If Disney Characters Were The College Grads You'll Be Walking Across The Stage With

If Disney Characters Were The College Grads You'll Be Walking Across The Stage With

Every single one of you falls into at least one of these categories.
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There are many different types of graduating seniors: the one going to grad school, the “gap year” friend, etc. Here is what each of your friends is, as defined by Disney.

1. The one who got a full-time offer in August: Lt. Judy Hopps

This friend just really always has their stuff together. They got an offer — probably for a much higher salary than you — right out of their equally impressive internship, and they coast through senior year without a care in the world. They’ve always known what they wanted to do and they were determined to get it done!

2. The one going to grad school: Belle

This is the friend that LOVES SCHOOL SO MUCH. They have been perfectly content spending every day studying and would love for this to be something they do for another one to six years. Most likely, they are still going to get paid less than the average graduate because they’re pursuing their career because of passion rather than financial stability.

3. The one taking a gap year: Moana

They’ve been looking for adventure their entire lives, and are finally taking the chance to go on a life-changing journey of self-discovery in hopes that they will come back and the answer to “what should I do with my life” will be waiting for them.

4. The one going back home: Pacha

Sometimes you just need to take it back to your roots, and this friend, like Pacha, is looking to go home to find comfort. They may have a great paying job, or may just want to take it easy for a while, but they value their family time more than anything else.

5. The one who gets hired at the last minute: Mike Wazowski

This friend is like Mike in college — they aren’t really given any credit when it comes to academics until the last minute when they get their dream job and end up doing terrifically. And just like Mike in the OG Monsters movie, they end up being the star of the show and thrive wherever they are.

6. The one who still doesn't know what they're going to do: Dory

This is the person who everything just always seems to work out for. Like Dory, they’re kind of just floating around, waiting for an opportunity to drift their way. They don’t have a job — or any prospect of one for that matter — but they’ll probably land one a few months after they graduate and will end up being happy.

7. The "ring by spring" couple: Anna and Hans

This couple rushed into the whole “relationship” thing. They are getting married within a year, and have already figured out everything about their lives after they graduate. They seem to have everything figured out and are known in their circle as the “Golden Couple,” for now.

8. The one who JUST decided their major: Rapunzel

This person is pretty scattered, hopping from one major to another until it’s too late to change it again. Don’t worry though, the job that they get will be one they choose out of passion, so their major really won’t have anything to do with it anyway.

9. The one who took a victory lap: Lightning McQueen

This one just wanted to go for a scenic drive rather than a full-on Piston Cup. They stayed in the game a bit longer than most people, but in the end, they are in the same position as anyone else graduating at this time.

10. The one who is taking over the family business: Simba

This friend majored in entrepreneurship and has been mentally checked out of college for at least three years. Like Simba, their path has been laid out for them, so they haven’t really had to worry about anything except getting their diploma.

11. The one with something to prove: Mulan

This is your friend who had the hardest major, took the most challenging electives, and is picking a job because of the high salary. When you ask them how they feel about graduating, they are the “man with a plan” and seem to have no fears about graduating and what it might bring.

12. The one moving to Disneyland: Peter Pan

They took “never grow up” a little too seriously, so instead of getting a normal adult job, they’re doing the Disney College Program until further notice.

Cover Image Credit: Disney

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Why You Actually Don't Want To Be Prescribed Adderall

ADD isn't all that it's cracked up to be.
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As I'm writing this, I can feel my concentration slipping. Noises have become enticing, I feel distanced from my phone, and every time someone walks by me in the library, I turn around seeing if it's someone I know. My extended-release Adderall is starting to wear off and my brain is starting to relax back to its natural state. My ADD is climbing out from underneath the blanket of focus I had for 10 hours today.

ADD is not all that it's cracked up to be. Sure, we get prescribed the precious Adderall so many people want, but at what cost? Let me put this in context for you. You know when you're at the library and there's a one really, really loud girl talking on the phone? You know the one. The girl that, for some reason, thinks it's OK to have a full-fledged conversation with her mom about her boyfriend in the middle of the quiet section. The girl that's talking so loud that it's all you can think about, occupying all of your focus. Well, that's what every single person in the room is like when you have ADD.

Distractions that are easy to ignore to someone without ADD are intensified and, instead of focusing on the task at hand, I'm listening to the girl three seats down from me eat her barbecue kettle chips. When you have ADD, it's not just schoolwork you can't focus on. You can't focus on anything. I tried to watch a foreign film one time without my medicine, and I forgot to pay attention to the subtitles. I realized about halfway through the movie that I had no idea what was going on.

What almost everyone that asks me for my Adderall doesn't understand is that I take Adderall to focus how you would normally. When you take my Adderall you feel like you can solve the world's problems. You can bang out an entire project in one night. You can cram for an entire exam fueled by this surge of motivation that seems super-hero-like.

You take my Adderall and ask me, “Is this how you feel all the time?" And, unfortunately, my answer is no. I'll never feel like a limitless mastermind. When I take Adderall, I become a normal human being. I can finish a normal amount of work, in a normal amount of time.

My brain works in two modes: on Adderall, and off Adderall. On Adderall, I'm attentive, motivated and energetic. Off Adderall, I can barely get up the motivation and focus to clean my room or send an email. And it's frustrating. I'm frustrated with my lack of drive. I'm frustrated that this is how my brain operates. Scattered, spastic and very, very unorganized. There's nothing desirable about not being able to finish a sentence because you lost thought mid-way through.

The worst thing that you can say to anyone with ADD is, “I think I should start taking Adderall." Having ADD isn't a free pass to get super-pills, having ADD means you have a disability. I take Adderall because I have a disability, and it wasn't a choice I had a say in. I was tested for ADD my freshman year of college.

My parents were skeptical because they didn't know exactly what ADD was. To them, the kids with ADD were the bad kids in school that caused a scene and were constantly sent out of class. Not an above average student in her first year at a university. I went to a counselor and, after I was diagnosed with ADD, told me with a straight mouth, “Marissa this is something you're going to have to take for the rest of your life."

When the late-night assignments and cramming for the tests are over, and we're all out in the real world, I'm still going to be taking Adderall. When I'm raising a family and have to take the right kid to the right place for soccer practice, I'm still going be taking Adderall. And when I'm trying to remember the numbers they just said for bingo at my nursing home, I'm still going to be taking Adderall.

So you tell me you're jealous that I get prescribed Adderall? Don't be. I'm jealous that you can drink a cup a coffee and motivate yourself once you lose focus. I'm jealous that the success of your day doesn't depend on whether or not you took a pill that morning. The idea of waking up and performing a full day without my medicine is foreign to me.

My brain works in two modes, and I don't know which one is the right one. I don't know which mode is the one the big man upstairs wants me to operate in. So before you say you want to be prescribed to Adderall, ask yourself if you need and want to operate in two different modes.

Ask yourself if you want to rely on medicine to make your entire life work. If I had a choice, I would choose coffee like the rest of the world.

Cover Image Credit: Flickr

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College Admissions Should Not Be A Game Of Who Can Pay The Most, Legally Or Illegally

College admissions is supposed to be a fair shot for all kids, not a competition of who can pay the most to get in.

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My mother taught me that education is the most important thing in my life and that education always comes first. My mother taught me that in order to succeed in life I had to work hard and learn how to become something on my own. I was taught to use everything that my parents have given me to make a better life for myself. Through these values, I learned just how vital getting a good education is and just how hard I had to work to succeed academically.

Unfortunately, there are those entitled parents that believe that money can buy everything. Money shouldn't be able to buy everything, especially college admissions. However, recent events have proven that a good amount of money can buy admissions into elite colleges. College admissions are supposed to be a fair shot for all kids, not a competition of who can pay the most to get in.

Recently, a huge college admissions scandal has been unfolded that involves celebrities and big names in the business, including Lori Loughlin, the actress who played Aunt Becky on "Full House." Basically, through a supposed non-profit, known as The Key, wealthy parents were able to "donate" money to this "college counseling company." Through the "donations" made, The Key was used to bribe athletic college coaches and test administrators in order to benefit the children of the parents. Events like this make me question if working hard is even worth it since privilege is so pertinent in this country. It boggles my mind the lengths that these wealthy parents went through to get their kids into big name schools.

It's crazy to me how these families had the money and resources available to provide their kids with world-renowned tutors, prep books or athletic trainers, but they chose to cheat the system and bribe their way into college.

Rich, entitled and privileged kids get into these amazing colleges and take spots from deserving, unprivileged students, who have worked their entire lives and overcome several obstacles to get where they are. It's unfair and appalling. These children already have privileges beyond most people. There are kids that literally depend on going to college to have any kind of future for themselves. Buying your way through life eventually catches up to you and I hope that these families are persecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

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