Every Queer Woman's Reactions To Hayley Kiyoko's New Album, As Told By Hayley Kiyoko Herself

Every Queer Woman's Reactions To Hayley Kiyoko's New Album, As Told By Hayley Kiyoko Herself

She's putting all the gay feels into words AND putting them to music!
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Hayley Kiyoko, AKA Lesbian Jesus, has finally blessed fans with her highly-anticipated debut album "Expectations." Kiyoko, unapologetically open about her sexuality, has become an LGBTQ icon in recent years, and her album is a glorious and refreshing celebration of same-sex love. Follow along on the emotional journey queer women everywhere felt when listening to "Expectations" song by song, as told by Lesbian Jesus herself.

1. "Expectations (Overture)"

OH MY GOD. IT'S STARTING. OK. IT'S HAPPENING. IT'S HAPPENING, EVERYONE.

2. "Feelings"

SHE'S PUTTING ALL THE GAY FEELS INTO WORDS *AND* PUTTING THEM TO MUSIC, DO Y'ALL HEAR THAT?

3. "What I Need (feat. Kehlani)"

I am SNATCHED, what a hecking BANGER! Gonna need more collabs with these two please.

4. "Sleepover"

Me? Attacked? By the Gay Origin Story™ being put to a majestic melody for both pleasure and profound introspection? Yes, I am.

5. "Mercy / Gatekeeper"

Oh, OK, nope she's not playing, we're gonna face these feels, alright, that's how we're doing this. Bring on the gay angst.

6. "Under The Blue / Take Me In"

Is this not gay "Little Mermaid" fanfic?

7. "Curious"

DIDYOUTAKEHIMTOTHEPIERINSANTAMONICAFORGETTOBRINGAJACKETWRAPUPINHIMCAUSEYOUWANTEDTO?

8. "xx"

These! Beats! Tho!

9. "Wanna Be Missed"

If this doesn't make you want to immediately smother your girlfriend in kisses and tell her how much you love her IDK what will.

10. "He'll Never Love You (HNLY)"

WIG! SHE SNAPPED! YAS QUEEN! SPILL THAT TEA! YOU'RE DOING AMAZING SWEETIE!

11. "Palm Dreams"

"I won't hang around until you want me" tell 'em, sis, you leave her sorry ass.

12. "Molecules"

It's OK, this is fine, I'm not crying...wait, no, yes I am.

13. "Let It Be"

Can we just talk for the next seven years about how cathartic and healing of a song this album ends with? Girl just summed up the entire rollercoaster of The Gay Experience™ in one album, Hayley Kiyoko really *did that.*

Cover Image Credit: Hayley Kiyoko / Instagram

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'Baby, It's Cold Outside' Is NOT About Date Rape, It's A Fight Against Social Norms Of The 1940s

The popular Christmas song shouldn't be considered inappropriate.

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The classic Christmas song "Baby, It's Cold Outside" has recently come under attack. There has been controversy over the song being deemed as inappropriate since it has been suggested that it promotes date rape. Others believe that the song is another common example of our culture's promotion of rape. You may be wondering, where did they get that idea from?

The controversy has led to one radio station, WDOK, taking the song off the air and banning it from their station. Some people believe that this song goes against the #MeToo movement since it promotes rape. However, people are not considering the fact that this traditional Christmas song was made in the 1940s.

People are viewing the song from a modern-day cultural perspective rather than from the perspective of the 1940s. "Baby, It's Cold Outside" was written in 1944. Many people have viewed the song from the perspective of our cultural and social norms. People believe that the song promotes date rape because of lyrics that suggest that the male singing is trying to stop the female singer from leaving, and the female singer is constantly singing about trying to escape with verses like "I really can't stay" or "I've got to go home."

When you first view the song from the perspective of today's culture, you may jump to the conclusion that the song is part of the date rape culture. And it's very easy to jump to this conclusion, especially when you are viewing only one line from the song. We're used to women being given more freedom. In our society, women can have jobs, marry and be independent. However, what everyone seems to forget is that women did not always have this freedom.

In 1944, one of the social norms was that women had curfews and were not allowed to be in the same house as a man at a later time. It was considered a scandal if a single woman so much as stayed at another man's house, let alone be in the same room together. It's mind-blowing, right? You can imagine that this song was probably considered very provocative for the time period.

"Baby, It's Cold Outside" is not a song that encourages date rape, but is actually challenging the social norms of society during the time period. When you listen to the song, you notice that at one part of the song, the female states, "At least I can say that I tried," which suggests that she really doesn't want to leave. In fact, most of the song, she is going back and forth the whole time about leaving stating, "I ought to say no…well maybe just a half a drink more," and other phrases.

She doesn't want to leave but doesn't really have a choice due to fear of causing a scandal, which would have consequences with how others will treat her. It was not like today's society where nobody cares how late someone stays at another man's house. Nowadays, we could care less if we heard that our single neighbor stayed over a single man's house after 7. We especially don't try to look through our curtain to check on our neighbor. Well, maybe some of us do. But back then, people did care about where women were and what they were doing.

The female singer also says in the lyrics, "The neighbors might think," and, "There's bound to be talk tomorrow," meaning she's scared of how others might perceive her for staying with him. She even says, "My sister will be suspicious," and, "My brother will be there at the door," again stating that she's worried that her family will find out and she will face repercussions for her actions. Yes, she is a grown woman, but that doesn't mean that she won't be treated negatively by others for going against the social norms of the time period.

Then why did the male singer keep pressuring her in the song? This is again because the song is more about challenging the social norms of the time period. Both the female and male singers in the song are trying to find excuses to stay and not leave.

On top of that, when you watch the video of the scene in which the song was originally viewed, you notice that the genders suddenly switch for another two characters, and now it's a female singer singing the male singer's part and vice versa. You also notice that the whole time, both characters are attracted to one another and trying to find a way to stay over longer.

Yes, I know you're thinking it doesn't matter about the genders. But, the song is again consensual for both couples. The woman, in the beginning, wants to stay but knows what will await if she doesn't leave. The male singer meanwhile is trying to convince her to forget about the rules for the time period and break them.

In addition, the complaint regarding the lyric "What's in this drink?" is misguided. What a lot of people don't understand is that back in 1944, this was a common saying. If you look at the lyrics of the song, you notice that the woman who is singing is trying to blame the alcoholic drink for causing her to want to stay longer instead of leaving early. It has nothing to do with her supposed fear that he may have tried to give her too much to drink in order to date rape her. Rather, she is trying to find something to blame for her wanting to commit a scandal.

As you can see, when you view the song from the cultural perspective of the 1940s, you realize that the song could be said to fight against the social norms of that decade. It is a song that challenges the social constrictions against women during the time period. You could even say that it's an example of women's rights, if you wanted to really start an argument.

Yes, I will admit that there were movies and songs made back in the time period that were part of the culture of date rape. However, this song is not the case. It has a historical context that cannot be viewed from today's perspective.

The #MeToo movement is an important movement that has led to so many changes in our society today. However, this is not the right song to use as an example of the date rape culture.

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The Cullen Girls: Part 18

Follow the lives of Meredith, Amy, Olivia, Sarah, and Jane Cullen, as they navigate the unknown territories that come with building a family through adoption.

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"What are you two fighting about now?" Olivia is sitting at the kitchen table with Sarah, and Amy is the stove making something mouth watering.

"Nothing," Jane mumbles, rolling her eyes as she comes through the screen door. Pete comes in behind her, hands up in disbelief.

"Really, Jane? You're gonna call that nothing?"

"Really, Pete? After everything you've put me through?"

"What did I do?"

"I'm talking about Davey. All that shit with Davey."

"Oh god, we're back to this." Sarah groans.

"Shut up." Jane and Pete tell her before turning and glaring at each other.

"What happened?" Olivia asks.

"Jane hates my girlfriend," Pete tells her.

"Oh my god, no I don't!"

"Aww, you have a girlfriend, Pete? And Jane's jealous?" Olivia leans forward, her own personal reality show right in front of her.

"I'm not jealous!" Jane shouts.

"It's obvious you don't like her - "

"That doesn't make me jealous. And I don't recall ever saying I didn't like her."

"You called her an airhead." Pete holds her stare. "To her face."

Even Amy is listening now. "Jeez, Jane. That's mean, even for you."

"Shut upppp!" Jane screams now. "I did not call her an airhead. All I said was that her comment made her sound like one. God."

Pete's face looks like he smells something bad. "You never have anything nice to say to her."

"You never have anything nice to say to Davey."

"I at least keep it to myself."

Jane punches Pete's arm as hard as she can, and his lack of reaction only pisses her off more. "Asshole! Go see your stupid movie with that airhead without me. Have fun explaining all of it to her the whole time."

"I will!" Pete is out the door, letting it slam behind him without another look at Jane. Jane runs for the door before he can get too far, yelling after him, "At least I get to make out when I go to the movies!" Behind her, her sisters are howling with laughter, and she turns her glare on them.

"Does this fucking amuse you?"

"More than you know." Olivia manages to get out.

"Well I can understand why you're amused," Jane shoots back, but Olivia is too caught up to be insulted.

……….

The change in Sarah is pretty quick. Her relationship with Ryan goes from casual to serious in a short time, and the result is the opposite of what her family expected. The same ends up being true with Olivia. She goes in the opposite direction with every step Sarah takes forward with Ryan. Her family goes days without hearing from her, and when she does grace them with her presence, she's short with everyone and downright nasty towards Sarah. After several dinners end with one or the other storming out of the house, Olivia stops showing up at all.

Tonight, after several minutes of hearing nothing but silverware on plates, Meredith asks, "Has anyone talked to Olivia?"

Amy looks at her mother, hesitating. "I tried calling before I came over, but she didn't answer."

"I talked to her yesterday." Jane offers, looking to Amy. "She said she wasn't coming, but I didn't think she meant it." Only Jane catches Sarah rolling her eyes. They both jump when Meredith throws her silverware on her plate.

"That's it. We are not having family dinners when family is missing."

"Mom, she's missing it by choice," Sarah scoffs, clearly annoyed.

"Choice or not, this isn't how this family works." Meredith starts grabbing everyone's plates as Sarah starts to protest. Her mother holds with a look that still manages to work, and Sarah knows better than to say anything more. When they reach Olivia's apartment her car isn't in its spot, but whether Meredith sees this or not doesn't matter. They all follow her silently up the stairs.

"Jeez, Mom, at least knock first," Jane says when Meredith pulls out a key. The last thing they need is to walk in on Ollie with a guy. Jane knocks loudly twice before reluctantly stepping back beside Amy. She doesn't like what they're doing, unsettles by what's happening between Olivia and Sarah. Amy puts her arms around her as they cautiously enter the apartment behind Meredith barging in with purpose. Sarah makes no move to follow, huffing and rolling her eyes in the hall.

"Sarah," Meredith warns without ever turning around. Sarah appears in the doorway, arms folded tightly across her chest. Ignoring her mom, she takes her glare and sits on the couch.

"Olivia?" Meredith walks through the apartment calling for her daughter. Jane looks out the window, finding Olivia exactly where she thought she'd be. Cigarette in hand, she sits on her balcony with a look on her face that Jane doesn't recognize. Amy comes to see what she's looking at, Meredith behind them cleaning up, unaware that Olivia's actually home.

"Something's wrong," Jane whispers. "Ollie doesn't act like this." Amy sighs softly but says nothing. She turns to Sarah, still scowling on the couch. They catch each other's eyes, and Sarah's expression hardens.

"What is she out there moping?" Her sisters ignore her, but a few seconds later they watch as Sarah appears next to Olivia. Jane pulls the window open enough to hear.

"Dude, what exactly is your issue?"

Olivia flicks the cigarette away, just missing Sarah, who doesn't flinch. "I'm not talking about anything with you," she says coldly.

"Fuckin Christ, are you serious right now? You're gonna keep acting like this, have mom come over here all worried about you, about nothing - "

"I don't want to see you!" Olivia screams, jumping up to get in Sarah's face. Jane is the one that startles as Sarah stands her ground. She's never seen her sister like this, and her expression is no longer sarcastic and annoyed, but confused. She starts to back away, unsure of what's happening.

"Too bad," she says. "I want to know why you're so mad at me. What is it that I did?" Sarah's voice gives a little, surprising everyone. It's enough to soften Olivia because she takes a step back, her face falling.

"It's not - you didn't…do - " Olivia can't finish what she wants to say, and with a hand to her face, she collapses into the chair. Sarah rushes to join her, squeezing herself into the space with her distraught sister. She throws her arms around Olivia as she breaks down.

"Ollie," Sarah murmurs. "What's going on?"

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