. And it's very easy to jump to this conclusion, especially when you are viewing only one line from the song. We're used to women being given more freedom. In our society, women can have jobs, marry and be independent. However, what everyone seems to forget is that women did not always have this freedom.

In 1944, one of the social norms was that women had curfews and were not allowed to be in the same house as a man at a later time. It was considered a scandal if a single woman so much as stayed at another man's house, let alone be in the same room together. It's mind-blowing, right? You can imagine that this song was probably considered very provocative for the time period.

"Baby, It's Cold Outside" is not a song that encourages date rape, but is actually challenging the social norms of society during the time period. When you listen to the song, you notice that at one part of the song, the female states, "At least I can say that I tried," which suggests that she really doesn't want to leave. In fact, most of the song, she is going back and forth the whole time about leaving stating, "I ought to say no…well maybe just a half a drink more," and other phrases.

She doesn't want to leave but doesn't really have a choice due to fear of causing a scandal, which would have consequences with how others will treat her. It was not like today's society where nobody cares how late someone stays at another man's house. Nowadays, we could care less if we heard that our single neighbor stayed over a single man's house after 7. We especially don't try to look through our curtain to check on our neighbor. Well, maybe some of us do. But back then, people did care about where women were and what they were doing.

The female singer also says in the lyrics, "The neighbors might think," and, "There's bound to be talk tomorrow," meaning she's scared of how others might perceive her for staying with him. She even says, "My sister will be suspicious," and, "My brother will be there at the door," again stating that she's worried that her family will find out and she will face repercussions for her actions. Yes, she is a grown woman, but that doesn't mean that she won't be treated negatively by others for going against the social norms of the time period.

Then why did the male singer keep pressuring her in the song? This is again because the song is more about challenging the social norms of the time period. Both the female and male singers in the song are trying to find excuses to stay and not leave.

On top of that, when you watch the video of the scene in which the song was originally viewed, you notice that the genders suddenly switch for another two characters, and now it's a female singer singing the male singer's part and vice versa. You also notice that the whole time, both characters are attracted to one another and trying to find a way to stay over longer.

Yes, I know you're thinking it doesn't matter about the genders. But, the song is again consensual for both couples. The woman, in the beginning, wants to stay but knows what will await if she doesn't leave. The male singer meanwhile is trying to convince her to forget about the rules for the time period and break them.

In addition, the complaint regarding the lyric "What's in this drink?" is misguided. What a lot of people don't understand is that back in 1944, this was a common saying. If you look at the lyrics of the song, you notice that the woman who is singing is trying to blame the alcoholic drink for causing her to want to stay longer instead of leaving early. It has nothing to do with her supposed fear that he may have tried to give her too much to drink in order to date rape her. Rather, she is trying to find something to blame for her wanting to commit a scandal.

As you can see, when you view the song from the cultural perspective of the 1940s, you realize that the song could be said to fight against the social norms of that decade. It is a song that challenges the social constrictions against women during the time period. You could even say that it's an example of women's rights, if you wanted to really start an argument.

Yes, I will admit that there were movies and songs made back in the time period that were part of the culture of date rape. However, this song is not the case. It has a historical context that cannot be viewed from today's perspective.

The #MeToo movement is an important movement that has led to so many changes in our society today. However, this is not the right song to use as an example of the date rape culture.

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19 Signs You Grew Up Lutheran

Confirmation 2013, what a time.

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Switching from the blue to the maroon hymnal was a BIG deal and we love our beer. What else do you really need to know about growing up Lutheran?

1. You remember switching from the blue to the maroon hymnal. 

And it was a biiiiigggggg deal. I know that those older Lutherans even remember the red hymnal.

2. You have a family member that  has probably been drinking beer for your entire life. 

We're German, we're Lutheran. We love our beer. My dad even brews it.

3. You had to go through all of the stages of Confirmation. 

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Ah yes, whether it was memorizing the Small Catechism or trying to explain to your friends that you're not Catholic, confirmation is something that every good Lutheran remembers. And have you ever tried explaining the concept to a non-Lutheran? "It's like baptism... but it's not"

4. The Chilli Cook-off. 

I don't know if this is solely a Lutheran thing, but in every church I've been to, there's a chili cook-off.

5. You have memorized all of the liturgy. 

So much to the point that other denominations believe that you are a cult.

6. You're obsessed with Martin Luther.

And you probably know all 99 Theses.

7. And also with you. 

If you know, you know.

8. Old hymns are the best thing since sliced bread.

We're Lutheran, we love our hymns. And we love the old woman who belts out all of them out of key even MORE.

9. No singing of "Hallelujah" until Easter. 

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You ever been through lent? What a depressing time.

10. If there's a meeting, there's a potluck. 

11. You're used to sitting down and singing. 

"Stand up, stand up for Jesus"... We're singing... while sitting down.

12. You get a workout in during the service. 

Up, down, up, down, up, down.

13. The triangle is a secret symbol.

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"Why is everyone standing except for me? Oh, the triangle... the triangle.."

14. You get to drink at communion.

"That ain't no grape juice, girl" - my mom.

15. "HE IS RISEN INDEED HALLELUJAH!" 

Easter Sunday is truly a beautiful thing and somehow everybody already knows what to say.

16. You know what the LWML is.

Gotta love those LWML ladies.

17. You can identify the church season the characters are in when you're watching movies. 

18. Hymnal ribbons are toys. 

They're fun for braiding.

19. The big white dress. 

Technically it's called an Alb, but If you know, you also know. And no, it's not a wedding.

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