40 Things To Do When You Have Nothing To Do

40 Things To Do When You Have Nothing To Do

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Sometimes you find yourself with all of the time in the world, but no idea how to spend it. You swear to yourself that just yesterday you had infinite ideas about what to do in your free time, but right now, they're just slipping your mind. Well, fear no more. Below is a list of 40 things to do in your spare time that will have you wondering where all of the time went.

1. Try to cook/bake something new.

Browse Pinterest and try out a new recipe!

2. Listen to NPR.

Tune into NPR's live stream- one of the best ways to brush up on current events.

3. Write a letter to a family member or friend.

Receiving a letter in the mail is one of the best feelings ever. Make someone feel warm and fuzzy inside!

4. Go through your clothes and get rid of what you don't wear anymore.

Sometimes you will really find yourself surprised by how much of your clothing you don't wear; you can either donate it or sell it for a reasonable price if you could use some extra money!

5. Watch BuzzFeed food videos on YouTube.

Here's a good one to get you started:

6. Clean your room.

Come on, this never hurts.

7. Color an adult coloring page.

Here are some free ones to print out.

8. Look for a DIY project to try on Pinterest.

The possibilities are endless with an untouched Mason jar.

9. Look for new music to listen to.

Nothing beats the feeling of finding a new go-to artist.

10. Schedule your month.

Why not get ahead?

11. Go for a walk.

Getting some fresh air often goes under appreciated.

12. Read a new book.

A good book and a cup of tea: a match made in heaven.

13. Call someone that you haven't spoken to in a while.

Hearing the voice of someone you haven't spoken to in a while is something you can't pass up.

14. Start making a photo album.

There are Facebook photo albums and there are real photo albums- you'll want the latter in the future.

15. Learn more about something you've always wanted to know more about.

There's always been that one thing that you've regretted not knowing enough about; take some time and do some research on it!

16. Visit a museum.

Many cities and schools have free museum access; make an effort to appreciate these attractions!

17. Paint your nails.

Never fails!

18. Have a movie marathon.

Watch some movies you've never seen before!

19. Pick an actor/actress and watch as many of their films as you can.

It's super interesting to see how actors and actresses take on different roles.

20. Explore the city nearest to you.

Even if you've lived in the same place for your entire life, there's probably a site you've never seen -- go find it!

21. Paint a picture.

Even if you don't consider yourself to be talented with paint and a brush, painting is a very relaxing way to spend your time.

22. Go through your closet and come up with new outfit ideas.

Maybe you'll realize that that one top in the back of your closet actually goes well with your favorite pair of jeans!

23. Watch Jimmy Kimmel's "Celebrity Mean Tweets" videos on YouTube.

24. Write about your week.

Reflect on the highs and the lows. Save it to look back on one day.

25. Start a blog.

It's a challenging thing to start, but it's a very self defining activity.

26. Watch makeup tutorials and try out a new look.

Browse through Youtube to find a makeup tutorial that you find compatible with yourself; test out whatever you find!

27. Go to the gym.

If you have the time, why not? Once you get up and go, you'll feel great about it!

28. Challenge yourself to a sudoko.

Check out WebSudoku.com.

29. Create a new playlist.

For the gym, for studying, for relaxation- you pick!

30. Go to a busy area and people watch (with your favorite sunglasses so you don't look creepy).

So what's that person's story?

31. Make a bucket list.

Make a list of things you'd like to accomplish before you're 50.

32. Search the web to find clothing deals and coupons.

Channel your inner "extreme couponer."

33. Use those deals to go shopping.

Shopping without shopper's remorse!

34. Try to learn a different way to style your hair.

If you've never learned how to french braid, now is your time!

35. Do a step-by-step drawing.

Check out the Art Made Easy website.

36. Rearrange your furniture.

Sometimes change is good.

37. Go on a hike.

Pack a lunch and go exploring!

38. Take pictures at a scenic area.

You don't need a Canon camera to be a photographer for the day. All you need is your smartphone and a great view.

39. Watch Tastemade Tiny Kitchen videos on YouTube.

It's the little things.

40. Watch a Netflix documentary.

Netflix has some of the best documentaries out there. Instead of binge watching your regular show, expand your horizons!


Cover Image Credit: Mercola

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What Your Hogwarts House Says About You

Get yourself sorted and find out where you belong in the world of witchcraft and wizardry.
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Sorting at Hogwarts is a big deal. Being sorted into a house is essentially being placed into a family while you are away from home learning about witchcraft and wizardry. Your house is made up of the people you will live with, go to classes with, play Quidditch with and everything in between. You basically spend 24/7 with them. Your Hogwarts house is your home away from home.

When you get sorted into a house, it is based on your personality traits. The people in your house are typically like-minded people who display the same characteristics as you.

When you’re a first year at Hogwarts, the minute you set foot in the castle you are swept into the Great Hall to have the ancient Sorting Hat placed on your head. This Sorting Hat decides which “family” you’ll be spending your seven years with.

For some, it is very obvious which house they will be in, due to certain personality traits they possess. For others, they may exemplify traits that fit a multitude of houses and are uncertain where they may end up.

To find out where you belong, you can take the official "Harry Potter" Sorting Hat quiz at Pottermore.com. For all you muggles out there, these are the characteristics that the houses possess and what your house says about you:

Gryffindor: The house of the brave, loyal, courageous, adventurous, daring and chivalrous. Those who stand up for others are typically Gryffindors. Brave-hearted is the most well-known Gryffindor characteristic, and Gryffindors are also known for having a lot of nerve.

Gryffindors are people who hold a multitude of qualities alongside the ones listed, making them a very well-rounded house. People who are Gryffindors are often people who could fit nicely into another house but choose to tell the sorting hat they want Gryffindor (there's that bravery). "Do what is right" is the motto Gryffindors go by.

Being a Gryffindor means that you're probably the adventurous and courageous friend, and you are usually known for doing what is right.

Ravenclaw: The house is known for their wisdom, intelligence, creativity, cleverness and knowledge. Those who value brains over brawn can be found here. Ravenclaws often tend to be quite quirky as well. "Do what is wise" is the motto they strive to follow.

Though Ravenclaws can be know-it-alls sometimes, they most likely do know what the wisest decision is.

If you are known for being the quirky friend, the smartest in the group or just great at making wise decisions, you're definitely a Ravenclaw.

Hufflepuff: This house values hard work, dedication, fair play, patience, and loyalty. Hufflepuff’s are known for being just and true. "Do what is nice" is their motto.

Hufflepuff is known as the “nice house” and believes strongly in sparing peoples feelings and being kind. This is not to say that Hufflepuffs aren't smart or courageous. Hufflepuffs just enjoy making others happy and tend to be more patient towards people.

If you ever find that you are too nice for your own good and cannot bear to hurt someone’s feelings, congratulations, you are a Hufflepuff.

Slytherin: This is the house of the cunning, prideful, resourceful, ambitious, intelligent, and determined. Slytherin's love to be in charge and crave leadership. "Do what is necessary" is the motto of this house.

Slytherin is a fairly well-rounded house, similar to the other houses. They are loyal to those that are loyal to them just as Gryffindors are and are intelligent as Ravenclaws.

Slytherin house as a whole is not evil, despite how many dark wizards come out of this house. That is merely based on the choices of those wizards (so if your friend is a Slytherin, don’t judge, it doesn’t mean they are mean people). Slytherins do, however, have a tendency to be arrogant or prideful. This is most likely due to the fact that everyone in Slytherin is exceedingly proud to be there.

What Hogwarts house you’re in says a lot about the person you are, the traits you possess and how you may act in some situations. But in the end, your house is really just your home that is always there for you. Always.


Cover Image Credit: Warner Bros Pictures

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Why We Should Re-Watch Our Favorite TV Shows

The next time you get criticized for starting your favorite TV show again , ignore it - because most of the time, it's the best thing you can do.

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I have said this thousands of times, and I will say it again: "The Wire" is the best show of all time and God's gift to the Earth. I've written not one, not two, not three, but four articles about various reasons why "The Wire" is the best show of all time, and am currently on my fourth run through the show. I am legitimately not myself on a given day if I don't have my daily dose of something related to "The Wire."

But I digress - this isn't an article about "The Wire,' but rather the latter phenomenon of why we love to re-watch our favorite TV shows all the time. Many of my friends watch "The Office," "Friends," and "Grey's Anatomy" over and over again, dozens of times. Why do we do this, when we know exactly what will happen every time? In the words of The Atlantic's Derek Thompson: "Why do we spend so much time with stories whose endings we already know?"

Well, one of the answers is pretty obvious: because a show is just that good. Why waste your time watching a show your friend is raving about that you might get into, when there's a show you've seen before that you know you'll get into? It saves our time and we get the most efficient investment, knowing with absolute certainty that we will enjoy it.

Does watching a show over and over again make it lose its spark? You may be asking this question to a repeat watcher such as myself - and my answer is a definitive no. Thompson perhaps frames this more eloquently in stating that "familiar fare requires less mental energy to process, and when something is easy to think about, we consider it good." In psychology, the mere exposure effect says that the more we're exposed to something, the more we'll like it.

But, of course, it goes deeper than that. Watching shows again brings back nostalgia back to our lives, and allows us to remember the past. The root of the word nostalgia is the combination of two Greek words nostos , which means homecoming, and algos , which means pain. Initially, when the term was invented in the 17th century, it was seen as a disease - one theory believed that Swiss mercenaries were depressed because they were impaired by homesickness.

Clay Routledge, a psychologist at North Dakota State University, declares that there are two forms of nostalgia - historical and autobiographical. It is the latter that we often find when we re-watch TV shows - "a nostalgia for [our] individual past." Watching shows we liked as kids and teenagers can make us feel young again. Routledge also found that his subjects exposed to popular songs when from their youth thought had more feelings that "life is worth living."

Routledge's studies, which validate our very own experiences, are direct evidence that re-watching TV shows is therapeutic. Nostalgia is, at its most basic form, deeply relaxing. Remembering the past, where we can re-tell and recall episodes of our lives with complete certainty is clearly much easier than the present of living our lives, where we constantly stumble into the terrifying unknown. Old TV shows "can't surprise us. We know how they end, and we know how we'll feel when they end. This makes the re-consumption of entertainment a bit like 'emotional regulation.'" As much as any of us are prepared to handle surprises, the fact is that most of the time, they're not exactly easy to deal with.

Lastly, although the plot of our favorite old TV shows is always the same, how we watch and how we interpret never are. Every time I watch through "The Wire" is a different, unique experiment - the first time, it was for the plot, the second time, it was about the societal implications, and the third time, it was about how to treat people on an everyday basis. Thompson shares a similar experience in re-hearing his favorite song, Jeff Buckley's rendition of "Hallelujah": "Replaying his music nine years later was like opening a time capsule and watching its treasures react to fresh oxygen."

Re-watching is an act of more than just "mere nostalgia or therapy. It's pop culture as palimpsest - an old memory, overlaid with new perspective."

Watching "The Wire" for the fourth time, it's in the context of just getting the job that the show drove me to apply to and be passionate for. Starting next year, I will be a teacher. A lot of things have happened in my life since my third run. It's not the same process of watching by any stretch - every scene I have already seen three times, I see it a different way. I learn something new - not only about the show, but about myself.

The next time you get criticized for starting your favorite TV show again , ignore it - because most of the time, it's the best thing you can do.

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