13 College Bookstore Purchases And What They Say About You

13 College Bookstore Purchases And What They Say About You

Your college visit purchases say a whole lot about how you feel about the school.
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On every single college visit, I had to visit the bookstore and normally came home having purchased something. Recently, I've had a few students shadow me on campus, and I took each of them to the bookstore to purchase some souvenirs.

Although at times I found it difficult to discern whether they were enjoying their visit or not, I found the easiest way to tell was by observing their purchases. Lots of merchandise definitely meant a lot of interest, but what do smaller purchases mean?

What you buy at a college bookstore says a lot about how you feel about the school as a whole. So, here's a break down of what each item means:

1. A t-shirt

College t-shirts are definitely a classic. Sometimes, this means, "I like the school, but I might not get in." T-shirts are a way to rep the school, without too much commitment.... or maybe you're just looking for another square for your college t-shirt quilt.

2. A sweatshirt

Once you get into sweatshirt territory, prices are starting to get a little higher. This tends to mean "I'm seriously considering going here" or "I really hope I get in." Worst comes to worst, this sweatshirt becomes pajamas in case you can't wear it on your future campus.

3. A lanyard

You're not trying to make a big monetary commitment, but you want people to know you visited. You like the school, but you're not 100% sold on it. It's easy enough to remove from your keys if you change your mind.

4. A winter hat

Your tour was just really cold and finding warmth in any way, shape, or form was the first thing on your mind.

5. A baseball hat

Your tour was really sunny and you got tired of squinting in order to see the tour guide.

6. A backpack

You bought too many things at the bookstore and needed something to carry them around in.

7. "(Insert school name here) Mom/Dad/Grandparent" merchandise

There's a 75% chance you're a teenage girl looking for a cute and funny shirt, but a 25% chance you're actually a parent hoping your child attends that university.

8. A blanket

You really loved the school and you're already planning how you're going to decorate your dorm room.

9. A laptop/water bottle sticker

It's cheap and easy enough to remove. Your commitment level is pretty low, but you came all the way here and need something to show for it.

10. An athletic t-shirt

The ultimate low-commitment item. If you don't get in, you can still be a sports fan, particularly if it's a good sports school. Or maybe you're looking forward to the sports far more than the academics.

11. A shot glass

Cause you're ~so~ college.

12. $100+ of merchandise

You're about to put down your deposit, so why not spend a little more?

13. An actual book

C'mon, who actually buys books at the bookstore?

Cover Image Credit: Instagram

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Kristin Chenoweth's Wicked Great Jewelry Collection From HSN

We all know Kristin Chenoweth as the 4'11 blonde who can sing like no other, but did you know she had a WICKED jewelry line too?
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As some of you may know, I adore Kristin Chenoweth. I also adore jewelry. Now imagine that Kristin Chenoweth has a jewelry collection on HSN. Well, SHE DOES! Recently she was on HSN showing off her stunning, gorgeous, elegant jewelry. I saw a bracelet that I just had to get! It was the "Broken Arrow" bracelet. Since I live in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, I had to get it! By the way, this 4'11 powerhouse diva is from Broken Arrow, as well!

"Broken Arrow" Bracelet

.28 ctw Sterling Silver

Only $49.95, or 4 flex payments of $12.49, on HSN.

Kristin's whole collection is so cute! You can get the pieces in silver or gold, which I love because you get a variety! I really enjoy how each piece has a story behind it. For example, back in December, I got a bangle from her collection. The bangle is called "Music Heals." Since I am very dedicated in the music world, this was also a must-have. The message behind this piece is amazing. Music really does heal and every time I wear the bracelet, I am reminded that and also reminded why I do what I do.

"Music Heals" Clef & Note Bangle

.31 ctw in Sterling Silver or Gold-Plated Sterling Silver

Only $78.00, or 4 payments of $19.50, on HSN.

Her collection ranges from bracelets, rings, earrings, and necklaces. These pieces make perfect gifts for your family, friends, or even yourself. They are delicate, shiny, and also very easy to wear with casual or fancy clothes. Oh, and if you are a hashtag lover like Kristin, then I recommend you to check out her hashtag necklace or ring because it is #toocute. Anyway, after I bought the bracelet, I decided to call back and try to get an on air call to talk to Kristin and tell her I bought a piece of jewelry! Within at least five minutes or so I was put through and got to chat with her!! I told her that I was apart of her Broadway Bootcamp this summer, and she remembered me! It was so much fun getting to chat with her about her jewelry and about this summer with her. Next thing I know, I won the birthday giveaway HSN was doing for their 39th anniversary. I won a gorgeous, stunning necklace from her collection. The name of the necklace is "Stay the Course."


"Stay The Course" Y-Drop Necklace

1.25 ctw in Sterling Silver or Gold-Plated Sterling Silver

Only $59.95, or 4 payments of $14.99, on HSN.



I can't say thank you enough to Kristin and HSN for picking me as their winner! I was so thrilled to just talk to her again and winning the necklace really topped it off. If you love jewelry like me, I highly recommend buying some from Kristin's collection. You won't regret it at all! I promise you! The prices are very reasonable and affordable. I hope you decide to get some jewelry from her collection, which you can find here at the Home Shopping Network.

Cover Image Credit: HSN

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When Patient Care Is Second To Profit, Quality Suffers As Regulations Fill The Gap

The most effective health care system in the world is crippling under the weight of ever-increasing regulation and a disconnect between delivery and management; the health of our patients are at stake and their lives are certainly worth fighting for.

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The modern U.S. health care system is highly effective and efficient at providing emergency medical care beyond that of any other country in the history of the world. However, the quality with which we provide some of the most basic of services has continued to decline over the past three decades. Simply put, the U.S. health care system has morphed into being more focused on productivity and technological advancement rather than quality patient care and cost containment. Although a capitalistic structure for macroeconomic business models is undoubtedly the most effective method to generate revenue with the most consistent quality of product (as exemplified by the U.S. economy since the industrial revolution), it appears to be largely ineffective when applied to health care where the service provided directly affects human lives. This conceptual dichotomy stems from a variety of aspects that collectively shape our perceptions of what's infecting the business of health care; each of which could be discussed ad nauseam. However, two that I'd like to touch on are that of physician involvement in the management of healthcare and the shock-wave of effects that were caused by the Medicare fee schedule.

U.S. healthcare is a $3.3 trillion industry that serves to provide 17.9% of the GDP. Integral to the delivery of that service are, undoubtedly, physicians and nurses as they are involved in its implementation on a daily basis. Why then, are the most experienced personnel in the industry almost entirely absent from the management of that system? Granted, physicians commonly go on to become hospital presidents, Chief Medical Officers, and into governmental positions, but I would argue that they should also be intricately involved in the more executive and financial positions within their individual organizations. Doing so would, not only, streamline health care delivery (as those who are providing the service are determining where resources should be allocated) but would also increase the level of trust that other health care workers have in management. In fact, a 2011 survey revealed that 56% of physicians on hospital staffs didn't trust the administration as partners because of a lack of physician leadership. Additionally, in what seems to be an exponential increase in the rate of physician burnout, even this issue may be combated due to the executive doctor now having a vested interest and influence in the growth of his or her organization.

There are a few inherent problems with doing this, however. While physicians and nurses are the primary purveyors of health care, they often-times lack the necessary business skills to effectively manage a company or organization. Educational training programs that equip physicians to fill these roles are practically non-existent, with the exception of the Alliance for Physician Leadership at UT Southwestern. This need must then be met by alternative means such as earning a non-health care MBA or simply by fostering one's own managerial skills through acquiring non-clinical experience and the ever-important aspect of networking.

In order to expound on the impacts of the Medicare fee schedule (as it pertains to the decline in the quality of healthcare), a bit of a historical backdrop is necessary. Originally devised in 1985 by Harvard Economist, William Hsiao, was commissioned by the U.S. government to measure the exact amount of work involved in each of the tasks a doctor performs. He defined work as a function of time spent, mental effort and judgement, technical skill, physical effort and stress. Overheads in training costs were also factored in. The team he assembled interviewed and surveyed physicians from approximately 24 different specialties, analyzing everything involved from 45 minutes of psychotherapy for a patient with panic attacks to a hysterectomy for a woman with cervical cancer. They determined that the hysterectomy takes 4.99 times as much work as the psychotherapy patient and used this method to evaluate thousands of other services. A relative value for everything doctors do was quantified. Congress then recommend a multiplier to convert the values into dollars and the new fee schedule was signed into law.

The fee schedule dictates which services a physician renders and governs a higher payout for more complex services than other [lesser] services. In 1992, Medicare began paying doctors accordingly and private insurance soon followed these same guidelines. Implemented as a top-down form of governance, the fee schedule is one of the primary reasons why our healthcare system has become so heavily reliant on output rather than patient care. By generating a standard that converts patient conditions to dollar signs, the focus was able to shift from patient care to generating revenue. Therefore, when the insurance companies adopted this schedule as a guideline for negotiations with physicians and hospitals, it effectively established all of health care as a business transaction instead of a service provided.

To understand what role government should play in our health care system and what the "end goal" should be, we must first understand what are the truths that we hold as self-evident and what it means for our rights to include that of "Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness." Doctor Robert Sade, in his paper on the interactions between politics and morality with that of medicine, explained that "The concept of medical care as the patient's right is immoral because it denies the most fundamental of all rights, that of a man to his own life and the freedom of action to support it. Medical care is neither a right nor a privilege: it is a service that is provided by doctors and others to people who wish to purchase it." For a governing body to unilaterally dictate health care policy is to exalt their own reasoning and logic over that of the millions of individual minds associated with health care; be it physicians, patients, nurses, or policyholders. If we claim to desire a higher quality of patient-doctor relationships then we must keep the power of decision in the hands of those who are offering and consuming the service, namely, the doctor, nurse, and citizen.

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