The 10 Commandments Of College Every Student Must Obey To Just Be Normal

The 10 Commandments Of College Every Student Must Obey To Just Be Normal

These are just the rules.
505311
views

A lot of times in life, there are unwritten rules like the whole "don't chew with your mouth open."

You won't technically get in trouble for them but society has just agreed that we're all gonna follow them because it seems like the right thing to do. Well, college is very similar. They've been around since the beginning of time and there's an unwritten contract everyone signs right after you enroll in your first class.

Thus I have put them down in writing finally so there can be no excuses for breaking, what is now known as the 10 Commandments of College

1. Thou shall not sit in my unassigned, assigned seat.

The place you sit on the first day is the place you'll sit for the rest of the year, and if you break this invisible seating chart you WILL enrage the entire class because you've thrown off the entire ecosystem.

2. Thou shall choose their seat wisely.

Not only is the location important because no one wants to be in the front row, but the person you sit next to is about to be your best friend whose name you never learn but you ask to see their notes when the professor changes the slide too quick, or they ask you when the homework is due... Choose wisely.

3. Thou shall not remind the professor to collect homework.

If the professor forgets to collect homework, do not, under ANY circumstances remind them. Don't be that kid, nobody likes that kid. In fact, everyone probably hates that kid whether they did the homework or not.

4. Thou shall not remind the professor class has more time than they thought.

Although the slip up is rare, it is a beautiful gem. If the professor thinks the class gets out earlier than it's supposed to, don't tell them they still have time. This is also the kind of kid you don't want to be. Your silly remark will definitely be followed by groans and dirty looks.

5. Thou shall read the syllabus before they speak.

Do not waste my class time asking a question you would have known the answer to had you read a little book of actual WRITTEN RULES.

6. Thou shall participate in group work.

Everyone dreads group work to begin with, so don't be a freeloader just along for the ride to an A. Actually bring something to the table.

7. Thou shall not judge.

This isn't high school. If I want to ride my scooter to class I will 100% ride my scooter to class, and you should be jealous and inspired by my brilliant idea.

8. Thou shall share the wealth.

This applies to every part of college. You're 21? Supply for the less fortunate (obvs responsibly). Your nameless friend from class missed lecture? Give them the notes, no questions asked. Your mom just sent a care package? Give your roomie a couple of those homemade cookies.

9. Thou shall be a good roommate.

Don't leave a mountain of unwashed dishes in the sink for way too long, don't listen to your music too loud or too late... just be a respectful human and I promise you'll get it in return.

10. Thou shall treat thyselves.

College is taxing. Go out on the weekends, get that mani/pedi. Go out to dinner even if your wallet is begging you not to.

Obey these and college will be a breeze. (Besides the 20-page papers and all the reading you have to do, these *probably* won't help with that).

Cover Image Credit: Flickr Creative Commons

Popular Right Now

It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
875609
views

Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Why You Should And Shouldn't Pursue A Science Degree

From personal experience, here are some actual reasons, in my opinion, why a science degree is a really bad, yet really good idea.

56
views

Since I was in maybe 6th or 7th grade, I've always dreamed of being a doctor. Don't ask me why, but for some reason, I just up and decided I wanted to pursue one of the hardest possible careers that exist. Anatomy, science, and math have always been interests of mine, but not necessarily strong-suits. These areas, for me, always take extra work and studying to excel on exams and homework versus English and history. Regardless, I ignored this. Why? I am dumb. I didn't pay attention to what my personal strengths are, but rather what my interests alone were. I guess what I am trying to say here is, through personal experience, I've learned that it's important to pay attention to what your personal talents and interests are and to find a good middle ground. This can apply to any degree, not just a science degree.

Interest in science has increased over time. As technology and medicine have advanced, people have recognized that there is a need for more people in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) field. There are more jobs available for people who pursue STEM degrees, and those jobs generally offer more money. According to Business Insider, non-STEM majors earn an average of $15,500 less per year starting salary than STEM majors. This is enticing to many but can be misleading. Science degrees are very difficult to earn, which is why they offer such high-earning salaries and give so many job opportunities after college.

If you are actually good at math and science and know the first 100 numbers of pi off the top of your head, by all means, feel free to become a neurosurgeon or aerospace engineer, but I had to learn my lesson the hard way. Just know that nobody's opinion matters but your own and this is your life. The decisions you make during these four years will affect your career for the rest of your life. Don't pursue a degree just because it will make you a lot of money. Pursue a career because you are good at it and you actually enjoy it.

Related Content

Facebook Comments