100 Things I Learned My Freshman Year Of College

100 Things I Learned My Freshman Year Of College

“I live at the lib” is a coined term.
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1. Diets don’t work

2. No drama from high school matters anymore, and it should never have

3. Nothing is as good as a home cooked meal

4. It’s best to talk to people when you need to get something off your chest

5. I didn’t need to know my major and have my life planned ahead of me so far in advance

6. I like to be alone a lot

7. My handwriting isn’t as nice as I thought it was (found this out in lectures where professors speak too fast)

8. I spend too much spare time on social media

9. Walking is a beautiful thing

10. Keeping my room clean is necessary but wasn’t always done

11. Coffee and water can save your life

12. Soda is a drink from the devil and I dropped drinking it (finally listened, mom)

13. My dorm bed will never be comfortable

14. Nothing will ever be more comfortable than my bed back home

15. Dogs really are a form of therapy

16. My homework still doesn’t get done until the deadline (didn’t actually learn from doing this)

17. Netflix is needed

18. In a library, no reading or checking out of books really happens

19. Fish are good pets (when you’re deprived of all other pets not allowed in dorms)

20. Becoming friends with people who work in the café has its perks

21. I really love/ hate elevators

22. I can be friends with anyone who is different than me, similarities or differences don’t define our friendship

23. I really need a job

24. my school has more resources than I could ever imagine (thankful for that)

25. I can actually live in a box if I wanted to (since college forced me to)

26. I don’t need to wear makeup every day and I’ll be OK

27. I need more long sleeve T’s and athletic shorts cause that’s about all I wear now

28. How to wake up 30 minutes before class and make it on time (an everyday thing)

29. Making time to Facetime/call friends and family is a need

30. Group chats with friends from home and talking in them daily does wonders for your friendship

31. Getting involved is scary but so beneficial

32. I waste so much money on fast food

33. I waste too much money in general

34. Talking to my suitemates/roommate every day made college easier

35. I can wear what I want no one’s opinions, comments or actions will stop me

36. My mom was probably right (many different scenarios)

37. I have never felt creepier online before but that’s how you meet people these days

38. I still don’t have a Linked in (maybe I’ll learn that my sophomore year)

39. No matter how many times I say I’m going to the gym today, I don’t

40. It’s nearly impossible to eat healthy in the café

41. Cereal is an important meal

42. A lot of people are very passive and I am direct

43. I learned what a feminist actually was and can agree I am one finally

44. Don’t discuss topics you’re not familiar with, look them up

45. Women and Gender’s courses aren’t that bad

46. Math is still very bad, and still very pointless for my major

47. Being a kiss up to professors in college is good

48. Rate my professor is a gift from the gods

49. Councilors in high school are very different than the ones in college (College councilors won’t help you make your schedule)

50. It always pays off to be nice

51. I actually like when strangers smile at me

52. Spotify premium is premium

53. Laundry, I learned how to do laundry and it’s not bad

54. Misplacing my shower shoes is a literal nightmare

55. Hats are a key accessory

56. Polaroid pictures capture the best memories

57. Taking videos, or at least snap videos are always fun to look back at

58. Rain jackets and umbrellas do wonders

59. Skipping class because of bad weather makes you lazy, I’m lazy

60. I have so much free time but always complain about being so busy

61. The weather app has become one of my most used apps

62. I need more socks (because mine are all dirty or disappear)

63. Girls aren’t so catty (knock on wood but so far so good)

64. Once I stopped lifting girls up and not tearing them down I became happier

65. I will always want endless back rubs

66. Bringing a pillow/blankets to the library is socially acceptable (as many students claim they live there)

67. “I live at the lib” is a coined term.

68. Ordering food to the library makes you an asshole but a smart asshole

69. Condoms are everywhere (shout out to practicing safe sex I guess)

70. Giving my phone to someone else while doing homework gets work done

71. Becoming close with my roommate was the key reasoning in why my year went so smoothly

72. Always do the extra credit if you have the opportunity

73. Having slip on shoes is key

74. Makeup remover should be used every night

75. Every human being cries

76. Group projects still suck but they got even suckier

77. I should have never dropped Spanish in high school

78. Making friends with people in your classes will make them much easier

79. There’s always going to be someone you don’t like and the beauty of college is you don’t have to be by them or ever see them.

80. I never want to host a party

81. People are generally not very smart while intoxicated

82. $2 tacos are my new favorite meal

83. Not having a car is a lot easier than I thought it would be

84. Wearing sunglasses to class is still weird (I think, not sure though)

85. I need to put lotion in my backpack (this is actually a reminder since I never learned to do this)

86. Purchasing a nice water bottle is so worth it, you will use it every day and thank yourself

87. Your family/friends at home would probably love an update on your life at any given point

88. It’s OK to do things you want to do even if others don’t agree with them

89. Breakfast is still the most important meal of the day, especially on the weekends

90. People watching is such a thrill

91. Volunteering is so easy to do

92. It’s not OK to BS homework especially papers

93. The dorm showers don’t clean themselves and should be cleaned more than once each semester

94. Parka season is actually about 7 out of 9 months

95. I should have taken stuff home little by little so move out was easier

96. It’s OK to order pizza again if you really want pizza

97. Professors are willing to work with you if you are willing to work with them

98. There is no one you need to impress but yourself

99. I have an amazing support system

100. I live a pretty good life.

Cover Image Credit: Sierra Gardner

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If South Carolina Colleges Were Characters From 'The Office'

Who's Jim and who's Meredith?
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"The Office" is one of the best shows on the face of the planet. Don't believe me, you obviously haven't watched it. It has a character for everything, including all of the South Carolina colleges.

The Citadel

This one is probably the easiest. Creed Bratton. Hands down. Military all day every day. No one knows what really goes on behind closed doors, except the people there. Just like Creed's mind.

Coastal Carolina University

Consistently voted one of the top party schools in the nation. #It'snotcollegeit'sCoastal.

Winthrop University

Winthrop is the place for future teachers. We all know that Meredith is the mother/teacher figure in the office, which is kind of scary in and of itself.

Columbia College

Erin just seems like the type of person who would go to an all-female college.

Bob Jones University

At what other school do you see people wearing things that could be from the American Girl large colonial dolls Spring line?

Wofford College

The pearls, Greek Life, and Southern fashion are so real.

Furman University

Let's be real. Pam is a bit of a nerd. But at the end of the day, she does know how to get down. I mean she WAS on the party planning committee. And who doesn't want that Ring By Spring?

College of Charleston

Nard Dog is definitely in an a capella group in Charleston, taking in the city and the history while dressing like a frat star.

Medical University of South Carolina

Andy isn't alone in Charleston. Dwight is down there becoming a doctor. Yes, someone who can save lives and is able to do surgery. Although, who else would you expect to be a doctor?

University of South Carolina

There would be no South Carolina without the University of South Carolina. There would be no office without Michael Scott. The later seasons prove it. They're large and in charge.

Clemson University

While Michael thinks that he runs the office, it's no secret that Jim is the mastermind behind the operation. The office would fall apart without him. I'll just let that sit.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube

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Your Brain Is More Than A Bag of Chemicals

In David Anderson's 2013 Ted Talk, the Caltech professor discusses the downfalls of mental healthcare in our society, opening a discussion to wider societal issues.

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David Anderson, in his Ted Talk "Your Brain is Not a Bag of Chemicals" dives into the world of treatment for psychiatric illnesses, of scientific research, and of fruit flies. His goal, to explain the flaws in current treatments of mental illnesses and present how this downfalls could be resolved is clear throughout the talk. Through presenting his research, and speaking of novel contributions such as the actual discovery of emotion in fruit flies, Anderson displays the flaws in mental healthcare and demands more of the scientific world to resolve these downfalls.

As Anderson explains, the traditional view of mental illnesses is that they are a chemical imbalance in the brain. He states, "As if the brain were some kind of bag of chemical soup filled with dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine." He explains the difference for typical treatments of physical ailments versus psychological ailments. As he describes it, physical ailments presented to a physician will lead to blood tests, biological assays, and various other factors to gather information about what is going on in the body so that a treatment plan can be well-suited to that issue. However, for psychological problems, the patient is often handed a questionnaire to assess the issues. These questionnaires, as he suggests, are insufficient in understanding the complexities that surround mental illnesses.

Of medication prescribed for mental illnesses, Anderson states, "These drugs have so many side effects because using them to treat a complex psychiatric disorder is a bit like trying to change your engine oil by opening a can and pouring it all over the engine block. Some of it will dribble into the right place, but a lot of it will do more harm than good." Anderson uses the example of dopamine and the model organism of fruit flies to explain this concept. He explains how in certain illnesses, such as ADHD, there is not a complete understanding of why there are features of learning disabilities and hyperactivity. Without this understanding, the treatment of just increasing the amount of dopamine in one's system is lacking.

Anderson suggests that pharmaceutical companies and scientists should do more research to not only discover the disturbances of neural pathways, which tend to be the real cause of mental illnesses, but to also develop new medications that attempt to resolve these specific pathways and specific receptors, rather than simply increasing the amount of a certain neurochemical. These new medications could and do revolutionize the way that mental illnesses are treated, and the efficacy in their treatment.

As a society, there is a general view of mental illnesses that varies greatly from the view of physical illnesses. Anderson, without directly discussing it, acknowledges this exact problem. He discusses the differences in treatments, but also the lack of resources that are put in to truly understand how to better treat mental illnesses as disturbances in neurophysiological components. Without, as a society, acknowledging and respecting mental illnesses for what they are, we are short-changing the 25% of the world who is directly impacted by these illnesses, and the countless loved ones who stand by those impacted. A shift needs to occur, and the research and ideas that Anderson presents are a wonderful scientific starting point for these shifts. However, if we as a society do not support the principles behind this science, do not support the concept that mental illness is much more than just being a little emotionally reactive, we are doing a disservice to the majority of the population.

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