The Misconceptions Of Feminism And What We Can Do To Change Them

The Misconceptions Of Feminism And What We Can Do To Change Them

There are those who have extremist views, but they do not represent the heart of what feminism is about.

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I recently saw an article treading on this website titled "I Am A Female and I Am So Over Feminists" and of course, had to read this because it caught my eye (as it should, so good job to the writer and the editor) and was completely baffled at the blatant misinterpretation of what feminism is about. Though I agree that there are a number of feminists that put down men and blame them for everything, there are also plenty that just strive for equality without necessarily resorting to gender-blaming tactics. The article writer's analysis summed up seems to be that women are doing a lot better than before, that women despite having entered the work-force after men are doing a kick-ass job (and it's true) but the concept isn't exactly there.

Let's backtrack: "feminism" as defined by google means "the advocacy of women's rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes." At no point in this does it equate to feminism meaning women now being better than men, but it does involve calling out injustices and inequality! If we see a woman is getting paid less than a fellow co-star when they're both equally important and famous, then that injustice should be addressed! It's not about being angry at all men, even though it is fun to poke at me or others, it's simply just making sure that the inequality is heard! Women are strong and independent and feminism is not arguing that women cannot be vulnerable and also find a companion in a man if they are feminists. That's a misconception!

I've heard women like Emma Watson, goodwill ambassador for UN Women, and Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani activist for female education, talk about the notions of feminism so eloquently and educated that I feel like they are worthy of being shared below:

Malala explains how everyone can participate in being feminists.

As Emma Watson says, "Fighting for women's rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating...this has to stop."

If you took the time to watch some of these clips, you come to understand where I'm getting at with this article. Hating on men is NOT synonymous with feminism. It's not about thinking a man to be rude when they compliment women or offer help, but about allowing women to feel empowered in and of themselves. They don't need men to tell them that they are worthy, but it is not something that is discouraged so long as it is done appropriately and correctly.

I agree that the United States and many European nations have come far in women's rights, but just getting far does not equate to being equal. Progress is not synonymous with equality. When women are paid the same as men, when they are afforded the same respect, when they are given fair representation on behalf of rights that pertain to them and not men - that's when equality is reached. I cannot possibly phrase this as well as Emma Watson did, but this is my way, as a man, to explain that I can be a feminist without hating my own gender.

I notice how women are treated and how men are raised in misogynistic manners and it irks me. Real feminism is not just advocating for women's rights, it's about advocating for men to let down their guards, to be allowed to be vulnerable. The writer of the article I mentioned earlier said how she thinks it's okay for women to be vulnerable in front of men, but what about the opposite? Men should feel the same. Women and men should be treated equally all throughout, in personal expectations, in society, and in their emotions.

Feminism is not so easily summed up to man-hating, and I despise seeing people who misinterpret the concept because of others who say or do things in the name of feminism. The problem lies in ill-educated individuals who contort the ideal a frame it in a way that works for their personal goals. I too hate self-proclaimed feminists that do not understand what they are advocating for, but you cannot sum up those poor educated individuals to represent a whole faction of women.

For the writer of that article, you stated how women are kick-ass and doing amazing for themselves, and I agree! What about women who are lazy? Are they going to ruin your statement? Are a few inactive people going to make your thoughts any less true? This is what I mean. Misguided feminists who do not understand the true concept of it are not the ones to listen to. Look up to individuals like Malala and Emma who define it much better than I ever will.

I want to reiterate this once more because it is just insanely true: women are kick-ass. If they are so kick-ass and doing well for themselves, then let's all be feminists and promote a healthy environment of gender equality that not only continuously benefits the women doing so well for themselves, but also the men who have been affected by societal norms too!

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6 Things You Should Know About The Woman Who Can't Stand Modern Feminism

Yes, she wants to be heard too.

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2018 is sort of a trap for this woman. She believes in women with all of the fire inside of her, but it is hard for her to offer support when people are making fools of themselves and disguising it as feminism.

The fact of the matter is that women possess qualities that men don't and men possess qualities that women don't. That is natural. Plus, no one sees men parading the streets in penis costumes complaining that they don't get to carry their own fetus for nine months.

1. She really loves and values women.

She is incredibly proud to be a woman.

She knows the amount of power than a woman's presence alone can hold. She sees when a woman walks into a room and makes the whole place light up. She begs that you won't make her feel like a "lady hater" because she doesn't want to follow a trend that she doesn't agree with.

2. She wants equality, too

She has seen the fundamental issues in the corporate world, where women and men are not receiving equal pay.

She doesn't cheer on the businesses that don't see women and men as equivalents. But she does recognize that if she works her butt off, she can be as successful as she wants to.

3. She wears a bra.

While she knows the "I don't have to wear a bra for society" trend isn't a new one, but she doesn't quite get it. Like maybe she wants to wear a bra because it makes her feel better. Maybe she wears a bra because it is the normal things to do... And that's OK.

Maybe she wants to put wear a lacy bra and pretty makeup to feel girly on .a date night. She is confused by the women who claim to be "fighting for women," because sometimes they make her feel bad for expressing her ladyhood in a different way than them.

4. She hates creeps just as much as you do. .

Just because she isn't a feminist does not mean that she is cool with the gruesome reality that 1 in 5 women are sexually abused.

In fact, this makes her stomach turn inside out to think about. She knows and loves people who have been through such a tragedy and wants to put the terrible, creepy, sexually charged criminals behind bars just as bad as the next woman.

Remember that just because she isn't a feminist doesn't mean she thinks awful men can do whatever they want.

5. There is a reason she is ashamed of 2018's version of feminism.

She looks at women in history who have made a difference and is miserably blown away by modern feminism's performance.

Not only have women in the past won themselves the right to vote, but also the right to buy birth control and have credit cards in their names and EVEN saw marital rape become a criminal offense.

None of them dressed in vagina costumes to win anyone over though... Crazy, right?

6. She isn't going to dress in a lady parts costume to prove a point.

This leaves her speechless. It is like the women around her have absolutely lost their minds and their agendas, only lessening their own credibility.

"Mom, what are those ladies on TV dressed up as?"

"Ummm... it looks to me like they are pink taco's honey."

She loves who she is and she cherished what makes her different from the men around her. She doesn't want to compromise who she is as a woman just so she can be "equal with men."

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The End Of The Walker Era: Wisconsin Chooses Divided Government

Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Evers will take over in Madison in January.

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I was reminded of the enmity of our politics in a peculiar way the other day. As one of but a handful of Midwestern transplants to the South, I normally take note when I recognize someone from my home region. Such was the case when I noticed a girl donning a Milwaukee Brewers baseball cap.

"Oh, so you're from Wisconsin?" I asked her, eager to engage on a hearty banter about cheese, beer, brats, and the like.

"No, but my dad is. We're celebrating the results of the Wisconsin governor's election."

A strange way to make a political statement indeed. After all, of all the things a Brewers cap could symbolize (they did just come one game short of the World Series after all) she had chosen politicization.

But the best part? As she had said, she wasn't from Wisconsin. She was from North Carolina.

Such are the attitudes that Gov. Scott Walker has managed to engender in his eight years in office. A polarizing figure that had already run the race three times before, becoming the first governor in American history to survive a recall attempt in 2012, Walker has garnered a special place in the heart of conservatives for standing up to unions, and a special contempt from Democrats for doing much the same.

But Walker's defeat in the most recent gubernatorial election is an indicator of a lot more than merely his actions. After all, Walker's signature piece of legislation that dismantled union power, Act 10, was signed into law his first year in office, 2011. Wisconsinites had attempted to punish him for doing so in the recall in 2012 and again during the general election in 2014. Both times they failed to do so.

No, Walker's defeat in the here and now is much more about the nationalization (or the newfound parliamentary nature of American politics as I recently saw a pundit point out) of his race and his state than any action taken by Walker himself. After all, Walker just recently inked a deal with the Taiwanese Foxconn to build a massive production plant in the southeastern Wisconsin area. Unemployment has been at record lows and the budget hasn't been a concern in virtually all of the Walker era.

No, Walker's defeat is, as much of American politics is, about Trump.

My colleague from North Carolina makes it apparent: there remains a deep displeasure with Walker in Wisconsin politics. And while this may have served his opponent, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Evers, with a magnificent starting point, it was hardly the sole reasoning of his downfall. Perhaps it was an unwillingness of Walker to stand up passionately to Trump (a fault of many modern Republicans), but independents turned on Walker this election cycle like they never had before.

And it wasn't just Wisconsin. Republican gubernatorial candidates in Michigan and Illinois, states where Republicans had held those seats, lost their bids too. Gov. Kim Reynolds of Iowa almost joined them. Walker's loss might be heralded by many a Milwaukee or Madison liberal as just comeuppance, but it's much bigger than that. It's all much bigger than that.

I'll make no equivocations. I was a supporter of Gov. Walker. In my eyes, he dismantled a politicized machine that served the Democratic Party more than it served Wisconsin workers. His right-to-work legislation, allowing workers to decide if they want to be in unions and not the other way around, was a huge win for individual liberty. The castle doctrine allows similar freedoms in giving citizens the ability of self-defense in their own homes. And now Foxconn will soon begin operations, a massive contributor to employment in Wisconsin.

Granted, none of these measures come without controversy, but I think it is difficult to say that Wisconsin is not better in terms of personal and economic freedom now then it was prior to Walker's administration.

But so, things ebb and flow. There was every possibility that Walker would lose, just as there is every possibility that Governor-elect Evers will lose in 2022. Such is the nature of the democratic process. But for now, with a still Republican-controlled legislature, the people of Wisconsin have chosen a house divided.

Let's hope we can keep moving forward.

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