53 Things To Do To Keep You Busy This Summer

53 Things To Do To Keep You Busy This Summer

Let's make this summer count!
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So here we are. We're in the final stretch before summer break, and that means anywhere between three to four months of time away from campus. Time isn't necessarily money, but as broke college students who are looking to plump up our resumes or CVs and make money as we plan for the future, job-hunting has taken up a large part of our time before prepping for finals.

Let's face it, we've all applied to two-dozen or more internships, and with a lack of leads, perhaps you're swimming through the general work-application pool in your town. But you have no leads. Your friends have summer camp-counselor jobs lined up, or are moving miles upon miles away from their homes for some dream-internship or fellowship, and you're in a rut. I wait endlessly to hear back from prospective internships, uncertain of how many people applied, and if I'll ever even get a confirmation email that they've looked at my materials.

But this doesn't mean your summer is worthless. It doesn't mean you're a failure, or you don't have a future. The job market is hard to crack even if you have connections, and there are people much older than us who are still looking for that sweet spot to solidify their most-perfect future.

There are dozens of things to do with your summer, especially things that can help amp up your resume, and that will make you feel like a more fulfilled person. Here are 53 things you can do to make your summer spectacular.

Get to Work

Let's be real, finding way to spruce up your resume is always handy. I like to be busy, and finding 9-to-5 work is an ideal way for me keep busy. There are so many ways to do so, and so many opportunities to continue seeking out, and this can always be a side project as you continue to have a fulfilling summer, as there are always people out there looking for worker bees.

1. Spruce up your Linkedin.

2. Keep looking for internships throughout the summer.

3. Get a job.

4. Do odd jobs.

5. Volunteer.

6. Carefully peruse Craigslist for opportunities.

7. Apply for a research position.


Let’s Get Creative

Keep your creative spirit alive is a crucial part to being a growing adult. It's a great way to meet new people, great skills to cultivate and a wonderful way to express yourself. Also, many of the skills below could be great for our CVs!

8. Pick up, or go back to, an instrument.

9. Learn to draw.

10. Take an art class.

11. Learn Photoshop.

12. Learn to edit videos.

13. Learn photography.

14. Have a photoshoot.

15. DIY it all.

16. Maintain a Pinterest board or Tumblr.

17. Visit a free museum.


Learn a Little

I feel relatively stagnant when I'm not learning. Last summer I boosted my skill set by taking a photography class, and it taught me not only how to use my DSLR, but also how to use photoshop to its fullest extent. Learning HTML or Spanish are relatively crucial to the current, technology and social-based job world, and it'll just help give us a one-up in the market.

18. Take a college class at a local college.

19. Learn a programming language.

20. Learn a new topic that's completely unrelated to your field of study.

21. Practice a language to become fluent in it.

22. Learn a new language.

23. Learn about a culture or practice.


Keep Moving

I love working out, and am completely nervous about gym fees! While college gym access comes with being on a campus, many gyms are so pricey back home. Nevertheless, finding ways to keep fit and stay active are important for physical and mental wellness, and are a good practice to keep.

24. Generate a workout regimen.

25. Join an exercise class (bonus points if it's free).

26. Learn to do a handstand.

27. Learn to do a cartwheel.

28. Work toward becoming more flexible.

29. Take a walk every day.

30. Take a self defense class.


Live Your Future Life

Whilst us being legally adults at 18, sometimes it doesn't feel like I'm truly an adult yet. I still live at home, and rely on my parents, particularly while I'm home on vacations and breaks. Becoming more self-sufficient is an integral part of growing up, and these skills are important for survival as we age.

31. Learn to cook.

32. Get your permit or your license.

33. Make a budget.

34. Develop an online presence.

35. Challenge your fears.

36. Learn to live fully and inexpensively.


Be Social

Hiding behind our computers when it's so beautiful out is such a shame! The summer is an ideal time to meet people beyond your circle, and also getting to spend time with friends who've become distanced, or without the chains of class scheduling. Social activities can also lead to knew hobbies or skill-building, so there's no losing here.

37. Get to know your neighbors.

38. Spend time with friends.

39. Meet new friends.

40. Spend quality time with your parents.

41. Find a new group through Meetup.com.

42. Begin a club.

43. Join a LARP or an RPG group.


Good Practices

This is definitely a broad, miscellaneous mini-list, but these are the types of things that will really make your summer fulfilling, and initiate good practices for the future. Do things that are meditative, positively-time consuming, and helpful to those around you.

44. Cook once a week for your parents.

45. Keep a journal.

46. Clean your room - really.

47. Help or initiate an intense summer cleaning

48. Start a garden.

49. Sell or trade books you're no longer interested in.

50. Catch up on reading -- or, make a summer goal for words/pages/books read!

51. Learn about your city.

52. Clean up your e-Life.


And Most Importantly

53. Have fun.


Cover Image Credit: Greco Antonella

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Saying Goodbye To Freshman Year

"High School goes by fast, but college goes by even faster."
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“High School goes by fast, but college goes by even faster”, we’ve all heard it and probably all ignored it as well. I mean time is time. It moves at the same pace no matter what you’re doing right?

Nope.

High School is over, I’m now a freshman in college and it’s April. I’m sitting here in my dorm looking at all my clothes, and bins thinking, how in the hell will this all fit in my car again? It is crazy, I need to be thinking about all of this now because there is one month of my freshman year left, just one.

All I can keep thinking is how? Wasn’t it just last week that I moved into my cozy room at the end of the hall, or just yesterday that I ran home to two hundred beautiful new sisters? As much as it seems like yesterday, it wasn’t.

It was almost eight months ago that I stepped onto this campus as a freshman, now it is my last four weeks and they are jam-packed. From formal to finals I am in the home stretch of my first year of college. I just registered for my classes next semester, and can’t get it through my head that I will soon be a sophomore.

While walking around campus I still catch myself thinking, wow I am really here. I am a college student, at a school, I fall more in love with every day. So, how can I be a sophomore now when I feel like I just got here?

Yes, I still have three amazing years of college ahead of me, and I can’t wait to see what those years have in store in for me. But, I just can’t help but feel a little sad that I won’t be a freshman anymore. I won’t be the youngest in my sorority family, I won’t be coming back to a dorm every night.

Now don’t get me wrong, I am stoked to live in an apartment next year with my absolute best friends. And you definitely could have heard me saying “I am so over this whole dorm thing” once or twice this semester, but now I can’t help but see all the things I’ll miss.

Freshman year is just unique. You get this giant clean slate, a fresh start. And it is just waiting to see what you’ll do with it. It truly is a year of firsts. My first failure, the first time being on my own, my first time not knowing anyone in my classes. Yes, that can all be a lot to take on, I was terrified at the start of the school year. But before I knew it, I had a routine, I had friends, I had a life here.

And this life surpassed all my expectations. I have a home away from home. I have friends that I know will be my bridesmaids some day. I have experiences that I’ll never forget.

Now as I head back home for the summer I couldn’t be more excited to be with my friends there and my family. But, I also couldn’t be sadder to leave my friends here, even if it’s only for three months because they’ve become another kind of family.

Despite leaving freshman year behind, we have so many more memories to make whether it’s doing the Seminole chop in Doak, coordinating our Halloween costumes, or just chilling at the house. We’ve all come so far this year, and I can’t wait to see just how far we go. So bring it on Sophomore year, I’m ready for ya.

Cover Image Credit: Cameron Kira

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Get Off Your High Horse, You Need To Practice

You cannot get better if you sit on your butt wishing you were better.

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Since playing an instrument since the sixth grade, and singing since I can remember, I never really actively practiced and it showed. Sure, I had a fun time and thought I was pretty decent, but I never really improved after high school ended. At least, not by a whole lot. I played scales, okay, but I never was really confident in knowing them by heart.

My tone was atrocious, I didn't know what to do to get better. I thought I was too good to practice, although, some things were too easy for me to practice at the time. Still, I could have practiced something. I literally didn't get myself anywhere by thinking I was good.

Playing/singing music in college is so much different than playing/singing in high school. The pieces are hard, the amount of energy it takes to get through one piece is so much sometimes, and it can get mentally exhausting.

And without practicing, it felt impossible to play. In my voice lessons, I was not improving and I could not figure out why. I didn't think I needed to practice. Only people who need extra work needed practice.

That is honestly what I had thought for years. I now realize how ridiculous that is and how immature I was then as a person and as a musician.

But I learned that it's good to practice! Practicing is good and it helps so much. Keep running that through your mind. Don't forget it. Start a practicing schedule! Even just thirty minutes, you'll be surprised at the outcome!

Five hours a week is a great start, but start slow and don't overload yourself. And start early. Don't wait until college to start! Tackle it head on and watch yourself become a better musician.

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