The Artistic Destruction of Hope
Start writing a post
Entertainment

The Artistic Destruction of Hope

Parallelisms between A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

11
The Artistic Destruction of Hope
https://unsplash.com/photos/0FRJ2SCuY4k

The endings of both A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen and The Awakening by Kate Chopin convey a new beginning for their protagonists through the destruction of hope in their relationships.

The characters are on missions for their own happiness, which is a controversial mindset for women to have during the times that the books were written (the late 1800s). The women are expected to be inferior to their husbands and abide to their needs. Edna shows a more drastic transition than Nora in which she develops and matures as an independent woman, allowing her to choose herself over her husband. In the beginning of The Awakening, Edna is pictured as being submissive. She is concerned for her husband and does what is expected of her, such as offering to oversee dinner-- "'Coming back to dinner?' his wife called after him" (Chopin 3). At the end of the novel, however, she is independent and makes her own decision to move out of her house. Chopin writes, "Without even waiting for an answer from her husband regarding his opinion or wishes in the matter, Edna hastened her preparations for quitting her home on Esplanade Street and moving into the little house around the block" (Chopin 93). An evident change in Edna is present, as the desires of her husband are no longer her top priority. Her newfound confidence and ability to put her own wishes first are the primary changes that occur for Edna and adumbrate her tragically beautiful demise. Edna goes to the beach to commit suicide. Thus, the same place that she once ventured to to find serenity, she now goes to for eternal peace, conveying her depression. She does not view death as a negativity, as she has accepted that she cannot have a relationship with Robert. The destruction of hope in her relationship leads her to everlasting peacefulness and a new beginning.

In A Doll House, Nora's history is explored, establishing her has a previously rebellious character through her scandal. However, her husband is not aware of her actions. When Nora becomes aware that he may find out, she appears nervous and afraid of him, doing everything in her power to keep him away from the mailbox. Nora expresses, "Nothing can save us now. The letter is in the mailbox" (Ibsen 1128). Nora's despair causes her to appear subordinate, but her decision to leave her husband at the end conveys her power as an independent person-- parallel to Edna. At the end of the play, Nora is demanding and aware of what she wants-- which is to no longer be held back by her husband. Nora orders, "Here is your ring back. Now give me mine" (Ibsen 1150). By running away from her husband, she sets herself free from his obsession with reputation and is able to live her life as she pleases.

The inconclusive endings of both works exemplify the new realities that both women will be experiencing (a new, free life for Nora and a disenthralled life after death for Edna)-- realities of uncertainty and freedom. They are no longer restricted by their husbands, and their independent decisions are the result of the strength they have acquired after being unhappy for so long. The women epitomize self-determination through the endings of their stories, and their rebellion against society's standards emanate their confidence during a time of personal fragility.

Report this Content
This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
Featured

To The Boy Who Changed Me

Just another open letter from a crazy ex-girlfriend.

1889
http://cdn1.theodysseyonline.com/files/2015/10/09/635800144722553570-908383045_993037_10201471592537019_550485816_n.jpg

You’re probably thinking, “oh sh*t, my ex is writing a hate letter and a tell-all about our roller coaster tycoon relationship with terrible fallout.” But if you’re thinking that, oh honey you’re wrong. This isn’t some sappy pity party nonsense and it’s not a trash-my-ex tell all; it’s a journey. And it’s my side of our story to tell…

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Dear College Students, Are You Undecided?

The Girlfriend's Guide to College

4872
Dear College Students, Are You Undecided?
https://pixabay.com/photos/college-students-diploma-graduate-3990783/

Up until last week, I always had a major. I was an international business major, finance major, psych major on the pre-medicine track… and now (finally) I am exactly where I should have been when I started college: undecided. I think there is too much pressure as a high school student to have a designated path about what you want to study, be when you 'grow up' and essentially spend the rest of your life doing. As an 18-year-old, I really feel like I tried to pin myself down to a major so that I had a set path to follow and something to look towards. This is probably very conventional and I know tons of people at school who have their minds made up about what they want to study.

Keep Reading... Show less
Adulting

Life Is Messy

Finding who you are in your 20s

4515
Life Is Messy
https://www.pexels.com/photo/shallow-focus-photography-of-yellow-sunflower-field-under-sunny-sky-1169084/

I am 25 years old and just now learning who I am. When I separated from my husband I was terrified of what would follow. I did not know who I was outside of a relationship, nor did I know how to be on my own. It was scary, and I was so lost. I spent months discovering who I was, and what I wanted to be. I am still searching as I believe we never truly know who we are even when we "grow up". I came to the realization that I had been hiding a part of myself for my entire life. Coming out was not easy, growing up in the church made it scary, and hard. I was told growing up that being anything but straight was such a sin, and that i would spent my life in hell because of it. I came out to my parents when I was 25 years old. I picked up the phone and called my mom, and uttered the words "I'm queer" through tears. I knew my parents would be supportive, but that didn't make it any easier for me to vulnerable and raw. Since then, I have slowly started being more authentic in who I am, and not hide parts of me just because of people's shitty opinions.

Keep Reading... Show less
Adulting

Ask Your BFF These 20 Questions To See If They Know You As Well As You THINK That They Do

Ask your best friend these basic questions to see just how well they know you.

42388
Ask Your BFF These 20 Questions To See If They Know You As Well As You THINK That They Do

My best friend has been in my life since we were 3 years old, now that we are adults now, I'd like to ask her these questions to see how well she knows me.

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Alone At The Met

I survive a day alone in NYC.

11746
Wikimedia Commons

It was six in the evening. I was sitting in the courtyard of a Renaissance-era Italian villa, glancing around at the statues, most notably one of a boy removing a thorn from his foot. Despite the supposedly relaxing setting, I was incredibly anxious. My phone was at less than 5 percent battery, and once it died I would be completely disconnected from my family and peers, alone in one of the largest art museums in the country.

Keep Reading... Show less

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Facebook Comments