Species become extinct or endangered each and every day. Once a species is gone, it is gone for good, and there is no way to bring it back. 40 percent of the world's species are at risk of extinction. Groups and organizations, such as the World Wildlife Foundation, have been created in an attempt to save endangered species. In spite of conservative efforts made by these organizations, extinction will still be a problem that many species are at risk of.

1. The Anglerfish

Anglerfish are the scary looking fish in Finding Nemo with the glowing light attached to its head. Female anglerfish are much larger than males. In fact, male anglerfish are 1/20th the size of female anglerfish. Male anglerfish are so small that they attach themselves to the female by burrowing their teeth into the female. When this happens, the male angler fish appears to be nothing more than a small blob attached to his female counterpart. After burying himself into the female, the male anglerfish eventually loses his eyeballs, internal organs, and then life.

2. The Kiwi

The Kiwi is a flightless bird. Since the Kiwi cannot fly, the bird is violent and temperamental. In addition to violent nature, the Kiwi also has a powerful sense of smell. The Kiwi uses its strong smell to sniff out food and predators.

3. The Olm

The Olm is a blind amphibian. The Olm usually lives for about 100 years, and it can go 10 years without food. The Olm has gills and spends its entire life living in the water. The Olm's humanlike skin give it the nickname "human fish".

4. The Purple Frog

The Purple Frog is named appropriately for its stunning color. The Purple Frog spends most of the year living 13 feet below ground only coming out to mate during monsoon season. The Purple Frog only spends about two weeks above ground when they come up for air and to mate. Scientist were skeptical that the Purple Frog existed at first because they spend so much time underground and are rarely seen. The Purple Frog is also called Pig Nose because of its snubbed nose.

5. The Dugong

The Dugong is similar to a manatee and closely related to the elephant. The Dugong has a split tail, similar to that of a whale. It is thought that ancient myths about mermaids were inspired by the Dugong. Poachers hunt the Dugong for its meat, oil, skin and bones, causing it to be extremely endangered.