Happy Birthday To My Soul Sister

Happy Birthday To My Soul Sister

I don't know about you, but I think you're 22
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My Dearest Florence,

On January 9, 1995, the world was blessed with a wonderful gal named Christina, and guess what? That's you! Twenty-two years later and you're still my best friend. I thought since twenty-two isn't a huge birthday, I'd make it one by writing an article about you.

Having your best friend as your cousin is honestly the best because we are always going to have to love each other no matter what. It is seriously my favorite thing knowing that I can walk across the street and I am at your house. Knowing that you are literally always there, whether or not you know I am coming or not. I want to thank you for always supporting me on everything. Whether it was a decision or something I did, you are always by my side.

Thank you for treating me more like a sister than a cousin, and even more like a sister than just a friend. Thank you for sticking by my side during my darkest days, and being there to enjoy my lightest days as well. Thank you for helping me become an adult along with you, even though being an adult sucks! Thank you for letting your puppies be mine, and your brothers mine too. Most importantly, thank you for being the role model I have looked up to for as long as I can remember. I only hope one day I can be half the woman that you are.

Always remember how much people love you, and to never stop following your heart. Have a wonderful birthday, and remember I love you always.

Enjoy your day, Wilma

Cover Image Credit: Kara Hickey

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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Celebrating The Grand Canyon's 100th Birthday

Cheers to 100 years of climbing, camping, and boat trips down the Colorado River.

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100 years ago last week, the Grand Canyon was established as the 17th National Park. Covering nearly 2,000 square miles of incredible desert wilderness, the Grand Canyon is consistently among the most visited parks and is recognized globally as a true wonder of the world.

While the canyon layers were formed long before dinosaurs roamed, fossils of ancient marine animals are often uncovered – some dating back 1.2 billion years.

The Great Unconformity refers to a gap in the rock record between Cambrian times (~550 m.y. ago) and the pre-Cambrian (anything earlier). An unconformity is a surface in the rock record, in the stratigraphic column, representing a time from which no rocks are preserved — a geological mystery of epic proportions.

Meaning 250 million-year-old sediment layers can be found right on top of layers holding those very same billion-year-old fossils. What happened to the millions of years in between? Nobody knows yet.

Of the many unconformities observed in geological strata, the term Great Unconformity is frequently applied to either the unconformity observed by James Hutton in 1787 at Siccar Point in Scotland or that observed by John Wesley Powell in the Grand Canyon in 1869.

These are both exceptional examples of instances where the contacts between sedimentary strata and either sedimentary or crystalline strata of greatly different ages, origins, and structure represent periods of geologic time sufficiently long to raise great mountains and then erode them away.

Carved over hundreds of millions of years by the Colorado River and measuring 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide, the Grand Canyon is a major natural phenomenon, but it is also a place of deep historical mysteries and oddities as well.

It's days like today when I feel the most grateful to live where I do and to be able to appreciate so much of the great outdoors. To be able to climb and hike rocks that have existed for hundreds of millions of years.

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