Why A 70s Teen Magazine Will Make You Glad That Era Has Passed
Start writing a post
Entertainment

Why A 70s Teen Magazine Will Make You Glad That Era Has Passed

Star magazine detailed the lives and exploits of teenage groupies on the Sunset Strip.

7469
Why A 70s Teen Magazine Will Make You Glad That Era Has Passed
honeyhivintage.blogspot.com

I am ever-so-slightly, kinda, sorta, very obsessed with the rock culture of the 1960s and 70s. And while I adore Mick and Keith and Lou and David, it's the women they loved, and who loved them, who inspire me the most. There are few things I find more enjoyable than a great rock chick memoir. "I'm With the Band," written by legendary self-professed rock groupie Pamela Des Barres, is a book I could read over and over again — total fantasy fuel for anyone who ever imagined sneaking backstage at a Zeppelin concert during the band's heyday. Another perennial favorite is Marianne Faithfull's autobiography, "Faithfull." The singer and style icon was Mick Jagger's long-time girlfriend and a muse to Bob Dylan. She performed with David Bowie. She also overcame a devastating heroin addiction which left her homeless and living on a wall in central London for a few years in the 70s. She's complicated, beautiful and resilient, and totally rock and roll.

Watching HBO's " Vinyl " reignited my interest in the wild music industry during the 70s. The other day I spent hours stuck in a glitter-tinged internet rabbit hole looking at pictures of Cyrinda Foxe and Bebe Buell when I stumbled across an archive of the short-lived 1973 teen magazine Star. The website was created by Ryan Richardson, who took it upon himself to upload every edition, a service that had this 70s-obsessed rock aficionado shouting "YAAAAAASSS" at my laptop.

Star is a relic from an era when rock stars enjoyed a mythic, untouchable status. In 1973, Robert Plant truly was the Golden God, bare-chested and crowned with luscious blond locks. David Bowie was a space creature who seemed to be passing through our planet momentarily. The magazine is a combination of idol worship and very un-PC advice for young women. Articles detail "Foxy Power Plays You Can Use On Him," and "Girls Who Fight Over Guys: Will You Be Ready?" One reader writes to the magazine, asking for advice about her 15-year-old sister Robyn, who is sneaking out at night and dating guys in their 20s. Star's response? "Why don't you quit "worrying" about Robyn, Big Sister, and get a few guys for yourself?" I'll just leave that one there for you to mull over.

In addition to horrendous 'advice' articles and celebrity interviews, Star documents a very different breed of rock chick — the underage groupie. The magazine was shut down after five issues following complaints from the concerned public. Heaven knows why anyone would have been upset about a magazine that covered the exploits of teenagers like Lori Maddox, who recently was at the center of a controversy over statutory rape and David Bowie.

Each issue of the magazine has a comic strip called "Groupies." It is devoted solely to the exploits of, well... groupies. It depicts nubile young women named Molly and Twink as they figure out how to sneak into Alice Cooper's mansion or a Beatle's recording session.

Shray Mecham was the first cover girl for Star. The magazine described the 15-year-old from San Francisco as "foxy," and covered Shray and her friends Sable Starr and Queenie Glam (presumably not their real names) in an article called "Sunset Strip Groupies: Who, What, When & How (Wow!)." The girls can't hide their youth, even under pounds of makeup, silver lame hot pants and 6-inch platforms. There are some pretty cringe-worthy quotes. Take, for instance, Queenie expounding on the importance of connections if you want to meet your favorite rock star: "Even if the guy is 120 years old you have to be kissie with him 'cause he might make good connections for you." Yikes.

The girls seem like a fiercely competitive crew, who do not hesitate to call other women ugly, and claim that they are not worried about other more established groupies like Pamela Des Barres. The reason? Women in their late twenties and early thirties are "too old" and not worth any attention.

Lori Maddox has since claimed that she never felt exploited, and I believe it. And while I'm a sucker for platforms and garter belts and everything lamé, it seems that all the glitter was masking something sinister. The culture that Star briefly covered was ruthless, a culture where women (or girls) tore each other down. I think I'll stick to my free-thinking, free-loving legal rock chicks, thank you very much.

Report this Content
This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
houses under green sky
Photo by Alev Takil on Unsplash

Small towns certainly have their pros and cons. Many people who grow up in small towns find themselves counting the days until they get to escape their roots and plant new ones in bigger, "better" places. And that's fine. I'd be lying if I said I hadn't thought those same thoughts before too. We all have, but they say it's important to remember where you came from. When I think about where I come from, I can't help having an overwhelming feeling of gratitude for my roots. Being from a small town has taught me so many important lessons that I will carry with me for the rest of my life.

Keep Reading...Show less
​a woman sitting at a table having a coffee
nappy.co

I can't say "thank you" enough to express how grateful I am for you coming into my life. You have made such a huge impact on my life. I would not be the person I am today without you and I know that you will keep inspiring me to become an even better version of myself.

Keep Reading...Show less
Student Life

Waitlisted for a College Class? Here's What to Do!

Dealing with the inevitable realities of college life.

89004
college students waiting in a long line in the hallway
StableDiffusion

Course registration at college can be a big hassle and is almost never talked about. Classes you want to take fill up before you get a chance to register. You might change your mind about a class you want to take and must struggle to find another class to fit in the same time period. You also have to make sure no classes clash by time. Like I said, it's a big hassle.

This semester, I was waitlisted for two classes. Most people in this situation, especially first years, freak out because they don't know what to do. Here is what you should do when this happens.

Keep Reading...Show less
a man and a woman sitting on the beach in front of the sunset

Whether you met your new love interest online, through mutual friends, or another way entirely, you'll definitely want to know what you're getting into. I mean, really, what's the point in entering a relationship with someone if you don't know whether or not you're compatible on a very basic level?

Consider these 21 questions to ask in the talking stage when getting to know that new guy or girl you just started talking to:

Keep Reading...Show less
Lifestyle

Challah vs. Easter Bread: A Delicious Dilemma

Is there really such a difference in Challah bread or Easter Bread?

58456
loaves of challah and easter bread stacked up aside each other, an abundance of food in baskets
StableDiffusion

Ever since I could remember, it was a treat to receive Easter Bread made by my grandmother. We would only have it once a year and the wait was excruciating. Now that my grandmother has gotten older, she has stopped baking a lot of her recipes that require a lot of hand usage--her traditional Italian baking means no machines. So for the past few years, I have missed enjoying my Easter Bread.

Keep Reading...Show less

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Facebook Comments