Start Off Your New Year With These 2019 Book Releases

Start Off Your New Year With These 2019 Book Releases

New year, new you? How about new books?

87
views

If your new year's resolution is to read more, I get you! I've included a wide spectrum of books, all from different themes, genres, and plots! From thrilling suspense to light-hearted contemporary, these intriguing new releases will certainly expand your TBR list and fill your bookshelves, so you'll have plenty of options to choose from to keep you entertained. You're welcome.

Here, I've included my top picks for each new release, meaning new month, new book! This will have you set from January to June!

1. January -- 𝘈𝘯 𝘈𝘯𝘰𝘯𝘺𝘮𝘰𝘶𝘴 𝘎𝘪𝘳𝘭 by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen

Goodreads

From the authors of the bestseller 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘞𝘪𝘧𝘦 𝘉𝘦𝘵𝘸𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘜𝘴 comes a suspenseful novel about passion, doubt, and just how much you can trust someone, even someone who might be hiding a dark, twisted secret.

Here's the synopsis, according to Google Books:

"Seeking women ages 18-32 to participate in a study on ethics and morality. Generous compensation. Anonymity guaranteed. When Jessica Farris signs up for a psychology study conducted by the mysterious Dr. Shields, she thinks all she'll have to do is answer a few questions, collect her money, and leave. But as the questions grow more and more intense and invasive and the sessions become outings where Jess is told what to wear and how to act, she begins to feel as though Dr. Shields may know what she's thinking... and what she's hiding. As Jess's paranoia grows, it becomes clear that she can no longer trust what is real in her life, and what is one of Dr. Shields' manipulative experiments. Caught in a web of deceit and jealousy, Jess quickly learns that some obsessions can be deadly."

2. February -- 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘏𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴 by Kate Quinn

Barnes and Noble

𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘏𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴 is a captivating piece of WWII historical fiction about a battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot who join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America.

Here's the synopsis, according to Google Books:

"In the aftermath of war, the hunter becomes the hunted . . .

On the icy edge of Soviet Russia, bold and reckless Nina Markova joins the infamous Night Witches – an all-female bomber regiment – wreaking havoc on Hitler's eastern front. But when she is downed behind enemy lines and thrown across the path of a lethal Nazi murderess known as the Huntress, Nina must use all her wits to survive.

British war correspondent Ian Graham has witnessed the horrors of war from Omaha Beach to the Nuremberg Trials. He abandons journalism after the war to become a Nazi hunter, yet one target eludes him: the Huntress. Fierce, disciplined Ian must join forces with reckless, cocksure Nina, the only witness to escape the Huntress alive.

In post-war Boston, seventeen-year-old Jordan McBride is delighted when her long-widowed father brings home a fiancée. But Jordan grows increasingly disquieted by the soft-spoken German widow who seems to be hiding something. Delving into her new stepmother's past, Jordan slowly realizes that a Nazi killer may be hiding in plain sight."

3. March -- 𝘎𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘳𝘣𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥 by Helen Oyeyemi

Barnes and Noble

Here's the synopsis, according to Penguin Random House:

"Influenced by the mysterious place gingerbread holds in classic children's stories—equal parts wholesome and uncanny, from the tantalizing witch's house in "Hansel and Gretel" to the man-shaped confection who one day decides to run as fast as he can—beloved novelist Helen Oyeyemi invites readers into a delightful tale of a surprising family legacy, in which the inheritance is a recipe.

Perdita Lee may appear to be your average British schoolgirl; Harriet Lee may seem just a working mother trying to penetrate the school social hierarchy, but there are signs that they might not be as normal as they think they are. For one thing, they share a gold-painted, seventh-floor walk-up apartment with some surprisingly verbal vegetation. And then there's the gingerbread they make. Londoners may find themselves able to take or leave it, but it's very popular in Druhástrana, the far-away (or, according to many sources, non-existent) land of Harriet Lee's early youth. The world's truest lover of the Lee family gingerbread, however, is Harriet's charismatic childhood friend Gretel Kercheval —a figure who seems to have had a hand in everything (good or bad) that has happened to Harriet since they met.

Decades later, when teenaged Perdita sets out to find her mother's long-lost friend, it prompts a new telling of Harriet's story. As the book follows the Lees through encounters with jealousy, ambition, family grudges, work, wealth, and real estate, gingerbread seems to be the one thing that reliably holds a constant value. Endlessly surprising and satisfying, written with Helen Oyeyemi's inimitable style and imagination, it is a true feast for the reader."

4. April -- 𝘋𝘦𝘴𝘤𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘊𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘦 by Joan He

Barnes and Noble


In this Chinese-inspired fantasy, debut author Joan He introduces a determined yet vulnerable young heroine struggling to do right in a world brimming with deception.

Here's the synopsis, according to Google Books:

" 'Tyrants cut out hearts. Rulers sacrifice their own.' Princess Hesina of Yan has always been eager to shirk the responsibilities of the crown, but when her beloved father is murdered, she's thrust into power, suddenly the queen of an unstable kingdom. Determined to find her father's killer, Hesina does something desperate: she engages the aid of a soothsayer--a treasonous act, punishable by death... because, in Yan, magic was outlawed centuries ago.

Using the information illicitly provided by the sooth, and uncertain if she can trust even her family, Hesina turns to Akira--a brilliant and alluring investigator who's also a convicted criminal with secrets of his own. With the future of her kingdom at stake, can Hesina find justice for her father? Or will the cost be too high?"


5. May -- 𝘈𝘨𝘢𝘪𝘯, 𝘉𝘶𝘵 𝘉𝘦𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘳 by Christine Riccio

Goodreads


From beloved book-reviewer YouTuber with over 400,000 subscribers comes a highly-anticipated debut novel 2 years in the making!

Here's the synopsis, according to Google Books:

"Shane has been doing college all wrong. Her life has been dorm, dining hall, class, repeat. She needs a change — there's nothing like moving to a new country to really mix things up. Shane signs up for a semester abroad in London. She's going to right all her college mistakes: make friends, pursue boys, and find adventure! Easier said than done.

She is soon faced with the complicated realities of living outside her bubble, and when self-doubt sneaks in, her new life starts to fall apart.

Shane comes to find that, with the right amount of courage and determination one can conquer anything. Throw in some fate and a touch of magic - the possibilities are endless."

6. June -- 𝘚𝘰𝘳𝘤𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘛𝘩𝘰𝘳𝘯𝘴 by Margaret Rogerson

Barnes and Noble

New York Times bestselling author of 𝘈𝘯 𝘌𝘯𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘙𝘢𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘴, Margaret Rogerson brings forth an imaginative fantasy about an apprentice at a magical library who must battle a powerful sorcerer to save her kingdom.

Here's the synopsis, according to Google Books:

"All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer's Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather. She hopes to become a warden, charged with protecting the kingdom from their power.
Then an act of sabotage releases the library's most dangerous grimoire. Elisabeth's desperate intervention implicates her in the crime, and she is torn from her home to face justice in the capital. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.
As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she's been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined."

Popular Right Now

13 Of The Best, Most Famous Poems Ever Written

Masterpieces by some of our favorites like as Shakespeare, John Donne, and Homer.
80034
views

Some of us read poetry for an eager and fast escape from this world. On the other hand, some of us read poetry solely to share it with the ones we love. There are miracles on paper that can easily be forgotten about if we let them be. The following poems are written by some of our favorites such as Shakespeare, John Donne, Homer, and more. It is clear why these have become some of the most famous and unforgettable poems ever written. So grab a pen, and interpret these poems in your own, unique way.

1. “Go and Catch a Falling Star” - John Donne

Go and catch a falling star,

Get with child a mandrake root,

Tell me where all past years are,

Or who cleft the devil's foot,

Teach me to hear mermaids singing,

Or to keep off envy's stinging,

And find

What wind

Serves to advance an honest mind.

If thou be'st born to strange sights,

Things invisible to see,

Ride ten thousand days and nights,

Till age snow white hairs on thee,

Thou, when thou return'st, wilt tell me,

All strange wonders that befell thee,

And swear,

No where

Lives a woman true, and fair.

If thou find'st one, let me know,

Such a pilgrimage were sweet;

Yet do not, I would not go,

Though at next door we might meet;

Though she were true, when you met her,

And last, till you write your letter,

Yet she

Will be

False, ere I come, to two, or three.

2. “Drinking Alone in the Moonlight” - Li Po

Beneath the blossoms with a pot of wine,

No friends at hand, so I poured alone;

I raised my cup to invite the moon,

Turned to my shadow, and we became three.

Now the moon had never learned about drinking,

And my shadow had merely followed my form,

But I quickly made friends with the moon and my shadow;

To find pleasure in life, make the most of the spring.

Whenever I sang, the moon swayed with me;

Whenever I danced, my shadow went wild.

Drinking, we shared our enjoyment together;

Drunk, then each went off on his own.

But forever agreed on dispassionate revels,

We promised to meet in the far Milky Way.

3. “Sonnet 18” - William Shakespeare

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer's lease hath all too short a date:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;

And every fair from fair sometime declines,

By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade

Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;

Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,

When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

4. “The World Is Too Much with Us” - William Wordsworth

The world is too much with us; late and soon,

Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—

Little we see in Nature that is ours;

We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!

This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;

The winds that will be howling at all hours,

And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;

For this, for everything, we are out of tune;

It moves us not. Great God! I’d rather be

A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;

So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,

Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;

Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;

Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.

5. “She Walks in Beauty” - Lord Byron

She walks in beauty, like the night

Of cloudless climes and starry skies;

And all that’s best of dark and bright

Meet in her aspect and her eyes;

Thus mellowed to that tender light

Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,

Had half impaired the nameless grace

Which waves in every raven tress,

Or softly lightens o’er her face;

Where thoughts serenely sweet express,

How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,

So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,

The smiles that win, the tints that glow,

But tell of days in goodness spent,

A mind at peace with all below,

A heart whose love is innocent!

6. “How Do I Love Thee?”- Elizabeth Browning

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of being and ideal grace.
I love thee to the level of every day’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for right.
I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,












I shall but love thee better after death.

7. “ Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” -Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village though;

He will not see me stopping here

To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer

To stop without a farmhouse near

Between the woods and frozen lake

The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake

To ask if there is some mistake.

The only other sound’s the sweep

Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,

But I have promises to keep,

And miles to go before I sleep,

And miles to go before I sleep.

8. The Jabberwocky” - Lewis Carroll

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!

The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!

Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun

The frumious Bandersnatch!”

He took his vorpal sword in hand;

Long time the manxome foe he sought—

So rested he by the Tumtum tree

And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,

The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through

The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

He went galumphing back.

“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?

Come to my arms, my beamish boy!

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”

He chortled in his joy.

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.

9. “Tears Fall in My Heart” - Paul Verlaine

Tears fall in my heart

Rain falls on the town;

what is this numb hurt

that enters my heart?

Ah,the soft sound of rain

on roofs, on the ground!

To a dulled heart they came,

ah, the song of the rain!

Tears without reason

in the disheartened heart.

What? no trace of treason?

This grief's without reason.

It's far the worst pain

to never know why

without love or disdain

my heart has such pain!

10. “We Wear the Mask” - Paul Lawrence Dunbar

We wear the mask that grins and lies,

It hides our cheeks and shades our eyes,—

This debt we pay to human guile;

With torn and bleeding hearts we smile,

And mouth with myriad subtleties.

Why should the world be over-wise,

In counting all our tears and sighs?

Nay, let them only see us, while

We wear the mask.

We smile, but, O great Christ, our cries

To thee from tortured souls arise.

We sing, but oh the clay is vile

Beneath our feet, and long the mile;

But let the world dream otherwise,

We wear the mask!

11. “The Panther” - Rainer Maria Rilke

His vision, from the constantly passing bars,

has grown so weary that it cannot hold

anything else. It seems to him there are

a thousand bars; and behind the bars, no world.

As he paces in cramped circles, over and over,

the movement of his powerful soft strides

is like a ritual dance around a center

in which a mighty will stands paralyzed.

Only at times, the curtain of the pupils

lifts, quietly--. An image enters in,

rushes down through the tensed, arrested muscles,

plunges into the heart and is gone.

12. “Sea Fever” - John Masefield

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,

And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by;

And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking,

And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.

I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide

Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;

And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,

And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,

To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife;

And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,

And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.

13. "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Goodnight" -Dylan Thomas

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

















Save these poems for your next coffee shop date or solitude moment. You might be surprised at how much you can find yourself in a poem.

Cover Image Credit: Thought Catalog

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

16 Candid Stories About Famous Authors That Are More Interesting Than The Stories They Wrote

Sometimes the stories authors create within their own lives are far more interesting than the stories they create on paper.

22
views

Throughout history, authors have written millions of stories that entertain people around the world. However, sometimes the stories they create within their own lives are far more interesting than the stories they create on paper.

1. Mary Shelley Kept Her Dead Husband's Heart in a Jar Postmortem

Giphy

Percy Shelley died in a shipwreck, and when his body was found, it was burned. During the burning, a friend of his saw the heart and salvaged it. Later, it was given to Mary Shelley, and in turn, she kept the heart in a jar until she died.

2. No One Knows How Edgar Allan Poe Died

Giphy

The death of Edgar Allan Poe is a mystery to everyone. The man was found wandering the streets in a drunken state, in another person's clothes. He was confused and didn't know where he was. He was calling out for a man named Reynolds.

3. Jane Austen Never Married

Giphy

The most romantic writer of all time, never married. Austen was engaged for about twenty-four hours. However, the next day, she turned around and said she could not marry the fellow because she was not truly in love with him.

4. Lord Byron Is Infamous for Incest

https://ofallingstar.tumblr.com/post/174643120053/mary-shelley-2017

In his early years, Byron fell in love with a cousin of his. This loved sparked the poems "Hills of Annesley" and "The Adieu." Later on in life, Byron had a strange infatuation with his sister. The infatuation was so strong that his wife left him because of it. There are rumors that he had an affair with his sister.

5. Mary Shelley's Virginity

https://edge-and-back.com/post/174494239987/mary-shelley-2017-we-created-monsters/embed

There is a reason that no one is more goth that Mary Shelley. During her youth, Mary spent a lot of time in the graveyard visiting with her mother. When she met Percy Shelley, this was the place they would meet to spend time together. Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin's grave is also the site where Mary Shelley lost her virginity. Yes, Mary Shelley lost her virginity to Percy Shelley on top of her mother's grave.

6. Agatha Christie Went Missing

Giphy

In December 1962, following an argument with her husband, Agatha left a note for her secretary saying she was going to Yorkshire. At 9:45, she left their home and later her car was found at Newlands Corner, parked above a chalk quarry with expired driving license and clothes. Over a thousand police officers, 15,000 volunteers, and several airplanes searched the landscape for her. Agatha was not found for ten days, even though there was an ongoing search. On December 14, 1926, she was found at the Swan Hydropathic Hotel in Harrogate, Yorkshire where she was registered as Mrs.Teresa Neele from Cape Town. The name is the same as the woman who Agatha's husband was having an affair with.

7. Crying In Charles Dickens' Yard

https://giphy.com/gifs/nap-76m5Bi78d3QYM

At one point in his life, Hans Christian Anderson received a bad review. In light of this situation, Hans decided to lay face-down in the dirt to cry. However, the funniest part of this is that he was not just laying in any patch of dirt, Anderson was laying in a patch of dirt in Charles Dickens' yard.

8. Victor Hugo And Bats

Giphy

At one point in his life, Victor Hugo gave his wife, then fiancee, a bat in an envelope. Romance level: Ozzy Osborne.

9. Percy Shelley Believed in 'Free Love'

https://edge-and-back.com/post/174494239987/mary-shelley-2017-we-created-monsters/embed

Percy Shelley, a famous poet as well as Mary Shelley's husband, is known for believing in 'free love.' Essentially, this is the idea that anyone could love whoever they wanted. On the surface, this is a wonderful concept, and definitely, an idea that was before his time, however, it did cause issues. Mary Shelley was not Percy's first wife. He started courting Mary before his first wife had divorced him, or anything of the sort. And during his relationship with Mary, he had affairs with countless other people. It's even speculated that he had an affair with Mary's step-sister, Claire.

10. Magic and Sir Author Conan Doyle

https://gfycat.com/falsewideblueandgoldmackaw

You may know Sir Author Conan Doyle as the man who invented the Sherlock Holmes series. During his life, he was friends with Harry Houdini. The two were friends until Houdini discovered that Doyle truly believed he (Houdini) had magical powers.

11. Elizabeth Gaskell's Secret Home

Giphy

The Victorian novelist, Elizabeth Gaskell, bought a home in Hampshire which she kept a secret from her husband. However, sadly, while having tea with her daughters, she had a heart attack. Her husband didn't know about the house until after she had passed.

12. Emily Dickinson or Boo Radley?

Giphy

Emily Dickinson was notoriously a recluse during her life. She didn't leave home that often, and when she did it was to tend to the garden. She was such a recluse that she didn't even leave her bedroom upstairs to attend her fathers funeral that was being held downstairs.

13. Vladimir Nabokov and Tiny Stories

https://www.telltaletv.com/2015/10/doctor-who-review-under-the-lake-season-9-episode-3/dw-s9-e3-index-cards/

Okay, maybe they weren't tiny. It is said that Nabokov wrote all of his stories on index cards as a way to piece together the pieces of the plots. Tedious work.

14. Ernest Hemingway's Urinal

Giphy

At one point in his life, Ernest Hemmingway stole a urinal from a bar called Sloppy Joe's. Hemingway stated that he "pissed away enough money" in the bar, therefore he deserved to own the urinal.

15. Samuel Beckett and Andre the Giant

Giphy

Beckett and Andre the Giant were close friends, and therefore Andre's dad, Boris Rousimoff, helped Beckett build his farm. In exchange, Beckett would drive Andre to school every day.

16. Haruki Murakami and Baseball

Giphy

The whole reason Haruki Murakami started writing novels was because, one day at a baseball game at Jingu Stadium, he decided it would be a fun idea. That same night he started writing Hear the Wild Sing.

It's obvious that authors not only created stories for people to read. Authors created stories within their lives that people will still learn about years after their passing. These authors were some of the most interesting people to ever live!

Related Content

Facebook Comments