21 Signs You're A Catholic School Kid

21 Signs You're A Catholic School Kid

You can't imagine how stressful it was for me to pick a different outfit out every day.
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As someone who went to Catholic school from pre-K to twelfth grade, going to a non-religious college was like entering a foreign country. Here are the 20 tell-tale signs that you are hands-down a Catholic School Kid.

1. You knew the same 30-60 people for the majority of your childhood.

When a new kid transferred into class it was equivalent to the wonder and awe of Christmas morning. Finally, a new kid who doesn't know how weird I am and might want to be my friend!

2. You knew summer was over when your mom dragged you to Flynn and O'Hara's for a new uniform because you grew another inch and didn't fit into your old one.

It was probably more painful for the younger siblings who were going to receive "hand-me-downs" anyway and had to just sit there in boring agony.

3. Dress down day was equivalent to New York Fashion Week.

Once a month (but a week when you got to high school) you were blessed with a dress down day. This meant that you needed to donate a dollar and whip out your cutest Delilah's or Kohl's graphic T-shirt, blue jeans, and Uggs. It was also one of the few days you could paint your nails and not get in an obscene amount of trouble for it.

4. The best days were on Holy Days of Obligation.

When you had school on Ash Wednesday, All Saints Day, or May Crowning, you had to go to mass with the entire school. This meant you spent half the day in church and the other half eating lunch and reading a book because your teacher didn't feel like teaching for an hour.

5. Getting to play Mary or Joseph in the nativity skit was the biggest battle/honor of your Catholic School career.

Everyone wanted to play Mary or Joseph. Basically, if you weren't the teacher's pet or your mom didn't e-mail the teacher ahead of time begging her to let you be the star, you were stuck being a shepherd or an angel (or in my little sister's case, the sheep).

6. You knew you were the popular kid when you were asked to read at mass or bring the gifts up during communion.

7. You genuinely had no idea that religion class wasn't offered at public schools until you stopped going to Catholic school.

It honestly never clicked in my brain until I met my friends who went to public school that this was a thing.

8. From 7-8th grade, your friends had birthday parties that were like the school dances, but you didn't need to leave room for the Holy Spirit.

9. You only shaved your knee caps because your knee highs covered all of your legs anyway.

This became super convenient in high school.

10. When you got to high school and there were more relaxed rules about wearing makeup and nail polish.

Admit it, you felt like a total rebel/ beauty queen.

11. You probably went to some lake resort in Pennsylvania for your eighth-grade dance/field trip and thought it was cooler than prom.

12. Your school was either called St. [enter a saint's name], Our Lady of [enter adjective that has something to do with Mary], or Bishop [enter Bishops name you've never heard of until you actually went to the school].

13. When your teacher made you sit in boy-girl order at mass you would nearly pass out because it meant you could possibly be blessed to hold your crush's hand during the "Our Father."

14. The American flag and the cross would be hung up next to each other in each classroom because after morning announcements you would pray and then say the Pledge of Allegiance.

15. Catholic Schools Week was the sh*t.

For one whole week you would get to watch the most athletic kids in your class battle it out in scooter hockey, the smartest kids play Jeopardy against each other, and then eat pizza and ice cream on Friday to celebrate. But the most coveted event of all was watching the 7th vs. 8th-grade basketball game which was more important than the Super Bowl and the Olympics combined.

16. Drama got around really quickly.

I literally watched a rumor be whispered around the classroom like a game of telephone once. You can only trust your ultimate BFF with a secret. If you told anyone else, your news would be spread to your entire grade by recess.

17. Your most accomplished year was the second grade when you learned how to write in cursive, went to confession, and received your first holy communion.

18. You learned never to leave valuables in your desk over the weekend because the CCD kids will 100% take it.

19. You became overwhelmed when you got to college because it wasn't socially acceptable to wear the same outfit every day.

You can't imagine how stressful it was for me to pick a different outfit out every day.

20. The kids on your block thought your family was super rich because you went to private school, but you actually weren't because Catholic school tuition is super expensive.

21. You're still best friends with the kids you went to Catholic School with.

Cover Image Credit: Elizabeth Colagrande

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I Went To "The Bachelor" Auditions

And here's why you won’t be seeing me on TV.
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It’s finally time to admit my guilty pleasure: I have always been a huge fan of The Bachelor.

I can readily admit that I’ve been a part of Bachelor fantasy leagues, watch parties, solo watching — you name it, I’ve gone the whole nine yards. While I will admit that the show can be incredibly trashy at times, something about it makes me want to watch it that much more. So when I found out that The Bachelor was holding auditions in Houston, I had to investigate.

While I never had the intention of actually auditioning, there was no way I would miss an opportunity to spend some time people watching and check out the filming location of one of my favorite TV shows.

The casting location of The Bachelor, The Downtown Aquarium in Houston, was less than two blocks away from my office. I assumed that I would easily be able to spot the audition line, secretly hoping that the endless line of people would beg the question: what fish could draw THAT big of a crowd?

As I trekked around the tanks full of aquatic creatures in my bright pink dress and heels (feeling somewhat silly for being in such nice clothes in an aquarium and being really proud of myself for somewhat looking the part), I realized that these auditions would be a lot harder to find than I thought.

Finally, I followed the scent of hairspray leading me up the elevator to the third floor of the aquarium.

The doors slid open. I found myself at the end of a large line of 20-something-year-old men and women and I could feel all eyes on me, their next competitor. I watched as one woman pulled out her travel sized hair curler, someone practiced answering interview questions with a companion, and a man (who was definitely a little too old to be the next bachelor) trying out his own pick-up lines on some of the women standing next to him.

I walked to the end of the line (trying to maintain my nonchalant attitude — I don’t want to find love on a TV show). As I looked around, I realized that one woman had not taken her eyes off of me. She batted her fake eyelashes and looked at her friend, mumbling something about the *grumble mumble* “girl in the pink dress.”

I felt a wave of insecurity as I looked down at my body, immediately beginning to recognize the minor flaws in my appearance.

The string hanging off my dress, the bruise on my ankle, the smudge of mascara I was sure I had on the left corner of my eye. I could feel myself begin to sweat. These women were all so gorgeous. Everyone’s hair was perfectly in place, their eyeliner was done flawlessly, and most of them looked like they had just walked off the runway. Obviously, I stuck out like a sore thumb.

I walked over to the couches and sat down. For someone who for the most part spent most of the two hours each Monday night mocking the cast, I was shocked by how much pressure and tension I felt in the room.

A cop, stationed outside the audition room, looked over at me. After a brief explanation that I was just there to watch, he smiled and offered me a tour around the audition space. I watched the lines of beautiful people walk in and out of the space, realizing that each and every one of these contestants to-be was fixated on their own flaws rather than actually worrying about “love.”

Being with all these people, I can see why it’s so easy to get sucked into the fantasy. Reality TV sells because it’s different than real life. And really, what girl wouldn’t like a rose?

Why was I so intimidated by these people? Reality TV is actually the biggest oxymoron. In real life, one person doesn’t get to call all the shots. Every night isn’t going to be in a helicopter looking over the south of France. A real relationship depends on more than the first impression.

The best part of being in a relationship is the reality. The best part about yourself isn’t your high heels. It’s not the perfect dress or the great pick-up lines. It’s being with the person that you can be real with. While I will always be a fan of The Bachelor franchise, this was a nice dose of reality. I think I’ll stick to my cheap sushi dates and getting caught in the rain.

But for anyone who wants to be on The Bachelor, let me just tell you: Your mom was right. There really are a lot of fish in the sea. Or at least at the aquarium.

Cover Image Credit: The Cut

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My 2000s Era Childhood Is Back And Better Than Ever

Here's how I feel about how things from my childhood are becoming relevant again.

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From live-action adaptations of popular video game characters to former Disney Channel stars making comebacks, I feel like I'm in elementary school again. While it's nice to see the Jonas Brothers making music together again, it's made me think about a few things. The first being why is there a seemingly sudden influx of adaptions and comebacks of things that were relevant in the past decade? Also, when and what are we going to readapt and make relevant again from 2019 in 2029? Finally, what really is nostalgia and how is our generation's sense of nostalgia unique to others? Here's what I have to say.

I've only been alive for 19 and a half years, and nostalgia has only recently become a new feeling for me. I'm aware that every generation experiences nostalgia and wanting the "good old days back", but when is it supposed to hit? No one ever told me. When you think about it, aren't we a little bit too young to be feeling nostalgic? We're only a few years removed from being considered children, but we haven't truly lived life yet. I only say this because whenever I heard the words "nostalgia" or "the good old days" it was usually coming from an older adult or a senior citizen. I never anticipated using those words truthfully until I was around that age too.

What I think brought out my feelings of nostalgia was when I realized that I was fast approaching the age that most of my favorite childhood TV and movie characters were and that most of them were now well into their twenties and thirties. Personally, I think I took what happened in my favorite shows and movies a little too seriously and translated a lot of what I learned in them to my own personal life, so once I reached the point when I turned 18, around the same age Disney Channel and Nick aged their main characters to in the final seasons, I felt a bit lost. I didn't really know what to expect from life because I hadn't seen what life was supposed to be like as a young adult because I didn't watch anything as a kid where the main plot was centered around a college student. It was kind of my own version of being thrust into the real world with little relevant knowledge.

With the comebacks and adaptations, it's kind of leaving off where my childhood TV shows and movies initially left off however many years ago. Even though I'm not taking it quite as seriously as I did when I was a kid, I do find it nice. I don't have to keep referring to "the good old days" when a lot of what was relevant in my childhood is all of a sudden still relevant. So this time around, I'm definitely going to appreciate things from my childhood while they're still relevant.

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