Thanks to social media and all of our favorite beauty gurus, we're constantly being exposed to new products and new tips and tricks that will supposedly help to make our beauty routine the best that it can be. With all of this information constantly being thrown at us and new techniques arising every day, it's hard to know what's actually legit.

It's no surprise that so many millennial girls still fall for beauty tricks that don't really work and can actually do more damage to your skin and hair. Below are 5 of the biggest scams in the beauty industry today:

1. Setting spray

As a freelance MUA, setting spray is something that I never use in my daily life and only break out when I'm working on a client and they want it. Why? Because it does absolutely nothing other than run the risk of your makeup becoming splotchy or running if it's sprayed too close. The trick to getting your makeup to last all day is a good setting powder. And that's all.

2. Dry shampoo

Yes, dry shampoo is convenient and can even be a life saver, but it's also linked to causing hair to fall out (no, seriously, look it up).Those who have thinner hair are more prone to looking greasy and needing to use dry shampoo, but they are also the ones who cannot afford any hair loss. As a safer substitute with the same effect, try baby powder!

3. Face masks

Listen, I love a face mask just as much as the next gal, but are they really doing all that much for you? Sure, I love a good charcoal mask that rips gunk from my pores, but otherwise, their abilities only consist of relaxing me and making me feel like I'm taking good care of my skin. In fact, face masks can even make your skin worse if you fail to wash them off fully.

4. Products that aren't FDA approved

There's a huge stigma in beauty around not using products that are FDA approved. While there are certainly many unsafe products out there being sold illegally, just because something isn't approved by the FDA it doesn't mean that it's bad for you. It's important to read up on the product and learn why it isn't FDA approved and decide if the risk is worth it. For example, many major eye shadow palettes are not FDA approved because they are too pigmented and may stain the eye. Does that mean they're too dangerous to use? Absolutely not.

5. Face primer

Just like setting spray, face primer doesn't actually make your foundation stick to your skin any better. Sure, primer can create a more matte or dewy base, and in those cases, it does have its benefits. However, if you're looking to keep your pores unclogged and prevent your skin from drying out, you'll find that any moisturizer is a cheaper, and just as effective, solution.

At the end of the day, whatever products work for you, work for you.