10 Things Social Work Majors Are Tired Of Hearing

10 Things Social Work Majors Are Tired Of Hearing

We are not baby snatchers!
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As a social work major, you most likely have a love for people and helping others! If you are not a people person, perhaps you have picked the wrong major. But, that is a different story! Social work majors are friendly, loving and put up with ALOT! Because our profession will have us working with different populations and different scenarios daily. Future social workers are prepared and ready for what the world has to throw at them. However, it is hard to grin and be happy go lucky when you constantly are being told that your future job is going to make little to no money. More than likely, if you ask a social work major why this is their chosen major, they will tell you they enjoy helping others. They might even tell you a social worker influenced their life in some way and this is their way of giving back to the help they once had.

Below is a list of things social workers are tired of hearing! Believe me, we get asked these all the time and it is getting old real quick!

1. "Clearly, you are not in the social work profession for the money. Because you know that you are going to be broke, right?"

Well, Suzy Sunshine, I actually will make a decent income for myself. Please educate yourself on the hundreds of professions I can obtain with my bachelor's degree, and then consider how much more I will make with my master's and even Ph.D For the love of all that is holy, please do not tell a social work major they are going to make no money! Even though this is a rewarding career, we still plan to make a living and make a difference!

2. "Oh, so you are going to be a baby snatcher?"

Not all social workers work in child protective services (CPS), and the term baby snatcher is offensive and incorrect. We prefer doing what is best for the child's lives rather than snatching them!

3. "What do social workers even do?"

Have you ever put your grandparent in the nursing home? Have you ever met someone that needed help with addiction? Has a loved one ever passed away in a hospital? Have you ever been to counseling? Do you have someone you know in jail? We do a lot, look around and you will most likely find a social worker everywhere you go.

4. "Good luck finding a job!"

Where there are people, there will be a need for social workers.

5. "Is there really a growing need for social workers?"

People need help every single day, so yes there is a growing need! Social workers are in high demand.

6. "What an easy major!"

Yes, it is so easy! I have a 30-page research paper, assessments to evaluate a client's needs, a 400+ hour internship where I have my own clients, and a whole bunch of ethics I follow daily. Yes, do tell us how easy you think that is and get back to me.

7. "You must be a real people person."

If I did not like people, I would most likely be in the wrong major. Seeing as social workers help people.

8. "So, you must really like working with poor people?"

Social workers work with all populations. Not everyone is poor. Middle and upper-class people might even need our help. Example: placing a loved one in a nursing home, death of a family member and individual or marriage counseling.

9 ."Why do you want to help people that who clearly cannot help themselves?"

This question makes us angry. Everyone at some point in their lives becomes vulnerable and need help. Think of that next time you need help.

10. "Oh, so you want to work with kids?"

Social workers do not just work with kids. We work with all ages!



Next time you want to ask a social work major a question, please refrain from the top 10 listed. We do so much more than "snatch babies" and if you want to Google our income, feel free because it is probably more than you thought!


Cover Image Credit: My own photo

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To All Incoming Freshmen, When You Get To College, Please Don't Be THAT Freshman

I am pretty sure we all know who I'm talking about.

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As we are all counting down the days to return to campus, students are looking forward to meeting new people and reuniting with old friends. And then, there is the freshman.

We have all been there. The eagerness and excitement have been slowly building up through months of summer vacation, all waiting for this moment. I understand the anxiousness, enthusiasm, and insecurities. The opportunity to meet new people and explore a new area is very intriguing. But let's be real, you are here to make memories and get an education. So here are a few pieces of advice from a former college freshman.

1. Don't be that freshman who follows their significant other to college

This is the boy or girl who simply can not think for themselves. The 17-year-old puts their own personal goals and interests aside to sacrifice for a six-month high school relationship. This will more than likely end at an end of semester transfer after the relationship has been tested for a month or two in college life. So if you want to really enjoy your freshman year, make your own decisions and do what is best for you.

2. Don't be that freshman who lets their parents pick their major

"You are not going to school just to waste my money."

This is a statement you might have heard from your parents. As true as it might seem, this is definitely not a good way to start your college years. If you are not majoring in something you can see yourself doing, you are wasting your time. You can major in biology, go to medical school, and make the best grades. But if deep down you don't want to be a doctor, you will NOT end up being a good doctor. When it comes to picking your major, you really have to follow your heart.

3. Don't be that freshman who gets overwhelmed with the first taste of freedom

Yes. It is all very exciting. You don't have a curfew, you don't have rules, you don't have anyone constantly nagging you, but let's not get carried away. Don't be the freshman who gets a tattoo on the first night of living on your own. Don't be the freshman who tries to drink every liquor behind the bar. Don't be the freshman who gets caught up being someone that they aren't. My best advice would be to take things slow.

4. Don't be that freshman who starts school isolated in a relationship

I'm not telling you not to date anyone during your freshman year. I am saying to not cut yourself off from the rest of the world while you date someone. Your first year on campus is such an amazing opportunity to meet people, but people are constantly eager to start dating someone and then only spend time with that person.

Be the freshman who can manage time between friends and relationships.

5. Don't be that freshman who can't handle things on their own

It is your first year on your own. Yes, you still need help from your parents. But at this point, they should not be ordering your textbooks or buying your parking pass. If you need something for a club or for class, YOU should handle it. If you're having roommate problems, YOU should handle it, not your parents. This is the real world and college is a great time for you to start building up to be the person you want to be in the future, but you can't successfully do that if your parents still deal with every minor inconvenience for you.

6. Don't be that freshman who only talks to their high school friends

I know your high school was probably amazing, and you probably had the coolest people go there. However, I believe that college is a great time to be on your own and experience new things. Meeting new people and going to new places will allow you to grow into a more mature person. There is a way to balance meeting new friends and maintaining friendships with childhood friends, and I am sure you will find that balance.

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I Wish My Big Ten School Was Known For Education, Not Football

College football is great, but education is the reason that most students choose their university.

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College football is a big deal to lots of universities. At schools like Ohio State, it is a really big deal. Although I personally don't care about football, I think that it is a great way to build a sense of community and camaraderie among students. It is fun, gives many schools a worldwide presence, and allows us students to have a sense of overwhelming pride in our school.

I just don't want that pride to outweigh the pride in the education itself. Unless you're a football player, you go to college primarily to learn and build your future. Football is fun, but sometimes I wish that society associates my school with an education rather than a single sport.

I cannot count the number of times that I told people that I go to OSU, and they responded by saying something along the lines of "Oh no, I'm a Michigan fan!" If they're referring to how The University of Michigan has some academic programs that are usually ranked higher than those at Ohio State, then I wouldn't blame them. Heck, it is ignorant not to acknowledge the truth in that-- if Michigan hadn't cost a thousand times more than what I'm paying now, I honestly might have chosen to be a student there.

Back to the point, though. I'm proud to go to OSU. At this time in life, I wouldn't want to be going anywhere else. Attending a school known for football was ultimately my decision, but that factor itself wasn't the reason. Admittedly, since I started college, I came to realize that all students aren't as football-crazy as I anticipated. One game day when I was studying in the library, a handful of guys came in yelling "OH" and expecting an "IO" back. They were met with silence until someone studying a few floors above them shouted back "F*** off!"

That story always reminds me that big schools like Ohio State really are for everyone. OSU excels in its education and wide variety of extracurricular opportunities. I don't love my school because of football-- I love my school because of the challenging academics, amazing faculty, and strong community. I think that it is time for the general public to see it that way too.

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