14 Tweets Roasting IHOP For Changing Its Name

14 Tweets Roasting IHOP For Changing Its Name

Bancakes, pacon, and purgers, oh my!

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Okay, so I'm sure everybody has heard about IHOP changing its name. When I first saw the reveal of IHOb, I figured the b would stand for breakfast. Boy was I wrong. The b stands for burgers. You heard it. Burgers.

They are introducing a new line of burgers in the restaurant but why change the name. I'm not gonna go to IHOP for a burger. That's what Five Guys or Red Robin is for. They claim the change is temporary but we shall see.

1. Hot Pockets

2. White Castle

3. Hot Pockets again

4. MoonPie

5. Pop-Tarts

6. Timehop

7. A&W

8. Phila

9. Netflix

10. The queen of shade, Wendy's

11. The shade king, Burger King

12. Pancake King channeling their inner Taylor Swift

13. Whataburger

14. Wendy's round 2

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23 Snacks You Live On And Don’t Understand How Vegans Live WITHOUT

What do they eat, rocks?

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Vegans actively avoid the use of animal products for food, clothing or any other purpose. So, what do they snack on? I'm sure there are plenty of tasty options, but there are some caveats, too.

As for me, I'm not a vegan, LOVE the following snacks and don't see how vegans can live without them.

1. Vanilla ice cream

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Even if you eat dairy-free ice cream, it doesn't make it necessarily vegan. Castoreum from beavers can be used for vanilla flavoring.

Also, don't @ me for liking vanilla ice cream — you can add literally anything to it and change the flavor.

2. Flavored potato chips

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It depends on the flavor, but some chips contain dairy products — even if the flavor has nothing to do with dairy.

Why are they called potato chips? Because you can't stop at just one.

3. Non-organic bananas

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If you're eating non-organic bananas, you could be eating a spray-on coating made with shrimp and crab shells that lengthens shelf life.

I'd go bananas without bananas.

4. Bagels

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L-Cysteine is a dough conditioner and strengthener often made from bird feathers.

Giving up bagels, though? That's for the birds.

5. Red candies

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Vegans probably already know this, but "Natural Red #4" is made from cochineal — AKA smashed bugs.

The only thing that bugs me about red candies is my tongue being stained.

6. Hard-coated candies

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Most hard-coated candies are coated with shellac. First off, it's the same shellac for nails, furniture polish and hairspray — yum. But for vegans, shellac is made from insect secretions.

Call me hard headed, but I'm not giving up candy.

7. Salted peanuts

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Seems innocent, right? Not always for vegans. Guess what's keeping the salt on those peanuts — gelatin. And gelatin is typically made from the skin, tendons, ligaments and/or bones of cattle and swine.

You're nuts if you think I'll stop eating peanuts.

8. Twinkies

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We know they're not healthy, but they're not vegan either. Tallow, made from beef fat, is what keeps Twinkies on shelves forever. And their sweet taste is what makes us non-vegans love them forever.

9. Chex Mix

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Most Chex Mix recipes call for Worcestershire sauce — made with anchovies. The mixed nuts probably have gelatin in them, too.

Your thinking is mixed up if you think I'll give up Chex Mix.

10. Lucky Charms

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Gelatin strikes again with the marshmallows being vegan-unfriendly. For the rest of us, "They're magically delicious!"

11. Pastries

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Suet is the fat around the kidneys and organs in animals — a saturated fat commonly used in pastries. You'll probably find bird feather-related ingredients in them, too.

If it hasn't saturated into your brain yet, I'm not giving up my snacks.

12. Jell-O

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More gelatin. Vegans are missing out on more than the tasty snacks from gelatin, they're missing out on health benefits, too.

Give up a fun and tasty snack? Jell-No.

13. Beef, turkey and other jerkies

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This one is obvious why vegans won't touch it, but they're missing out on the awesome taste of a convenient and versatile snack.

I'm not trying to be a jerk, but don't touch my jerky.

14. Pizza

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Remember that dough strengthener? Yeah, it's probably in pizza, too.

What kind of person gives up pizza? A weir-dough!

15. Fries

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Fries are, obviously, fried. That means oil, which means fat — like McDonald's using beef fat for their fries.

Your brain is fried if you think I'm giving up fries.

16. Pop Tarts

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If you eat Pop Tarts without frosting — the ones that don't taste as good — you might be safe. But the frosting in Pop Tarts contains gelatin.

Bless your tart if you think I'm giving up Pop Tarts (I'm not).

17. Salted sunflower seeds

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If salted peanuts use gelatin to make the salt stick, you better believe some brands do the same for sunflower seeds.

Good luck stopping this Kansan from eating them.

18. Cheese

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This one is so obvious why vegans won't eat it, it's cheesy.

A friend from Japan said that one of the first things she noticed about Americans is that we LOVE cheese.

19. Peanut butter

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The FDA allows a ratio of 30 insect fragments per 100 grams of peanut butter. Bad for vegans, but insects offer a host of health benefits.

You butter believe I'm not giving up peanut butter.

20. Fruit snacks

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Gelatin, again. It won't stop me from smiling as I eat my fruit smiles, though.

21. Apples

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Apples are often coated with beeswax, shellac, carnauba and/or petroleum jelly.

An apple a day keeps the doctor away, and a bit of wax (that can be washed off) isn't going to keep me away from apples.

22. Dried fruit

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While all fruit contains natural sugar, dried fruit often has added sugar. But that's not a problem, It's just sugar… right? You might want to check out the next point...

23. Basically anything with sugar

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Sorry, sugar, but bone char gives some sugars its pure white color.

It tickles my funny bone if you think I'll stop eating sugary snacks.

I understand that some individuals cannot eat certain animal by-products due to health reasons. Also, I'm not judging anyone for their lifestyle choices — I just don't see how I could live without my snacks!

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10 Phrases Only Restaurant Workers Say, And What They Mean

Here are some terms I've learned in the kitchen after serving for a year and a half.

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When I was in high school, I used to say that I could never work in a restaurant. I didn't think I had it in me.

But a friend got me a job as a hostess at a restaurant, and within a month the manager asked me to train to serve. Honestly believing that I couldn't do the job, I said yes and took on the challenge. I had a great server train me and within days I had gotten into the swing of things.

Now I've been serving for a year and a half, and if I've learned anything, it's the restaurant culture is unlike any other. Here are some terms I've learned in the kitchen.

1. "I'm weeded"

The interesting thing about this one is I only heard it once I moved to the South. I don't know if it was just the specific restaurant I worked at, but I didn't hear it in the North. I was very confused at first, but now it is one of my favorite terms.

Example: "I have seven tables. I'm weeded/in the weeds."

2. "Double-sat"

Servers are supposed to be "sat" one table at a time until the host has given one table to every server, then they start over and give everyone a second table, and so on. But things happen, sometimes people ask to sit in your section and all of a sudden you're double-sat. This also applies to triple-sat, quadruple-sat and so on.

Example: "The hostess double-sat me, and now I'm weeded."

3. "Heard"

This is one that I often accidentally apply to life outside the kitchen. When someone says something to you, us restaurant people acknowledge by saying "heard," sometimes including "heard that" or "heard" followed by repeating exactly what they said.

Example: someone says, "You got table 36." You say "Heard, table 36." This makes communication in an often hectic environment clearer.

4. "86"

86 simply means we are out of that item.

Example: "86 green beans" to which you would respond, "heard, 86 green beans." You get the idea.

5. "Behind/beside you!"

This is a great announcement to make particularly if you or someone else is carrying a tray of food. By shouting that you are "behind you" or "beside you," this more or less prevents getting bumped into and food getting spilled or anyone getting hurt. This is another phrase I carry over into everyday life, which I really shouldn't do.

Example: "Behind you!" "Heard!"

6. "Cut"

When you are cut that means you are not getting any more tables for the night. So, that means finish up the tables you do have, clean your section, complete your side work, print your checkout and go home! When you're having a particularly rough night, the best thing anyone can say to you is:

Example: "Hey, you're cut," to which you would likely to respond, either "heard, cut" or, more likely, "woohoo!"

7. "Side work"

Side work is all that annoying stuff you have to do besides actually waiting tables. This may be stocking the POS (Point of Sales) stations where the computer and receipt printers are, or it may be putting dishes away. It usually involves some sort of cleaning or stocking supplies, and you have to get signed off for completing it before you get to go home.

Example: "My side work tonight is to stock the drink stations." Ugh.

8. "Down"

When something is "down" that means one of two things. Either, we are running low on some supply and someone needs to get some more or a food is being cooked.

Example: "Down biscuits!" means someone better put some more biscuits in the oven stat.

"You got fries down?" is asking whether the fry cook has french fries in the fryer.

9. "Double"

To be a double means to work the lunch and dinner shift in one day, as opposed to just one of them. If you are a double you are supposed to get special treatment, which may or may not involve getting cut early in the dinner shift.

Example: "I am a double every Saturday."

10. "Closer"

At some restaurants, this may be called a "Team Leader," but at my current restaurant, it is called a closer. They are the person responsible for signing your checkout slip, which tells the manager you cleaned your section and completed your side work. A dinner closer is also responsible for shutting down the service stations at the end of the night.

Example: "Who is the closer tonight?"

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