Why Jim And Pam From "The Office" Are The Best Role-Models For A Relationship

Why Jim And Pam From "The Office" Are The Best Role-Models For A Relationship

Who knew "The Office" could present such deep insights about relationships?
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Every sitcom has romance in some capacity, whether serious or not. "Friends," "Parks and Recreation," "How I Met Your Mother," etcetera. We not only get to see the hilarities of the characters' day-to-day activities, but we also see some or all of them fall in love. "The Office" also falls under this category, but something has always distinguished this show in my mind regarding love and relationships. I never truly understood it until I finished all 10 seasons. (I stopped for a while after season eight, but decided to finish it to see the finale.)

The main romance in the show is between Jim Halpert and Pam Beasley. Similarly to many other tv shows, a few seasons go by before they get together. The show provides the realistic excitement of Pam almost getting married, Jim confessing his love, kissing Pam, and then being rejected. He leaves for a while for another job and Pam calls off her wedding. After having relationships with other people for a season, they finally get together, fulfilling the typical waiting period that most shows follow because it can never be easy.

The beauty of their relationship is how normal it is. There's no such thing a perfect timing. Jim tells Pam he loves her weeks before her wedding and gets rejected. It's awkward. Not just that, it's real-life awkward. When they're dating long-distance Jim proposes to Pam at a gas station in the rain. There's no ceremony, no huge gesture, just two people in love living the most normal life any of us could imagine. It's not like Ben's proposal to Leslie on "Parks and Recreation" (though I adore that show), where he comes to their new house just at the perfect moment to catch Leslie by surprise. The writers of the show used the normalcy that they embraced throughout the entire show to provide us with realistic characters in love. Jim and Pam's lives are so utterly normal that the problems they face are those that we can face, such as how divorcing parents affect your romantic relationship.

This approach on Jim and Pam's relationship allowed the writers to display how a couple that learned to love each other through faces problems they cannot control Before their marriage, Jim and Pam also faced a challenge that occurs to some people as well: an unplanned pregnancy. Many shows give an unplanned pregnancy a negative connotation. Usually, there is deliberation regarding what the couple will "decide." "The Office" puts this term in a positive light. After finding out, both Jim and Pam are so incredibly happy. For the rest of the show they use the term in a positive manner, explaining how their child, though "unplanned," was wanted. Jim and Pam show us that a child is not only a blessing but also a greater fulfillment and representation of the love shared between them. They had plans set for their lives, but their openness to children at any time allowed for them start a family in the midst of any career goals they possessed.

In many sitcoms, after the characters that are "meant to be" fall in love, there are usually no further serious issues between them. They have to deal with other problems that don't revolve around their relationship. Marriage seems to be the ultimate fix, but that's unrealistic and we all should know that by now. The final season of "The Office" provided TV viewers with one of the most beautiful aspects of love and a committed relationship: the ability to rekindle love and romance after it seems to be fading. This is a necessary aspect of all relationships. The beginning of a relationship is called "the honeymoon phase" for a reason. Relationships are difficult, and loving someone is a choice. It's not fate. It's not destiny. It's a choice that two people make every day.

In the final season, as Jim works in a different city, the long-distance nature of their relationship starts to take a toll. We see both Jim and Pam start to lose faith in their marriage, thinking that they are falling out of love. This struggle continues the entire season. At a certain point they make a choice to try to stay together and go to marriage counseling. As they try the monotonous counseling exercises for a while it seems as though nothing is working. Then the writers give us one of the most heartfelt scenes I have ever viewed. As Jim is about to get in a taxi for his job in Philadelphia, Pam runs out of the office building to give him his umbrella. After Jim takes it he looks at Pam and then hugs her. They just hug. It's awkward for a while watching these two people who seemed "no longer in love" interact in such a way, but then they both know why they're together. A clip of their wedding and their vows appears for a few seconds, and they are reminded of the vow they made: to love and stay with each other for the rest of their lives. Once again, no huge romantic gesture, no easy fix. Their love is as difficult and even awkward at times as it is in reality.

Sadly, we live in a society where divorces occur so often that people always think they will have a way out when life gets difficult. Having a sitcom present a couple that makes it through what may end many relationships or marriages is beautiful and necessary in today's culture. It's what we need to see more of in our society. We need more people and couples who acknowledge that difficulty is a part of life and love. Love isn't like the movies or most TV shows. Jim and Pam give us an incredible example of how to love in a world where the crazy scenarios in television and movies probably won't happen to us. We need to learn how to love in reality, not fantasy, and "The Office" gave us some solid guidelines.

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I'm A Woman And You Can't Convince Me Breastfeeding In Public Is OK In 2019

Sorry, not sorry.

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Lately, I have seen so many people going off on social media about how people shouldn't be upset with mothers breastfeeding in public. You know what? I disagree.

There's a huge difference between being modest while breastfeeding and just being straight up careless, trashy and disrespectful to those around you. Why don't you try popping out a boob without a baby attached to it and see how long it takes for you to get arrested for public indecency? Strange how that works, right?

So many people talking about it bring up the point of how we shouldn't "sexualize" breastfeeding and seeing a woman's breasts while doing so. Actually, all of these people are missing the point. It's not sexual, it's just purely immodest and disrespectful.

If you see a girl in a shirt cut too low, you call her a slut. If you see a celebrity post a nude photo, you call them immodest and a terrible role model. What makes you think that pulling out a breast in the middle of public is different, regardless of what you're doing with it?

If I'm eating in a restaurant, I would be disgusted if the person at the table next to me had their bare feet out while they were eating. It's just not appropriate. Neither is pulling out your breast for the entire general public to see.

Nobody asked you to put a blanket over your kid's head to feed them. Nobody asked you to go feed them in a dirty bathroom. But you don't need to basically be topless to feed your kid. Growing up, I watched my mom feed my younger siblings in public. She never shied away from it, but the way she did it was always tasteful and never drew attention. She would cover herself up while doing it. She would make sure that nothing inappropriate could be seen. She was lowkey about it.

Mindblowing, right? Wait, you can actually breastfeed in public and not have to show everyone what you're doing? What a revolutionary idea!

There is nothing wrong with feeding your baby. It's something you need to do, it's a part of life. But there is definitely something wrong with thinking it's fine to expose yourself to the entire world while doing it. Nobody wants to see it. Nobody cares if you're feeding your kid. Nobody cares if you're trying to make some sort of weird "feminist" statement by showing them your boobs.

Cover up. Be modest. Be mindful. Be respectful. Don't want to see my boobs? Good, I don't want to see yours either. Hard to believe, I know.

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My AP Environmental Science Class' Cookie Mining Experiment Shows Why Capitalism Is Destroying The Planet

Who cares about the environment with profits this high?

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With the AP exams in May approaching quickly, my AP Environmental Science class has wasted no time in jumping right into labs. To demonstrate the damage to the environment done by strip mining, we were instructed to remove the chocolate chips from cookies.

The experiment in itself was rather simple. We profited from fully or partially extracted chips ($8 for a full piece and $4 for a partial) and lost from buying tools, using time and area and incurring fines.

This might seem simplistic, but it showcased the nature of disastrous fossil fuel companies.

We were fined a $1 per minute we spent mining. It cost $4 per tool we bought (either tweezers or paper clips) and 50 cents for every square centimeter of cookie we mined.

Despite the seemingly overbearing charges compared to the sole way to profit, it was actually really easy to profit.

If we found even a partial chocolate chip per minute, that's $3 profit or utilization elsewhere. Tools were an investment that could be made up each with a partial chip, and clearly we were able to find much, much more than just one partial chip per tool.

Perhaps the most disproportionally easiest thing to get around were the fines. We were liable to be fined for habitat destruction, dangerous mining conditions with faulty tools, clutter, mess and noise level. No one in the class got fined for noise level nor faulty tools, but we got hit with habitat destruction and clutter, both of which added up to a mere $6.

We managed to avoid higher fines by deceiving our teacher by pushing together the broken cookie landscapes and swiping away the majority of our mess before being examined for fining purposes. This was amidst all of our cookies being broken into at least three portions.

After finding many, many chips, despite the costs of mining, we profited over $100. We earned a Franklin for destroying our sugary environment.

We weren't even the worst group.

It was kind of funny the situations other groups simulated to their cookies. We were meant to represent strip mining, but one group decided to represent mountaintop removal. Mountaintop removal is where companies go to extract resources from the tops of mountains via explosions to literally blow the tops off. This group did this by literally pulverizing their cookies to bits and pieces with their fists.

They incurred the maximum fine of $45. They didn't profit $100, however.

They profited over $500 dollars.

In the context of our environmental science class, these situations were anywhere from funny to satisfying. In the context of the real world, however, the consequences are devastating our environment.

Without even mentioning the current trajectory we're on approaching a near irreversible global temperature increase even if we took drastic measures this moment, mining and fracking is literally destroying ecosystems.



We think of earthquakes as creating mass amounts of sudden movement and unholy deep trenches as they fracture our crust. With dangerous mining habits, we do this ourselves.

Bigger companies not even related to mining end up destroying the planet and even hundreds of thousands of lives. ExxonMobil, BP? Still thriving in business after serial oil spills over the course of their operation. Purdue Pharma, the company who has misled the medical community for decades about the effects of OxyContin and its potential for abuse, is still running and ruining multitudes more lives every single day.

Did these companies receive fines? Yes.

But their business model is too profitable to make the fines have just about any effect upon their operation.

In our cookie mining simulation, we found that completely obliterating the landscape was much more profitable than being careful and walking on eggshells around the laws. Large, too-big-to-fail companies have held the future of our planet in their greedy paws and have likewise pulverized our environment, soon enough to be unable to return from.

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