8 Signs You're From Chanhassen, MN

8 Signs You're From Chanhassen, MN

Home of the Storm!
92
views

Chanhassen, Minnesota. A beautiful town, made up of about 24,500 people, located in the western part of the state. If you're from Chanhassen, or attended school there, you can probably relate to these eleven signs that you're from "Chanhappening."

1. You either attended Chanhassen High School, or know someone that has/does.

You know that although your mascot isn't that intimidating (I mean, c'mon... the Storm?), you'll always root for your team, whether it be in football, or in speech.

2. You've told everyone that visited that Prince's recording studio was based in Chanhassen.

And you know that rumor has it that when it's lit up in purple lights, Prince is home.

3. When you try to tell people where Chanhassen is, you automatically say "there's a dinner theatre there!"

If they don't know what the Chanhassen Dinner Theatre is, they won't know where Chanhassen is.

4. You live for the rivalry between Chanhassen and Chaska.

Even though we're in the same district, the rivalry is enormous, and Chaska vs. Chanhassen games are always packed.

5. You, or someone you know, has been featured in the local newspaper, the Chanhassen Villager.

A classic small town newspaper, it's as charming and informative about your neighbors as it can get.

6. You've been to the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, and just refer to it as "the Arboretum" now.

Your parents have probably dragged you here more than a few times to go on walks with them, and admire the foliage.

7. You've told people all about the local cult, Eckankar, and have shown them the golden pyramid located in the center of Chanhassen.

"Did you know that they think that Chanhassen is the center of the universe?"

8. Even though it's hard to live in suburban Chanhassen sometimes, it's your home.

And you love it.

Cover Image Credit: http://www.qualitygreenllc.com/images/chanhassen_map.jpg

Popular Right Now

50 One-Liners College Girls Swap With Their Roomies As Much As They Swap Clothes

"What would I do without you guys???"
104166
views

1. "Can I wear your shirt out tonight?"

2. "Does my hair look greasy?"

3. "We should probably clean tomorrow..."

4. "What should I caption this??"

5. "Is it bad if I text ____ first??"

6. "Should we order pizza?"

7. *Roommate tells an entire story* "Wait, what?"

8. "How is it already 3 AM?"

9. "I need a drink."

10. "McDonalds? McDonalds."

11. "GUESS WHAT JUST HAPPENED."

12. "Okay like, for real, I need to study."

13. "Why is there so much hair on our floor?"

14. "I think I'm broke."

15. "What do I respond to this?"

16. "Let's have a movie night."

17. "Why are we so weird?"

18. "Do you think people will notice if I wear this 2 days in a row?"

19. "That guy is so stupid."

20. "Do I look fat in this?"

21. "Can I borrow your phone charger?

22. "Wanna go to the lib tonight?"

23. "OK, we really need to go to the gym soon."

24. "I kinda want some taco bell."

25. "Let's go out tonight."

26. "I wonder what other people on this floor think of us."

27. "Let's go to the mall."

28. "Can I use your straightener?"

29. "I need coffee."

30. "I'm bored, come back to the room."

31. "Should we go home this weekend?"

32. "We should probably do laundry soon."

33. "Can you see through these pants?"

34. "Sometimes I feel like our room is a frat house..."

35. "Guys I swear I don't like him anymore."

36."Can I borrow a pencil?"

37. "I need to get my life together...."

38. "So who's buying the Uber tonight?"

39. "Let's walk to class together."

40. "Are we really pulling an all-nighter tonight?"

41. "Who's taking out the trash?"

42. "What happened last night?"

43. "Can you help me do my hair?"

44. "What should I wear tonight?"

45. "You're not allowed to talk to him tonight."

46. "OMG, my phone is at 1 percent."

47. "Should we skip class?"

48. "What should we be for Halloween?"

49. "I love our room."

50. "What would I do without you guys???"

Cover Image Credit: Hannah Gabaldon

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

To Every National Suicide Hotline Operator: Thank You

To every National Suicide Hotline Operator volunteer who has spent countless hours just listening to the vulnerable souls on the other end of the phone, I thank you.

1573
views

"Talk."

I'll never forget the first word I heard from that first call I made to the National Suicide Hotline all those years ago.

"Talk," said Gary, the hotline operator that I ended up talking to for four hours straight in the middle of the night.

I opened my mouth, but choked back more tears as I struggled to find the words. I cried and I cried at the one word Gary the hotline operator said to me.

Talk. That's the one thing that I hadn't done up until that low point in my life.

Talking was such a foreign concept for me after my mother died from cancer. I was 14 years of age back then. I'm an adult now (if you can even classify 20 years of age as "adult" nowadays), but looking back, I wish I could've opened up more before I called that hotline. But… it was just so hard to.

After my mother died, I moved to a new town, new state, and new region of the country. I was the new kid in town, starting as a freshman in high school. As a quiet new kid with no friends, I was practically destined to be labeled as a loner in school. And honestly, I was.

I'd enviously look at the other tables in the cafeteria and library where kids my age would converse with one another, carefree about real problems in the world. How could I be brave and talk to them when I was a new kid? How could I talk and relate to them when I had witnessed my mom suffering from cancer just a few short months prior? How could I relate to anyone who hadn't had experienced the major life changes that I was experiencing at the time?

The truth of the matter is this: No one should have to suffer from the pain of loss. No one should especially have to suffer from the indescribable pain of witnessing the death of someone who they loved and lost.

But I did.

Which is why I felt that I had to keep quiet. Which is why I sat alone at the lunch room tables. Which is why I kept to myself for a full year and a half after my mother died.

That is, until I reached my breaking point.

I nearly almost ended my life when I was a sophomore in high school. I remember the exact date and roughly the same time too that I almost did it. Almost.

It took me a while to reach my breaking point. It was gradual, by no way immediate should I add. But I reached it. To this day, I still can't believe that I almost did. Again, almost.

If it wasn't for Gary, I would've died the night I called the hotline. If it wasn't for Amy, another hotline operator I talked to for hours and hours a few years after I talked to Gary, I would've died back then too. If it wasn't for that one person on that hotline who listened while I talked, there's no way I'd be writing this right now.

I've experienced life in ways that the high school freshman-and-sophomore me wouldn't have dreamed of since those fateful phone calls.

I graduated from high school, which is an achievement that nowadays may seem to be "expected", but for me it meant a lot because my mother didn't get the chance to walk at graduation since she had me when she was a teenager. I decided to go to community college right after high school and recently graduated Summa Cum Laude with an Associate of Arts. And two weeks before I walked the stage at my community college graduation, I found out that I got accepted to my dream college with a full tuition scholarship…

My point is this: There's no way in hell I would've been able to experience life like this without someone who listened.

To every National Suicide Hotline Operator volunteer who has spent countless hours just listening to the vulnerable souls on the other end of the phone, I thank you. Thank you for doing what you do, thank you for putting in the time and giving people like me - someone who has experienced tremendous life changing episodes in life - a chance to talk.

It's not easy to talk, but you are the ones who listen. Thank you.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you or someone you know who is in need of someone to talk to, call the National Suicide Hotline via 1-800-273-8255.
Cover Image Credit:

https://pixabay.com/en/phone-call-telephone-handset-dial-3179343/

Related Content

Facebook Comments