7 Reasons I Chose Syracuse University

7 Reasons I Chose Syracuse University

I knew that I was always meant to bleed Orange and Blue.
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The college process is scary and exciting all at once.

Choosing a school that is right for you is a major decision that requires a lot of thinking about and researching. When I was a high school student, everybody knew that my dream was Syracuse University.

All of my college sweatshirts and pajamas were strictly Syracuse themed. Everybody always asks me why I chose Syracuse, especially when I live in Boca Raton, FL so I decided to answer the long, drawn out question.

1. The School Spirit

Syracuse is known for its school spirit and engaging sports.

I always wanted a school that dressed up for games and cheered on their school. Coming together as a family always puts a huge smile on my face, especially when we win a game. Even if we don't win a game, I still have the most amazing time tailgating with my friends dressed from head to toe in Orange and Blue.

Although other schools may have similar school spirit "levels," no one else has a massive dome on their campus!

2. A Family Who Bleeds Orange and Blue

My father attended this university back in 1986. Then, my older cousin, Ilyssa, came through and once I visited her, I knew this school was for me.

After Ilyssa graduated, my other cousin, Sam, joined the crew and then it was finally my turn! Although no one pressured me to choose or attend this school, I always knew it was the one for me and that I could find myself at home here.

Everybody says once you visit a school you will get "the feeling" that you are at the right school. I applied to multiple schools, however, none of them compared to the love and passion I felt for Syracuse University.

3. The Location

Although Syracuse is very far up North and the weather can be crazy, I love the fact that it is only a bus ride away from NYC and other nearby states. I always knew I wanted to go out of state for college, and having family up north makes it much easier when they are so close to me.

Other schools are similar to Syracuse with the big sports teams, however, they are not in states that provide easy transportation to hometowns such as New York or New Jersey.

Even though I am not in my home state of Florida, I know that I am always a few hours away from my family up north, which is very comforting.

4. The Size

Syracuse could be considered a big school to some, however, the students tend to disagree. Everywhere on campus is walking distance which is very convenient.

If you ask the students on campus, most will say that once you find your friends, your club, or whatever you get involved with on campus, the school becomes much smaller. I was not someone who wanted a small school, but I didn't necessarily want a massive school either. That is why I think Syracuse was the perfect fit for me.

5. The Mascot

Even though our mascot is a silly fruit, everyone who attends Syracuse knows ho Otto the Orange is important to our school. He is constantly running around campus and taking pictures with students. When I came here with my family as a high school student taking my tour, Otto was running around and music by the bookstore was playing and as I previously stated, I just knew I was home.

6. The Variety of Classes Available

Syracuse has so many different options for majors and minors that it ultimately makes it hard to make a decision on one path that you want to study.

For instance, Syracuse is home to the Newhouse School for Communications and offers classes that focus on Buzzfeed, Twitter, and much more that may be very interesting for some. Syracuse will make sure that you are on the path you need to be and enjoying yourself every step of the way.

7. The Perfect Balance of Academics and Social life

Everybody always says that college is the best four years of your life because you are constantly partying.

Although we want to think that is true, that is certainly not the case. I knew I was never a Harvard student that was 100% dedicated to my school work, but I also knew that I preferred a little challenge over no challenge at all. Syracuse offers the perfect balance of academics and social life because in order play hard you must work hard as well.

It may seem that I am a little obsessed with Syracuse, which is very true. I was always obsessed with this school, and alwyas knew this was going to be the school for me. Hopefully, everybody feels as poassionately for their school as I do because there is nothing better than looking forward to waking up and walking through campus knowing that all of that hard work in high school, finally payed off.

Cover Image Credit: Syracuse University

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If You Really Want To Lessen The Divide Between Arts And Athletics, Funding Will Be Equalized

It's right in front of us and has been going unnoticed.

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No matter how old you are, you probably identify at least a little with either the arts or athletics. Growing up, most of us were either the 'cool' kids who typically played some type of sport or the not-so-cool kids that were interested in the arts. A simple question would be, why can't someone be both? Well, it's possible, but do the in-betweeners ever feel completely at home in one setting? This is an issue that tends to extend to college, and a point was brought up to me not long ago regarding the social gap between athletes and other students. In order to eradicate this issue, we must first understand where it stems from.

All in all, it seems to me that the divide begins in schools. Schools are the first places where children are beginning to be socialized, so the most impact tends to be made there. If schools are teaching children to look up to older high school athletes, as most do, it is almost certain that most children will aspire to be a part of that culture when they get to high school. Sure, some students will want to join the arts because they notice an affinity towards them, but some might still look the other way because of what they have been taught to admire.

Once in high school, perhaps even more impact is made. Students are discovering who they are and what their place in the world around them is. The way that their high school treats them means everything because that's typically their world for four long years.

From what I gather, the majority of high schools put athletes on a pedestal, letting them get away with more than others, as well as rewarding them more than others.

There are several problems with this, the first being that other students are placed in the background. Students who take part in the arts in school are often held to a typical standard, where they must follow all of the rules with little leniency and are not as recognized for their achievements as the athletes. However this does not only negatively affect students in the arts, but athletes as well. It might seem a little odd to claim that they are negatively affected while given all the privileges, but it is true to a certain extent.

For example, these athletes will not be adequately prepared for life after high school. After years of being told how wonderful they are and being exempt from average rules of behavior, these students are likely to graduate high school and be shocked at how they are expected to act and how people no longer hand them special privileges.

Both students involved in the arts and athletics are hurt here as well because they are all missing out on the crucial socialization of one group with another that may have different interests.

It is so important that these groups meet so that they are able to network with others who maybe aren't exactly like them. There is also always the possibility that students will find new interests that they did not even know they had by speaking to others outside of their groups.

This divide is also perpetuated by the tendency of school districts of all types to overfund athletics and underfund the arts. While the funding of the school may seem like a thing that wouldn't really affect the social lives of students, it creates a socioeconomic divide of sorts between groups. The arts tend to feel smaller and recognize the divide easily in funding since they face the hardships of it.

If funding was appropriately allocated between programs, this monetary divide could be quickly solved. Perhaps in the absence of the socioeconomic divide, tackling the more social aspect might be easier.

It is so important to address the situation early in elementary, middle, and high schools because it may carry on to university. At the university level, it may be easier to eradicate the divide since most students seem to be on the same page. However, it can still seem intimidating to approach someone of a social group that you have been conditioned to feel uncomfortable around. The divide is unfair for both parties, and the most a student can really do is to step out of their comfort zone and start a conversation with someone they don't know. It starts with the individual, so be kind to others and remember that there is growth in discomfort.

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