3 Christmas Movie Conspiracy Theories To Make You Question Your "Holiday Spirit"

3 Christmas Movie Conspiracy Theories To Make You Question Your "Holiday Spirit"

Some people really go out of the way for an interesting theory, just wait for the honorable mention.

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Christmas is almost here, and we are here for it. With every movie that's ever released however, someone has to twist a most likely harmless idea into some newer, darker meaning. Out of my own curiosity, sometimes you just need to delve into the rabbit hole of the internet and see what you can find. Some might make a small amount of sense, others are completely outrageous, either way, you can have some fun and decide for yourself, but here are three older films that have pretty popular fan-guided conspiracy theories.

1. The elves planned Santa's death.

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In Disney's "The Santa Clause" (1994), Tim Allen plays Scott Calvin, a divorced father who has his son for Christmas. This Christmas Eve however, doesn't go exactly as expected. They are awakened in the middle of the night by the sound of someone walking on their roof (SHOCKER!). Scott then ventures outside and shouts up to the red-suited figure standing at his chimney and is even more surprised when the figure falls. Upon attempting to check for this man's identification we discover a greeting card that says "Santa Claus. If something should happen to me, put on my suit, the Reindeer will know what to do" and afterwards the physical body within the suit vanishes.

After some coercing and adventure, we finally get to see the North Pole that Scott now delivers for. After arriving, Mr. Calvin is obviously concerned and confused as to why he is here and what he's supposed to be doing now. He's shown around for the night and is returned to his bed sometime before waking up the next morning like nothing happened, aside for his new pajamas.

Throughout this entire sequence of events though, the elves don't seem to be fazed in the slightest by the new Santa's arrival. They even spend a scene in the movie talking about the older Santa and that now the children and the world are happier having this new Santa. This, along with the original card found, and the (mostly) safe assumption that Santa Claus doesn't die and become replaced every year, can only really be interpreted that the elves were already expecting the death of their Santa. And much like Hamlet and Scar from "The Lion King," how can you especially anticipate the death of a leader? By planning it.

(There is also a theory surrounding the possibility that Bernard, the head elf, may be the dead Santa's son.)

2. The hobo in "The Polar Express" died on the train.

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In "The Polar Express," we meet a hobo atop the train. This hobo calls himself the "King of the North Pole," but claims to not believe in Santa or Christmas. He does however ask Hero Boy if he believes in ghosts, and when the hobo receives an answer of "no," all he has to say is "interesting." Obviously, we are not dealing with just a man, or lack thereof, though because he can clearly manage to disappear and reappear in the snow and appear alternatively in certain scenes in order to provide assistance throughout the film.

How did this hobo die though? If you pay some close attention to the conductor, he'll tell you that on his first ride on the train he was saved from falling off by someone unknown. Along with this, the DVD "extra song" shows the engineers telling the kids that the hobo was sitting on the top of the train when he collided with the top of Flatop and was killed. Ouch!

3. Frosty is actually a poltergeist. 

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Everyone knows the story behind Frosty the Snowman. A group of children made a snowman one day "with a corncob pipe and a button nose and his eyes made out of coal," it says. It also mentions that the weather is warm, so we can assume that winter is ending. This theory focuses on where these kids obtained their coal. Did they get coal for Christmas because they were bad kids? The song does mention that the hat was found and that that was the reason for Frosty's life, but where did the hat come from other than the evil magician? All potential magic can have a dark side and that dark side is what this theory relies on. Not much else is said about it other than this life force within the snowman could potentially be there to ruin/steal lives. I mean, he did encourage children to run away to the North Pole with him after all.

Honorable Mention

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"The land of Whoville in 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas' is a post-apocalyptic land set in an alternate timeline where Hitler won WWII."

Yes, I seriously found this. No, I have no explanation.

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11 Things Psychology Majors Hear That Drive Them Crazy

No pun intended.
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We've all been there. You're talking to a new acquaintance, or a friend of your parents, or whoever. And then, you get the dreaded question.

"So what are you studying in school?"

Cue the instant regret of picking Psychology as your major, solely for the fact that you are 99.9% likely to receive one of the slightly comical, slightly cliche, slightly annoying phrases listed below. Don't worry though, I've included some responses for you to use next time this comes up in conversation. Because it will.

Quick side note, these are all real-life remarks that I've gotten when I told people I was a psych major.

Here we go.

1. So are you, like, analyzing me right now?


Well, I wasn't. But yeah. Now I am.

2. Ugh so jealous! You picked the easy major.


"Lol" is all I have to say to this one. I'm gonna go write my 15-page paper on cognitive impairment. You have fun with your five college algebra problems, though!

3. So can you tell me what you think is wrong with me? *Shares entire life story*


Don't get me wrong; I love listening and helping people get through hard times. But we can save the story about how one time that one friend said that one slightly rude comment to you for later.

4. Well, s**t, I have to be careful what I say around you.


Relax, pal. I couldn't diagnose and/or institutionalize you even if I wanted to.

5. OMG! I have the perfect first client for you! *Proceeds to vent about ex-boyfriend or girlfriend*


Possible good response: simply nod your head the entire time, while actually secretly thinking about the Ben and Jerry's carton you're going to go home and demolish after this conversation ends.

6. So you must kind of be like, secretly insane or something to be into Psychology.


Option one: try and hide that you're offended. Option two: just go with it, throw a full-blown tantrum, and scare off this individual, thereby ending this painful conversation.

7. Oh. So you want to be a shrink?


First off, please. Stop. Calling. Therapists. Shrinks. Second, that's not a psych major's one and only job option.

8. You know you have to go to grad school if you ever want a job in Psychology.


Not completely true, for the record. But I am fully aware that I may have to spend up to seven more years of my life in school. Thanks for the friendly reminder.

9. So you... want to work with like... psychopaths?


Let's get serious and completely not-sarcastic for a second. First off, I take personal offense to this one. Having a mental illness does not classify you as a psycho, or not normal, or not deserving of being treated just like anyone else on the planet. Please stop using a handful of umbrella terms to label millions of wonderful individuals. It's not cool and not appreciated.

10. So can you, like, read my mind?


It actually might be fun to say yes to this one. Try it out and see what happens. Get back to me.

11. You must be a really emotional person to want to work in Psychology.


Psychology is more than about feeling happy, or sad, or angry. Psychology is about understanding the most complex thing to ever happen to us: our brain. How it works the way it does, why it works the way it does, and how we can better understand and communicate with this incredibly mysterious, incredibly vast organ in our tiny little skull. That's what psychology is.

So keep your head up, psychology majors, and don't let anyone discourage you about choosing, what is in my opinion, the coolest career field out there. The world needs more people like us.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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To Percy Jackson, I Hope You're Well...

Percy Jackson and the Olympians and the Heroes of Olympus are both series which helped shape my life. I want to share my love for them here, with you.

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Two days before I moved from New Jersey to California, I had a late night at a friend's house. Just a few miles outside of my small town of Morris Plains, his house was out of the way and a safe haven for myself and my mother during a harrowing and strenuous move. My father had been across the country already for almost two months trying to hold down his new job and prove himself. His absence was trying on me (at the tender young age of nine years old) and my mother, and we often spent time at my friend's home, as our mothers got along well.

That night came the time to say goodbye for the very last time, and as our mothers were tearfully embracing at the door, he ran up to me and shoved a book in my hands. Bewildered and confused, I tried to give him my thanks but he was already gone - running away in a childish fit that expressed his hurt at my leaving more than any words he could've said. I looked down at the book in my hands. It was a battered copy of Rick Riordan's "The Lightning Thief," with its binding bulging slightly out in a strange fashion, the cover slightly torn and bent, and quite a few pages dog-eared. The book wasn't in good condition, but I took the time to read it. I was ensnared and enchanted by the lurid descriptions of mythology, of the lovable characters of Percy, Annabeth, and Grover, and the upside-down world they lived in. Over the course of the move and our eventual settling into our new California home, I devoured the series adamantly, reading "The Battle of the Labyrinth" almost five times in the fifth grade and eventually finishing out with "The Last Olympian." The series accompanied me through a difficult move and a whirlwhind of early puberty; by that time, Percy and friends I knew intimately as my own companions. When the series ended, I happily parted with it, and began other literary conquests (namely in the realm of classics).

After an almost year-long break, I re-discovered the series in sixth grade. I hadn't realized that there was a companion series to the first, in fact, a continuation - The Heroes of Olympus. I lapped up "The Lost Hero" and "The Son of Neptune" with greed, and eagerly awaited the arrival of "The Mark of Athena" the following year.

One of my most vivid memories of middle school was sneaking downstairs the morning of the Kindle release of "The Mark of Athena", sneaking past my parents' bedroom as stealthily as I could in the wee hours of the morning to get my kindle and immerse myself in the world. I believe I finished it in about two days. For the next two books in the series, I followed the same pattern: get up early, read it as fast as I could get my hands on it. "The Blood of Olympus", the last book in the series, came out in my freshman year of high school. After finishing the second series, I shelved my much-loved paperbacks for good, and turned myself to other literary pursuits. I eventually relocated to Virginia, and went to college. Percy and friends were almost forgotten until my first year at the University of Virginia.

I was devastatingly alone my first semester at university. I didn't know what to do with myself, entombed by my loneliness. However, at the bottom of my suitcase, I found my old Kindle Paperwhite, with both of Percy's series neatly installed for me. I made a resolution with myself: I would reread both series, reading only at mealtimes where I sat alone. By the time I was finished, I wanted to see where I was compared to when I started.

Re-reading the series was like coming home. It was nostalgia, sadness, and ecstasy wrapped into one. I delighted in revisiting Percy's old haunts, his friends, his challenges. However, it was sad, knowing I had grown up and left them behind while they had stayed the same. It was a riveting memory train which made me look forward to meals, and eased my loneliness at school. Gradually, as the semester progressed, I was reading on Percy's tales less and less, as I found my friends, clubs, and organizations that gradually took up more and more time.

I still haven't finished my re-read, and am about halfway through "The Blood of Olympus". I've come a long way in the almost decade since I first received that tattered copy of "The Lightning Thief", and I still have some ways to go. So thanks, Percy, Annabeth, Grover, Jason, Piper, Reyna, Nico, Frank, Hazel, Leo. Thank you for growing up with me. I'll never forget you.

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