The Best Places To Eat In Suffolk County, L.I.

The Best Places To Eat In Suffolk County, L.I.

These local eateries are sure to please even those with the pickiest palates.
1024
views

1. Caffe Amici, Selden

This place has gigantic family-sized platters of Italian food that will make anybody's green, white, and red shine bright. Serving up pizza and take-out on one side with a full sit-down restaurant and bar on the other, it's the best of both worlds. My favorite, although a classic, is their pappardelle made with a sweet sausage ragu and a touch of truffle oil. With tons (and I mean tons) of dishes to choose from, it's hard for anyone to leave feeling hungry. And the cheesy, oily garlic rolls—don't even get me started.

2. Peninsula Restaurant, Bay Shore

If you love great Chinese and Japanese cuisine, then this place is for you. This place is absolutely beautiful, with fish tanks aligning the entrance, koi ponds through out the restaurant, and a full sushi bar for guests to admire. From crunchy dragon rolls to tangy wok grilled garlic shrimp, Peninsula has yet to disappoint.

3. Bagels Your Way Cafe, Medford

Everyone knows that Long Island is known for their bagels and egg sandwiches, but if you're searching for the best then look no further than this gem in Medford. My boyfriend turned me on to this deli when we started dating, and I have to say, it is hard for others to compete. Not only do they serve a variety of breakfast specialities and delicious heroes, but they also have a wide assortment of delectable bakery items, especially their freshly-made chocolate chip or Reese's Peanut Butter Cup cookies.

4. Bubba's Burrito Bar, Islip

If you live on Long Island, it seems like everyone has heard of this crazy yet delicious joint. Though for those who are still in the dark about this gem, it's time you know where the real food magic happens. When you hear "burrito," you might assume they only specialize in classic Mexican cuisine. However, that's not the deal for Bubba's at all. Serving up alongside their burritos are a variety of tacos, salads, nachos, and quesadillas. Most famously known is their Guilt Trip, which is stuffed with chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks, fried potatoes, bacon, cheese, sour cream, and their signature baja sauce. Heaven sent in a beachy little paradise? You have no idea.

5. Toast Coffeehouse, Port Jefferson and Patchogue

Do you love gourmet dishes and creative beverages in an urban yet relaxed coffee shop setting? Please, do yourself a favor and get down to Toast at one of their two locations in Port Jefferson or Patchogue. Although dinner is only served at their original Port Jefferson location, this delicacy makes up for it with their to-die-for breakfast foods such as The Krispy Nutella French Toast or their savory lunch items such as their RB Famous, which entails roast beef, grilled portobello, red onion, and fresh mozzarella on toasted focaccia with their own basil mayo. If you're feeling thirsty, I highly recommend ordering one of their several different coffee flavors, smoothies, mimosas, and other cold beverages. The green tea iced tea infused with pineapple is God's gift to humanity—just saying.

6. Off the Block Kitchen and Meats, Sayville

Looking for an old-school butcher shop but with a modern, rustic twist? Off the Block in Sayville is sure to impress just shortly after their opening on December 16. From dry-aged steaks to organic free-range chicken to Berkshire pork, there's sure to be something that even a meat hater would love. Not only do they sell chops to-go, but they're also a restaurant, serving up burgers such as the Smokehouse Burger with their signature OTB spice, applewood bacon, frizzled shallots, and house-smoked gouda on a brioche roll. Plus, it's essential that you don't leave without trying their Apple Glazed Brussels. Seriously, you won't regret it.

7. 668 the GigShack, Montauk

668 is the perfect place if you're looking for a great bite to eat out East. With their Global Surf cuisine, created with local ingredients and accompanied by live music, it's no wonder people know this as the gem of Montauk. If you're looking to grab a drink at the bar or get your hands on their Choripan, which is grilled Argentine chorizo topped with melted provolone and chimichurri on a toasted baguette, you're out of luck until the winter season ends and the spring season begins. I promise, though, it is worth the wait.

Cover Image Credit: Michelle Weinfurt

Popular Right Now

5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
265767
views

Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

13 Reasons Sophomore Year Is Much Worse Than Junior Year Of High School

And now you can happily throw all your misconceptions about junior year down the drain.

50
views

Maybe you're an eighth grader getting ready to start high school in a few months, or maybe you're a junior almost done with the supposedly "toughest year of high school." Or maybe you're smack-dab in the middle of sophomore year, overwhelmed by everything around you. Sounds familiar? You'll be happy to know that for the most part, too, that 11th grade has nothing on the horrors of 10th grade. So what makes them so starkly different in difficulty?

1. People still do not take you seriously.

You're still in the bottom half of the high school, and you're still a lot shorter than that senior walking past you in the hallway. People in the year above you still see you as the little freshman from before, and you're trying so desperately to prove that as a 10th grader, you're a lot wiser now. Keep in mind, though, that after an entire year of stress, stress and more stress, you'll be wishing to revert back to the first day of high school.

2. Certain classes start taking over your life.

For me? AP World History, easily the most difficult class I have ever taken throughout high school.

I am not a history buff, nor do I think I ever will be. And that's one of the biggest reasons why I just could not understand the content in the class. On top of that, it was my first class of the day, I'd have hours of work for the class to finish each night and I just couldn't find any interest. So why, pray tell, did I take the class? Because everyone else was.

Because I succumbed to the peer pressure surrounding taking AP World History, I found myself struggling to stay afloat. Every test was just another issue after the previous one, and I'd even feel like crying and not knowing what to do to get through the class. I bet there will be a class like that, no matter how interested you are in its content, and you will have those horrible days where you don't know how to get out.

3. You realize that freshman year was almost too easy.

Way, way too easy. I was having fun in freshman year, and that shouldn't even be happening when I'm supposed to be growing up into a high schooler. And that's mainly because freshman year is a transition year where no one expects too much out of you. It's like a buffer year in which you're on autopilot while observing how upperclassmen have to manage their own stress.

Sophomore year is when everything you've observed in ninth grade has to come into play, and you're suddenly thrown into a hurricane that won't stop until that very last school day. Sounds like fun.

4. People keep telling you that "junior year only gets worse than this."

Is that true? Nope.

Junior year is a lot less stressful than people make it out to be, and maybe that's because you're so used to the idea of it being an impossible year to conquer. Honestly, all I realized is that the key to a successful year is just choosing the right course load and toning down the out-of-school duties so I could balance out the two parts of my life. Junior year is not anywhere as bad as sophomore year, and that's a guarantee.

5. You feel like you've already lost a year of high school to impress colleges.

Graduation's coming sooner than you think.

Because freshman year comes off as so easy, I remember thinking that I did not take advantage of how lax my year was. Come sophomore year, I felt like I had to join another club, take another class, do another project. The work kept piling on because I thought in ninth grade that high school was always going to be so easy. In fact, sophomore year makes it the complete opposite.

But don't base your success on what you believe colleges will think of your every action. Look at your career holistically, and notice the trends you tend to take that have gotten you to where you are.

6. Other people start taking you seriously. Too seriously.

Remember a few points back when I said no one takes you seriously? There are the few special people who scrutinize absolutely everything you do and do their best to make you unnecessarily stressed about things you shouldn't be worrying about so young.

"Thought of your specific dream college that you want to attend the minute high school is over?"

"Know every single class you'll be taking in your second semester of senior year?"

Questions like these pop up out of the blue and from the same few suspects, and they're meant to scare you. Don't be spooked by these people; they either want what's best for you or are wasting their own time trying to make other people upset.

7. You begin to underestimate yourself and your capabilities.

When teachers keep expecting more from you as the year goes on and extracurricular activities are making you feel more and more on edge rather than de-stressed, you feel as if this isn't how you should be feeling. You think you're supposed to be on top of everything given to you because that's why you chose that certain rigor for your sophomore year. This happened with me last year when AP World History was becoming too much work, and there was this one week when I couldn't even leave my room because I thought I'd be losing too much time for my assignments.

8. Peer pressure makes you start questioning your good decisions.

Peer pressure gets the best of us.

Peer pressure and good decisions aren't supposed to mix, but they happen to make the perfect mixture of stress and worry. Especially when everyone boasts about the classes they're taking or the activities they're a part of, you feel so utterly compelled to throw yourself into the same pathway, even if you have no interest in what others are doing.

This always happens with me and others when course recommendations for the next year come out. When you're told to choose a whole new set of classes, you can't help but take a pointer or two from others who seem to know what they're doing.

SEE ALSO: No One Prepares You For The Peer Pressure That Forces You To Choose 'Better' Decisions

9. In some classes, you're forced to be with upperclassmen you don't know. 

This happened in a few of my classes, and it was so painful to be the one sophomore in a room full of juniors and seniors with a few sophomores sprinkled here and there. It's scary to be in a room where the people around you are taller than you and know a lot more about the world than you do. You feel like that one small fish in a big, big pond.

10. People start talking more about this thing called "class ranks."

You've definitely heard of it somehow and somewhere in your life. But people start taking the concept really, really seriously starting the end of sophomore year. You'll hear foreign whispers about it, almost as if it's a forbidden secret that you're not yet supposed to know about. And you'll eventually wish that you never heard about it when people starting comparing themselves based on such rankings.

SEE ALSO: My Graduating Class Is Competitive To A Worrying Extent, And It Drives Us Away From Each Other

11. Even before sophomore year begins, you don't know what classes to take.

An empty classroom.

When you take a cookie-cutter schedule from ninth grade and get asked to choose from a slew of new courses in 10th grade, you have to ask yourself what you want to get interested in. And on top of that, you might find so many classes you're genuinely intrigued by that you have to find the balance between fun classes and core classes. Sophomore year's independence can sometimes be burdensome.

12. You get put into way more group projects than before.

Of course, being a team player is an important aspect of being successful in the future, but in most group projects I've been a part of, no one works on the project at all until the night before the project is due. And when you're constantly thrown into groups of people you've never talked to and who won't work on the project until the night before, you get stressed way beyond what's considered normal.

13. Time starts flying really quickly, and that's not always a good thing.

Yeah, yeah, time flying quickly does mean the weekend will come sooner and that summer break is getting closer, but your long-term decision making begins in sophomore year. Surprisingly, a lot of your decisions about your future start playing themselves out in 10th grade itself, and you have to control time itself to make sure you don't forget anything as you rush through each day.

Related Content

Facebook Comments