I Am A Female And I Am So Over Feminists

I Am A Female And I Am So Over Feminists

I believe that I am a strong woman, but I also believe in a strong man.
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Beliefs are beliefs, and everyone is entitled to their opinion. I'm all about girl power, but in today's world, it's getting shoved down our throats. Relax feminists, we're OK.

My inspiration actually came from a man (God forbid, a man has ideas these days). One afternoon my boyfriend was telling me about a discussion his class had regarding female sports and how TV stations air fewer female competitions than that of males. In a room where he and his other male classmate were completely outnumbered, he didn't have much say in the discussion.

Apparently, it was getting pretty heated in the room, and the women in the class were going on and on about how society is unfair to women in this aspect and that respect for the female population is shrinking relative to the male population.

If we're being frank here, it's a load of bull.

SEE ALSO: To The Women Who Hate Feminism

First of all, this is the 21st century. Women have never been more respected. Women have more rights in the United States than ever before. As far as sports go, TV stations are going to air the sports that get the most ratings. On a realistic level, how many women are turning on Sports Center in the middle of the day? Not enough for TV stations to make money. It's a business, not a boycott against female athletics.

Whatever happened to chivalry? Why is it so “old fashioned" to allow a man to do the dirty work or pay for meals? Feminists claim that this is a sign of disrespect, yet when a man offers to pick up the check or help fix a flat tire (aka being a gentleman), they become offended. It seems like a bit of a double standard to me. There is a distinct divide between both the mental and physical makeup of a male and female body. There is a reason for this. We are not equals. The male is made of more muscle mass, and the woman has a more efficient brain (I mean, I think that's pretty freaking awesome).

The male body is meant to endure more physical while the female is more delicate. So, quite frankly, at a certain point in life, there need to be restrictions on integrating the two. For example, during that same class discussion that I mentioned before, one of the young ladies in the room complained about how the NFL doesn't have female athletes. I mean, really? Can you imagine being tackled by a 220-pound linebacker? Of course not. Our bodies are different. It's not “inequality," it's just science.

And while I can understand the concern in regard to money and women making statistically less than men do, let's consider some historical facts. If we think about it, women branching out into the workforce is still relatively new in terms of history. Up until about the '80s or so, many women didn't work as much as they do now (no disrespect to the women that did work to provide for themselves and their families — you go ladies!). We are still climbing the charts in 2016.

Though there is still considered to be a glass ceiling for the working female, it's being shattered by the perseverance and strong mentality of women everywhere. So, let's stop blaming men and society for how we continue to “struggle" and praise the female gender for working hard to make a mark in today's workforce. We're doing a kick-ass job, let's stop the complaining.

I consider myself to be a very strong and independent female. But that doesn't mean that I feel the need to put down the opposite gender for every problem I endure. Not everything is a man's fault. Let's be realistic ladies, just as much as they are boneheads from time to time, we have the tendency to be a real pain in the tush.

It's a lot of give and take. We don't have to pretend we don't need our men every once in a while. It's OK to be vulnerable. Men and women are meant to complement one another — not to be equal or to over-power. The genders are meant to balance each other out. There's nothing wrong with it.

I am all for being a proud woman and having confidence in what I say and do. I believe in myself as a powerful female and human being. However, I don't believe that being a female entitles me to put down men and claim to be the “dominant" gender. There is no “dominant" gender. There's just men and women. Women and men. We coincide with each other, that's that.

Time to embrace it.

Cover Image Credit: chrisjohnbeckett / Flickr

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13 Signs You Grew Up In The 2000s

Get ready to feel nostalgic
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The 2000s, generally referred to as the decade falling between 2000 and 2009. However, these 10 years were so much more dear to our hearts and definitely cannot be limited to this simplified definition. From hopes that you had the best kooky pen collection, to dreaming about making it to see the year 3000, there was never a dull moment. So, put on those terry cloth sweatpants, charge up that nano iPod, and read about the signs that prove you grew up in the best decade:

1. You might have jammed out to “Girlfriend” by Avril Lavigne on your nano IPod

Yes you had one, and your playlists consisted of the best songs the 2000s had to offer; All American Rejects, Fall Out Boy, The Killers and of course Avril Lavigne.

2. You treated your tamagotchi as if it were your child

This hand held digital pet probably occupied a little too much of your time. You spent your days feeding it scones and watching them reach a new life cycle.

3. Your wardrobe consisted of every color Juicy sweatsuit and Ed hardy tees...

Thank god these terrycloth outfits made a comeback!... Right?

4. ... Oh, and gauchos, you LOVED gauchos

These pants took over your wardrobe before yoga pants came into your life. Gauchos flooded the playground in pink, blue and tie-dye. I miss you gauchos.

5. You had the debate with your friends over whether Webkinz or Club Penguin was better, but you begged your parents for a membership to both

As soon as you logged onto your account your afternoon was booked up. While on your Webkinz you visited the curio shop, got a checkup with Dr. Quack, made a hamburger in the employment office and played cash cow in the arcade.

6. Your friends always had these in their pantry

At the end of a long, hard day of multiplication, going to your friends house for a playdate and indulging in a cosmic brownie was a necessity.

7. This was your first experience with makeup, and a cell phone

This accessory gave the lyrics "my lipgloss is cool my lipgloss be poppin" a whole new meaning. Pretending to answer the phone while smearing your lips in every color imaginable; this was the perfect mix of feeling like you were a teenager while also staying true to your child like self.

8. Lizzie Mcguire was the first ever Bitmoji

You watched her on Disney Channel as Lizzie McGuire, admired her fashion sense, and sang to "Hey Now" an endless amount of times. Hillary Duff was the definition of goals.

9. The auctioning off of silly bandz in elementary school was basically Wallstreet

The must have accessory of the 2000s.

10. You would beg your mom to buy you lunchables when you walked down the frozen food isle

Looking back on it now, eating these was probably not the best idea.

11. You had a favorite Jonas Brother

And it was NEVER Kevin.

12. You dreamed of riding around in a JetX just like the kids in PCA

You put getting a JetX on your To-Do list right under making a key necklace.

13. Instead of homework, your after school activities consisted of watching THE BEST Disney Channel and Nickelodeon shows

Disney Channel and Nickelodeon will sadly never be the same. Classics include: Hannah Montana, Ned's Declassified, Suite Life of Zack and Cody and That's so Raven.

Don't you want to just go back in time and bask in the simple days where all you cared about was how good your blue eyeshadow looked and when the next Disney Channel Original movie would come on?

Cover Image Credit: flickr

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I Lost Two Babies Before Age 20, And I’m Proud Of Alabama For Banning Abortion

Life begins at conception.

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Gov. Kay Ivey signed the Alabama Human Life Protection Act into law on May 15 after it passed with flying colors in both branches of Alabama legislature.

The Alabama Human Life Protection Act will criminalize abortions in Alabama, with a "successful abortion" being a Class A felony (punishable by up to 99 years in prison), and an "attempted abortion" being a Class C penalty.

Before moving on, I feel as though I need to point out that these felony charges are NOT for the woman, but for the doctor/professional who performs the abortion.

Much of the opposition comes from the lack of exceptions for cases of rape and incest. However, there is an exception in cases where the mother's life is at extreme risk.

SEE ALSO: Alabama's Abortion Ban, Passed Into Law By 25 Men, Is Not Pro-Life — It's Anti-Woman

I've seen A LOT of posts lately from the liberal/pro-choice side of the issue, with little public representation (outside of personal social media outlets) from the pro-life side. So, here is my take on the matter.

I've always been a very open person and someone who can at least listen to (and respect) the opinions of others, even when they don't match my own beliefs. But the topic of abortion is my only exception.

I will NEVER be able to fathom how anyone in their right minds can support abortion. To me, it isn't an issue of pure opinion. It's about morals. Either you're okay with the murdering of unborn children or you're not. And unless you are in the latter group, your morals should be in question.

My opinions and beliefs on abortion are not based on culture or religion. When I was young, it could be argued that my raising or my Christian beliefs could be "to blame" for my pro-life stance. However, that is no longer the case. While I do still live in the same culture and still believe in the same religion, my stance is all my own, based on my own life experiences.

I became pregnant at 17 and was certainly scared out of my mind, but I made my choices and my own careless actions resulted in the conception of that beautiful, unmistakable life that grew inside of me.

But I lost that little life due to circumstances that I could not control.

At 19, I became pregnant again, for an even shorter period of time. Honestly, even in such early stages of pregnancy, there is still proof of that life inside of you. Little things that sometimes are hard to notice and sometimes are hard to ignore. I knew I was pregnant very early on both times, but I can promise you that, while one pregnancy was planned and one was not, that little life inside of me was ALWAYS a life.

From the moment I conceived, there was a life separate from my own.

As a woman who has lost pregnancies and worries about her future fertility, it angers me to even begin to think about a careless woman taking the life of her child due to her own selfish agenda.

Some argue that while our adoption and foster system are overrun, abortions should continue (and are considered to be the most viable option). Honestly, though, our world is crowded, over-populated, and dying, but you don't see liberals promoting mass genocide and murder just to protect and/or save the other half of the population.

SEE ALSO: I'm A Small Town Christian From Alabama, But As A Woman, I Cannot Support Banning Abortion

No one is standing up and saying, "But wouldn't it be better for everyone just to kill off half of us? Those who die will not have to suffer and those who live will prosper." Isn't that sort of what abortion is? Murdering a select group of life, just to save them from suffering and to protect those still here?

While I understand the utter travesty and pain of those impregnated due to rape, who are we to decide that the life of a baby conceived in such ways is any less important than another? I get that the lack of exceptions is infuriating to those who already believe abortion to be justified.

But honestly, a life is a life is a life.

One life is no more or less worthy of protection than another.

The state of Alabama and its elected officials have shown bravery and efficiency these past couple weeks. Their hard work and dedication have brought this state honor and pride.

Rep. Terri Collins, the bill's sponsor, is courageous and strong. Even though the risks and backlash were known, Collins pushed this bill anyway and saw to it that the state of Alabama would no longer sit by the wayside and be a part of the murdering of innocent, unborn children.

I'm so glad that my home state now has the most strict laws on abortion in the United States since Roe v. Wade.

I firmly believe in The Alabama Human Life Protection Act.

I proudly stand with Alabama and its elected officials because life begins at conception.

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