19 Signs You're From South Jersey

19 Signs You're From South Jersey

South Jersey breeds a unique type of human, and it will always be our home.
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If you are from South Jersey, you are a unique breed of human who has been blessed with Wawa, pork roll, Philadelphia, beach trips, all-service gas stations, hoagies, water ice, and more. The population of South Jersians can relate to so many things that everyone else in the country can't- this list is just to name a few.

1. It is pork roll, not Taylor Ham.

Let's get this one out of the way first. Every South Jersian knows that “pork roll” is the product — the meat — and “Taylor” is the brand. We don’t refer to bacon as “Oscar Meyer.” It is literally not even ham, and the word “ham” actually appears nowhere on the Taylor brand packaging. That’s all I have to say about that.

2. Wawa is the beloved, convenient, delicious, and sacred place that we worship.

Easily our most common go-to. In fact, you can typically find 4 different Wawa’s within 5 miles of you at all times. If anyone closed their eyes and dreamed of the best convenient store possible, it would be Wawa.

3. NYC is cool, but Philly is your city.

Spruce Street Harbor Park, Independence Mall, Magic Gardens, Center City Sips, cheesesteaks, Graffiti Pier, and endlessly more — Philly gives you everything you could need for a beautiful night and only we know how underrated it is.

4. You probably do not know how to pump gas.

If you have driven out of state, you may have had to figure it out by now, but for the most part, we have the luxury of not needing to know this skill. Fill it up regular, please!

5. A day trip to the beach is your bliss.

If you’re from South Jersey, you have a long list of beach options — and you most likely have a favorite. Between LBI, Ocean City, Wildwood, Seaside, Avalon, Sea Isle, Atlantic City, and more- we are certainly spoiled.

6. Our slang is different.

For whatever reason, our vocabulary is quite unique — even compared to North Jersey. Especially among teenagers, we have an abundance of special jargon.

7. It’s a hoagie. Not a "sub." It will always be a hoagie.

We all love our Wawa Hoagiefest. No one can ever tell us differently — a sub is a submarine boat and Subway is an underground railway system.

8. And people call them “jimmies,” not sprinkles. Oh, and it’s "water ice" not Italian ice.

Clearly, we like having our own South Jersian language.

9. You learned to drive with pretty awful road rage.

You are surrounded by road rage here, especially if heading toward Philly or New York. It’s the land of honking, cutting off and middle fingers. The lovely picture above is from the New Jersey Turnpike.

10. Honestly, you probably dislike North Jersey.

For some reason, Jersey has pretty much segregated itself into two different states. Or three, I guess, if you’re someone who counts Central Jersey. The rivalry is real — in fact, any North Jersian reading this has probably physically cringed multiple times by now.

11. Your accent is subtle, but yet pretty distinct.

We tend to have an accent on words such as cawfee, wooter, and begel. We certainly do not have a “joisey” accent, but something is still a little off.

12. There is no “New” in New Jersey.

Ok, obviously there is, but as you can tell already within this article, we really do not often use the “New” part. Too much inconvenience for us I assume.

13. You probably make a trip (or five) to BB&T Pavilion every summer.

Or “Susquehanna” as the more original concert-goers will still refer to it as- the lawn is basically the best place to be (except when you lose all your friends and have no service). It’s also usually a high school reunion to see all your hometown friends on break.

14. You have everything you could want within driving distance.

Philly one way, or the beach the other way, or NYC another way, or even the Poconos when you need some mountains and skiing. We’ve got everything.

15. The weather is dramatic and bipolar.

One day could be sunny and 75, and the next it could be snowing. The concept of specific seasons is iffy.

16. You probably describe where you live in reference to Philly or Cherry Hill.

When an out-of-stater asks you where in Jersey you are from, you most likely give a response along the lines of “just outside of Cherry Hill,” or “about half an hour from Philly.”

17. You live within 20 minutes of multiple different malls.

You will be able to find multiple decent shopping malls anywhere you are in South Jersey- a real convenient blessing.

18. You most likely know at least 10 people that go to Rutgers.

Being our biggest and most popular state school- you are guaranteed to know a good handful of people that found their way there after high school.

19. Lastly, you are proud of our little “armpit” corner of the country.

As much as we may talk bad about it and complain about wanting to leave, we know it’ll always be home. South Jersey breeds a special type of person.

SEE ALSO: The Garden State Guide To Essential Jersey Slang

Cover Image Credit: https://twitter.com/wawa/status/718019343544684544

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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As An Original Northeasterner, I Grew To Love The South And You Can, Too

Where the tea is sweet, and the accents are sweeter.

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I'm not Southern-born. I'll come right out and say it. I was born in Connecticut and moved to Atlanta when I was 9 years old. I didn't know a single thing about the South, so I came without any expectations. When I got here, I remember that the very first thing I saw was a Waffle House. I thought it was so rare to see whatever a waffle house was but little did I know there was a WaHo (how southerners refer to Waffle House) every two miles down the street.

There is such a thing as "southern hospitality," and it's very pleasant for a newcomer to see. Southerners are raised with such a refreshing sense of politeness, and their accents are beautifully unique. It brings a smile to my face when I hear a southern accent because it's such a strong accent and one of my favorites. They answer your questions with "Yes, ma'am" or "No, ma'am" in the most respectful tone. I remember feeling so grown and empowered just because I got called ma'am. Southerners' vocabulary and phrases really have its ways of integrating into your own vernacular.

Before I came to Georgia, I never really said words like "Y'all" and "Fixin' to" but it's definitely in much of what I say now. I can tell when I go back up north to visit family that some of what I say may sound a little off because the dialect is very different. I find no shame in it, though, and neither should any southerner.

The weather in the South isn't so bad, in my opinion. Sure, there is very high humidity, but after living here for 10+ years, you learn how to deal with it. However, there's nothing like the summer thunderstorms. I love stormy, rainy weather and it rains quite often in the south, so when my birthday in July rolls around, I look forward to seeing that rain. It's the most peaceful weather to me and inspires me to write even more.

I could go on and on about the amazing fried foods here or the iconic yet insane Atlanta traffic, but those aren't what make me love the South. The people of the south are so different from up north but in the best ways. Everyone is so expressive and creative, as well as their own unique self. Southerners aren't the shaming kinds of people, but instead the kind who embrace who you are from the start. There's a fierce loyalty and a strong sense of appreciation that is just unmatched by any other place. No matter where I go, I always find comfort in knowing that I'll be coming back to this place I'm proud to call home.

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