Getting Fired For The First Time: What To Do
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Getting Fired For The First Time: What To Do

Here is your four-step guide to getting fired for the first time

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Getting Fired For The First Time: What To Do
Pixabay

Getting fired for the first time stirs all kinds of emotions. I remember my first time. It was four months out of finishing college. I was working in sales, going door-to-door and consistently failing to meet my quota because I could never take the job seriously. One day, the boss called me in his office and sent me home with the corny "we have to part ways" line. I was confused, sad and scared even. I spend the next weeks doing exactly what I should NOT have been doing until I managed to put myself together and recover. Here is your guide to getting fired for the first time

One day is enough to get your swag back

The worst thing you can possibly do after getting laid off is to lie in bed depressed with a large pizza and Netflix. I know that it's incredibly tempting, but that's a huge mistake. Do not panic and do not go into depression mode. Overall, try to avoid being emotional about it. Getting fired is something normal nowadays. We don't have the stability that our parents did. Why? Well, the 2008 recession hit us pretty hard on one hand. On the other hand, we, millennials are kind of job-hoppers. We know that job stability isn't the same as life stability.

We get bored easily and are incredibly entrepreneurial. I quit a bank job two years ago to go travel and write a blog. We make our lives less stable in this way. but the thrill and passion that comes with pursuing something you love are unparalleled. I would choose to be a part of the gig economy any day than being in an office ever again.

The point is to remain calm and rational when you get fired. Everything will be better, but only after you pick yourself up. Remember your strengths rather than weaknesses. If you've been able to get a job once, obviously, you'll be able to do it again. The world is not ending. The sooner your brighten up and get your head right, the faster you'll be up and working again.

Image by Demeter Attila

Ask your employer for outplacement services to help you adjust

Are you familiar with outplacement services? If not, you're missing out BIG TIME. Outplacement services provide support to employees exiting the business by helping them with their resume and process of finding a new job. It's kind of like when you break up with your partner, but they still agree to come to that wedding with you that you RSVP'd for a year ago.

Good companies always provide outplacement services, because they want to keep their reputation clean. It can be tough to go into job hunting mode again after a few years of being employed. I mean, the best thing about being employed is pretty much not having to send out a million resumes and network all the time, right? Outplacement will make your life easier.

A nice severance package can be immensely helpful for starters. When I got fired recently from an office job, I used to severance package to buy a ticket to the Caribbean and pay my rent. It worked out beautifully because now, as a freelance writer, I can work from any point of the world. This was some extra money to pay the bills with, which made my trip way more fun, as I didn't have to worry about working all the time. Make sure to ask your employer for outplacement services and use them to your advantage.

Figure out why you got fired

I'm not telling you to spend hours staring our the window pondering what you did wrong to get fired. What I'm saying is to objectively look at why you were not a good fit for that job. Is it that you weren't putting in the work, or was it that you simply don't care for that industry? I've been fired from two sales jobs because I simply do not like sales. Employers always think that I'd be great at cold calling because I love talking to people. In fact, I'm one of those people who feels like she's bothering someone during a cold call. Firing me for not making sales over the phone is completely valid, I would have fired myself too, had I been my boss.

If the reason for being laid off is that you weren't a good fit for the position, that's ok. Find what it is that you are a good fit for. Are you good with numbers? Do you love to plan and host events? Are you an awesome motivator with a knack for fitness? In order to be successful, you have to leverage your strengths. Taking a job you're not good for while thinking that you'll learn and acquire new skills is a plan that often backfires. I too thought that I'd become a sales mastermind with the right training. I did not because I don't have the personality for it. Capitalize on your strong suites in order to further develop what you're good at, not start from scratch.

The best way to ensure that you're good at your job is to pick the thing you are most passionate about. How do you know what that is? Well, if you woke up tomorrow with a completely free itinerary. what would you do? Would you write? Would you cook for friends? Would you spend the day on social media (productively, of course, not stalking Kim K's Instagram)? Channel the passion for whatever activity it is and turn it into a paid gig.


Image by Pixabay

Network and apply

If you've been following all the steps above, you should be ready to get back out there again. Make sure to update your LinkedIn profile and check out what your contacts are up to. Every time I'm unemployed, I'll have at least two old classmates step up and say that their company is hiring. Not only is it a nice thing to do, but people also get cash for referring friends to their companies. Make full use of that. Ensure that your resume is polished and up to date as well, you'll need that.

Check out openings on job boards and apply. Though it's easy to apply for a position, this really is only half the work. If you really want to get the job, seek out the recruiter on LinkedIn or Twitter and start talking to them. Do not make the mistake of rambling about yourself. Find out what the recruiter is interested in and talk about that. Everyone has a hobby. If you ask me about my travels or Spanish food, I can talk for hours. Find a common ground with the recruiter and use it to build a relationship.

Remember, you are the one who needs the job more than the company needs you. Make sure to explain how you will help them. Refrain yourself from explaining how a career at company X will do wonders for your resume. Talk about how you know that company X is trying to reach the millennial market on social media and how you, as a guru in the area, can help them do so and double their accounts' following. This is just one example you can customize depending on your industry.

There you have it. Keep your head up. Getting fired really isn't that bad. I'm a two-times survivor and I can tell you that eventually, I've realized it has worked to my advantage. Follow these four steps and you'll be happier with a new career shortly.

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This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
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