Let It Be Known That A Hate Crime Is A Hate Crime–NOT A 'Racially-Charged Attack'

Let It Be Known That A Hate Crime Is A Hate Crime–NOT A 'Racially-Charged Attack'

Jussie Smollett was attacked early Tuesday morning in Chicago. The incident is being investigated as a possible hate crime.

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Jussie Smollett, an actor known for his role on "Empire", was hospitalized early Tuesday morning following an attack in Chicago. The Chicago Police Department reports that Smollett, a black and openly gay man, was attacked by two offenders who shouted racist and homophobic slurs at him. The two offenders then continued to batter him, pouring an unknown chemical substance on him and tying a rope around his neck.

After the two assailants fled the scene, Smollett was able to check himself in at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. The police report describes his condition as "good." The Chicago Police Department are "taking this investigation very seriously and are treating it as a possible hate crime."

The FBI has reported that hate crimes have risen gradually over the past few years. We are seeing a dangerous trend where more people are attacked for their race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, and gender identity. In 2014, there were 6,681 victims of hate crimes while the number increased to 8,493 victims in 2017.

Senior writer at Rolling Stone comments on incident.https://twitter.com/JamilSmith/status/109031165683...

Jussie Smollett was not the victim of a racially-charged attack, but the victim of a hate crime. Police have a video of Smollet entering a hotel with a noose around his neck. For someone to say this attack was racially-charged is a bit of an understatement.

In 2019, we are still seeing minority groups being attacked for their identity or for their skin color. When I hear someone say that our generation is "sensitive and weak" for taking up such pressing social issues; I can't help but laugh because just 60 years ago, they were the ones who got upset if a person of color used the same water fountain as them. They, clearly, were the ones who needed "safe spaces."

While racism isn't blatantly displayed anymore, as it was with the implementation and long continuation of Jim Crow laws, we still see the remnants of such hateful rhetoric in the form of political commentary and of course, hate crimes themselves.

As we watch this investigation unfold, we are most likely going to see this attack downplayed. But don't be mistaken, this was most definitely a hate crime.

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I Don't Want Your Apology For Saying The N-Word, I Want You To Stop Saying It

Are you actually sorry for your actions or is it just normal to apologize?

hannahd
hannahd
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The word sorry just doesn't hold as much meaning as it used to me feel like.

When we were younger we used to apologize for hitting another kid or if you knocked down a kid at recess. One of the definitions for sorry was "feeling distressed, especially through sympathy with someone else's misfortune." The other definition they had stated "feeling regret or penitence."

I don't know about you guys but I have been one to apologize a lot, heck I even say sorry when I don't notice someone behind me when the door closes behind me. Now we're going to turn the tables BIG time and how when people think it's OK to say the N-word jokingly and then notice I am in the room and apologize.

Heck yes, we are going to talk about this.

When apologizing to someone to you truly mean it or do you just say it because you're used to immediately apologizing because that is the normal thing to do? If you were truly apologizing you'd give reason to it, but people just say sorry to get out of an argument or even avoid one. If you think someone is mad at you, you don't even bother really asking what happened you just apologized to avoid the confrontation.

Call me crazy but sometimes some good old confrontation is just what the doctor ordered. You could be having all these pent-up feelings and emotions that sorry just won't patch up. Even if it does patch them up, imagine that it's a bandage and you just got in the shower, now the bandage is useless and to me that how I see the word sorry!

That is personally just me because people have apologized (including myself) and saying sorry really isn't crap anymore. I have got to the point where people say sorry I say, "you really aren't sorry." Depending on the situation if you were sorry you would not have done whatever it is in the first place.

Now, if that isn't a hard pill to swallow, then I don't know what is.

Now if you are apologizing to someone for their misfortune that is an entire different situation in which the sorry could be sincere, which I hope it is and you are being a heartless witch and if you are, then you need to step back and get it together because at that point you're being rude and shouldn't be around that person, to begin with.

Now, the "N" word. Let's get awkward, shall we? People say a lot "Oh, I would never say that around you." Keywords there you guys is "around you." PLEASE tell me why you wouldn't say it around me? Oh, I know why, because you don't want to hurt my feelings right? Exactly my point. You won't say the word around me but you have your group messages named things like "My N****s" or something like that, am I right? I know I'm right because I've seen it. People have shown me their phones and a group message will pop up on their phone or their Snapchat and I will see it and they will say sorry.

No, if you were sorry you wouldn't have named the group chat that.

You are apologizing because you ASSUME that I'll go off on you or you hurt my feelings. The N-word came from the eighth century as an adaptation of the Spanish "negro." By the mid-20th century, it was used as an unambiguously racist insult. Basically, the entire point of this is that it is DISRESPECTFUL. Even when you say "Oh, my black friend so-and-so" like yes, I am black, thanks for telling me as if I didn't know? I find it very funny that people are SO quick to defend their friends of color when someone else might call them or use the N-word but are even quicker to use it when they aren't around. Being black already makes us stand out enough we don't need people calling us racial slurs on top of it. We have names, try using them once in a while and stop apologizing for things you aren't sorry for.

The whole point of this was to show you what "sorry" can really mean or not mean in some circumstances.

Next time you think something might hurt someone, take a look in the mirror and try to put them in your shoes. This is something we all need to practice. I find myself saying sorry for things that I don't really think about much either.

"If you have no critics you'll likely have no success" — Malcolm X
hannahd
hannahd

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Ariana Grande Is An Icon

Even if you aren't into her music, Ariana Grande seems to be on top of the world right now.

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Ariana Grande is in no way a newcomer to the music industry. She has been releasing music for years and has always been very successful. She toured with Justin Bieber, had a few popular songs and was even on a Nickelodeon show. It hasn't been until recently that, in my opinion, she has hit icon status.

We all remember the Manchester bombing at one of Ariana Grande's shows back in 2017. Her very public engagement failed and her long-term ex-boyfriend Mac Miller committed suicide at the end of 2018. Clearly, she has been through a lot. Naturally, all of these tragic events gained her a ton of publicity.

In August of 2018, she released her fourth studio album "Sweetener." It was wildly successful and on February 10th earned Grande her very first Grammy Award. Just five months after the release of "Sweetener," she dropped her fifth album titled "thank u, next." To me, this is the album that is officially putting her on top. Her first single from the album titled "thank u, next" became her very first number one song. The song became an anthem for our generation. Even if you don't particularly like the song, I can almost guarantee you have heard it at least once. After the release of the single and very notable music video, Grande decided to release a song titled "7 Rings." This playful track allows listeners to hear the diva side of Ariana Grande but in a good way. With no surprise, this became her second number one song.

Her world tour begins next month and I already have my tickets. It is interesting to see such a young artist in what seems to be the peak of her career. Ariana Grande has become a household name similar to Christina Aguilera and Britney Spears. It seems as if the whole world is waiting to see what the pop star will do next!

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