If you are one of those people that have had much of their life planned out since they were little, then you're a lot like me. I thought I had it all planned out. Part of that plan was my education and career path. I was completely sure of it. No changing my mind. But of course, by the title of this article, you know I was wrong. Very wrong actually.

I went to community college for my first two years, after realizing how expensive college really is, and then transferred to a four-year university. So needless to say, my third year of college is when I found out that my life plan wasn't quite going to work. Completely panicked, and terrified of disappointing my family, I had no idea what to do. And here is where the lessons begin.

1. College advisors will become, and should become, your very best friends.

Thankfully, the majority of the advisors I have has through the years have been great. They will make the change from one major to the next more seamless and less stressful.

2. Community colleges save a lot of money but can hinder you from figuring out that you need to change your major sooner.

I went to community college my first two years, and it saved my parents a lot of money. I didn't have to wake out loans because fortunately, my parents were able to pay the cost out of pocket. However, if I would have started out at a different school, like a four-year university with my first-degree program, I would have taken classes from the very beginning that would have helped me realize that the program I was in was not for me.

3. The more you do related to your major, the quicker you will learn if your major is for you.

I joined clubs, volunteered, etc. through organizations related to my major, and they were all great experiences that helped me make my decisions.

4. It is not the end of the world if you don't graduate "on time."

Changing your major, especially a drastic change, will most likely set your graduation date back a little. But it is completely OK. College is not a race. It is more important that you graduate with the degree that you're gonna be happy with, rather than finish first.

Changing my major was terrifying, but it was the best decision I ever made. It also taught me many lessons and gave me a new outlook on having my whole life planned out.