Historically, women's history has not been discussed. As late as the 1970s... much of women's history was not part of the curriculum in k12 schools. Here at Ball State, WGS 210 was not offered until the spring of 1972.

Women's and Gender Studies did not become an option as a minor until later in December of 1980. It was not until 2005 that the first student with a Women's and Gender Studies major graduated.

This means that, since Indiana gained statehood in 1816, less than half of that time involved college courses that taught students about feminism and important female historical figures. Even less of that time involved information taught in k12 schools.

This is why National Women's History month is important, it brings to light the parts of history that have been erased by women's oppression.

It is only recently that women's history has even been recognized. Where would we be without the revolutionary work of women like Nellie Bly or the bravery of Marsha P. Johnson? Women have revolutionized and created all throughout history and they should not be ignored.

"Here's to strong women. May we know them. May we be them. May we raise them." -Unknown