It's Time For Boise State To Part Ways With Scott Yenor

It's Time For Boise State To Part Ways With Scott Yenor

Boise State Is Better Than Transphobia & Homophobia
5562
views

The events unfolding in Virginia as I sat down to write this are a clear indicator of one fact: The status quo is not politically neutral. There is no such thing as political neutrality.

As the gap widens between Americans political opinions (that is, the Alt-right/ White supremacy vs. Leftism/Antifa), these issues are only likely to become more divisive. Donald Trump campaigned partially on the notion of reuniting the country.

This was easy for him to do because many folks scapegoated Obama for a growing divide when in reality ever-increasing polarity is the underlying cause. The moderate solution to this question is now—and has been—to simply try to resolve differences. The simple fact of the matter, though, is that some political questions are not negotiable, and we need to stop pretending that they are.

This means, then, that there are some issues where a "politically neutral" stance is in fact siding with the oppressor. Homophobia and transphobia are two of those issues.

This brings us to my hometown. Boise is a blue dot in the red sea that is Idaho. While Boise is not a political safe haven by any means, the city does some things right. Boise has established and maintained refugee centers, has heavy emphasis on music and arts, and boasts the most diversity in the state of Idaho.

Boise State University, however, seems slow to respond to Boise's political climate. If Boise State wants to demonstrate an ounce of political responsibility and respect for their students, this is an important chance.

Meet Scott Yenor. Yenor is a professor at Boise State who specializes in family politics, but at the university he teaches political philosophy and constitutional law. Although there are a plethora of mind-numbingly negative experiences that people who have taken classes from Yenor can recount, I won't be able to speak of that here due to slander law.

Furthermore, I'd rather leave these questions up to university investigation as opposed to hearsay. As is, there are a multitude of morally reprehensible notions in Yenor's writing which constitute a dangerous ideology that warrants separation from the university. Let's focus on that.

The primary piece I'd like to call attention to is one he published just 10 days ago titled "Transgender Activists Are Seeking to Undermine Parental Rights." Although the bulk of the content is repulsive, I will emphasize just a few passages.

This is a blatantly inappropriate statement and frankly the root of much homophobia. Yenor is obsessed with the idea of procreation within heterosexual marriage (which, by the way is possible for queer folk). As if it is not bad enough that this man is quite literally endorsing the obsolete, archaic notion of sex roles, he has just informed the public that he believes one type of relationship to be inferior to the others. Let's be clear: that belief is one which is frequently used to justify exclusion of queer folk and depict them as a threat to society. It should come as no surprise that this appears immediately underneath the passage.


Yenor does not believe that queer folk are as fit to raise children. Pardon me, Scott, I forgot that straight couples are doing so well. Yenor frequently fails to evaluate his arguments in context of the whole status quo, though.

As if somehow children in the US never make life-altering decisions before the age of consent against their parents' wishes...

But Yenor's utopian view of heterosexual families raising kids is evident throughout the entire piece. Yenor repeatedly defers to parental rights and parental choice as if parents are all knowing-Gods who could restore society if only the left would just let them be!

This is deplorable when we live in the state of Idaho, where it is still legal to disregard children's urgent medical needs in the name of "faith." In fact, so-called "faith healing" cases are responsible for multiple children's deaths every year in Idaho. But no, the degradation of sex roles is what's destroying the integrity of the family unit and our society.

Yenor also frequently discounts the importance of gender. Throughout his entire article, he puts the words gender identity in quotations. Couple this with his arguments about sex roles and Yenor's message is clear: There are only two genders each of which has a certain set of behaviors which ought to be followed in order to promote societal good.

Deviation from this truth must be excluded, punished, and under no circumstances promoted.

Trans folk have some of the highest suicide rates amongst any demographic in the world. Ideology like Yenor's promotes the anxiety that non-cis people feel about their gender. His work also sends the signal to trans folk that they ought to feel excluded. The rate at which trans folk are killed, also unparalleled, is fueled by people who believe that deviation from one's biological sex and "heterosexual desire" is to be punished.

These statements cannot be excused. Make no mistake, the people who are running counter protests over in Virgina, the alt-right, and white supremacist groups share one idea: They truly believe they are fighting for their way of life.

They actually live in fear of white genocide.

Yenor's propaganda is precisely the foundation for these actions. At the end of the day, it asks individuals not to accept certain lifestyles because they "pose a threat" to the way of life they deem best.

Google was willing to take this step because they recognize that political neutrality is not always an option. The university is one of the primary sites for shaping the political world. If we even remotely share in Yenor's concern for future generations, then it's time for Boise state to step up.


P.S. Don't bother approaching this article with the "This is equally intolerant" BS.

There is a difference between being intolerant of an exclusionary viewpoint someone holds and being intolerant of a person because of an immutable characteristic. Yenor doesn't have to be an asshole. Queer/Trans folk don't have a choice.


Please take a moment to sign and rally against homophobia and transphobia in academia.

Cover Image Credit: Petra Construction

Popular Right Now

'Baby, It's Cold Outside' Is NOT About Date Rape, It's A Fight Against Social Norms Of The 1940s

The popular Christmas song shouldn't be considered inappropriate.

47818
views

The classic Christmas song "Baby, It's Cold Outside" has recently come under attack. There has been controversy over the song being deemed as inappropriate since it has been suggested that it promotes date rape. Others believe that the song is another common example of our culture's promotion of rape. You may be wondering, where did they get that idea from?

The controversy has led to one radio station, WDOK, taking the song off the air and banning it from their station. Some people believe that this song goes against the #MeToo movement since it promotes rape. However, people are not considering the fact that this traditional Christmas song was made in the 1940s.

People are viewing the song from a modern-day cultural perspective rather than from the perspective of the 1940s. "Baby, It's Cold Outside" was written in 1944. Many people have viewed the song from the perspective of our cultural and social norms. People believe that the song promotes date rape because of lyrics that suggest that the male singing is trying to stop the female singer from leaving, and the female singer is constantly singing about trying to escape with verses like "I really can't stay" or "I've got to go home."

When you first view the song from the perspective of today's culture, you may jump to the conclusion that the song is part of the date rape culture. And it's very easy to jump to this conclusion, especially when you are viewing only one line from the song. We're used to women being given more freedom. In our society, women can have jobs, marry and be independent. However, what everyone seems to forget is that women did not always have this freedom.

In 1944, one of the social norms was that women had curfews and were not allowed to be in the same house as a man at a later time. It was considered a scandal if a single woman so much as stayed at another man's house, let alone be in the same room together. It's mind-blowing, right? You can imagine that this song was probably considered very provocative for the time period.

"Baby, It's Cold Outside" is not a song that encourages date rape, but is actually challenging the social norms of society during the time period. When you listen to the song, you notice that at one part of the song, the female states, "At least I can say that I tried," which suggests that she really doesn't want to leave. In fact, most of the song, she is going back and forth the whole time about leaving stating, "I ought to say no…well maybe just a half a drink more," and other phrases.

She doesn't want to leave but doesn't really have a choice due to fear of causing a scandal, which would have consequences with how others will treat her. It was not like today's society where nobody cares how late someone stays at another man's house. Nowadays, we could care less if we heard that our single neighbor stayed over a single man's house after 7. We especially don't try to look through our curtain to check on our neighbor. Well, maybe some of us do. But back then, people did care about where women were and what they were doing.

The female singer also says in the lyrics, "The neighbors might think," and, "There's bound to be talk tomorrow," meaning she's scared of how others might perceive her for staying with him. She even says, "My sister will be suspicious," and, "My brother will be there at the door," again stating that she's worried that her family will find out and she will face repercussions for her actions. Yes, she is a grown woman, but that doesn't mean that she won't be treated negatively by others for going against the social norms of the time period.

Then why did the male singer keep pressuring her in the song? This is again because the song is more about challenging the social norms of the time period. Both the female and male singers in the song are trying to find excuses to stay and not leave.

On top of that, when you watch the video of the scene in which the song was originally viewed, you notice that the genders suddenly switch for another two characters, and now it's a female singer singing the male singer's part and vice versa. You also notice that the whole time, both characters are attracted to one another and trying to find a way to stay over longer.

Yes, I know you're thinking it doesn't matter about the genders. But, the song is again consensual for both couples. The woman, in the beginning, wants to stay but knows what will await if she doesn't leave. The male singer meanwhile is trying to convince her to forget about the rules for the time period and break them.

In addition, the complaint regarding the lyric "What's in this drink?" is misguided. What a lot of people don't understand is that back in 1944, this was a common saying. If you look at the lyrics of the song, you notice that the woman who is singing is trying to blame the alcoholic drink for causing her to want to stay longer instead of leaving early. It has nothing to do with her supposed fear that he may have tried to give her too much to drink in order to date rape her. Rather, she is trying to find something to blame for her wanting to commit a scandal.

As you can see, when you view the song from the cultural perspective of the 1940s, you realize that the song could be said to fight against the social norms of that decade. It is a song that challenges the social constrictions against women during the time period. You could even say that it's an example of women's rights, if you wanted to really start an argument.

Yes, I will admit that there were movies and songs made back in the time period that were part of the culture of date rape. However, this song is not the case. It has a historical context that cannot be viewed from today's perspective.

The #MeToo movement is an important movement that has led to so many changes in our society today. However, this is not the right song to use as an example of the date rape culture.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

How Much Alcohol You Drink A Week, Based on Your GPA

You spend your life studying, so you might as well drink to forget.

1748
views

We all know that balancing work and play is a priority to college students.

You want to succeed and get good grades, but you also want to have a good time while you're still in college. Some struggle with balance. They over booze-cruise and some over-dedicate themselves to their work that they never get their dose of Vitamin D.

But, one thing that everyone can say, is that almost everyone drinks in college. And, the amount that you drink can definitely make or break your grades.

3.5 or higher

You educations means a lot to you, but you still know how to have fun every once in a while. The weekends are your time to shine, but the party doesn't start until your homework is done.

3.0-3.4

A little overwhelmed with your school work, you relax by doing you work with wine or doing half of your work then heading to the bar for their specials. You're a few times week regular, but you never go super crazy. You definitely care about your work and definitely need to get it done, but you're not afraid to pick up the bottle and get wild every now and again.

2.0-2.9

You try hard to get your work done but the fear of missing out has you buggin' hard. So, you try to get your work done before you go out, but you might forget a few things. Remember to pace yourself, and you're spending money to go to school for a reason! You may be at the club 5/7 days of the week, but you'll still turn in some of your work.

1.9 or lower

In constant stress-mode, you de-stress by going out with your friends and getting to parties. It's probably an every-day affair. But, you may let your grades slip a little more than you should, so you spend the next several weeks trying to scramble up the GPA scale. Sometimes it works out for the better, but other times, you end up falling close or below the red. Remember, prioritize your future. You have your whole life ahead of you to party and booze.

Everyone has their vices on how to cope with work and stress, but know that you should partake in those vices in moderation. There is plenty of time to get messed up and make some memories, just do it after you finish your schoolwork. What do you think breaks are for?

Also, PLEASE don't do hard drugs!!!

Happy drinking...I mean, studying!

Related Content

Facebook Comments