10 Things all College Students Interested in Politics Understand.

10 Things all College Students Interested in Politics Understand.

Yes, I know politics is a very stressful hobby
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1. Your email being overflowed by all the candidates running for offices in your area.

2. Your roommate is subject to your politic rants.



3. Being embarrassed for your peers when you read their LENGTHY Facebook posts complaining about government.

4. Writing your congress person on the regular.

5. The feeling you get after voting.

6. Telling other people to vote.

7. That feeling you get when your candidate wins.

8. ...Or when they don't.


9. Hoping that our nation will get it together.

10. Understanding that it takes all kinds to make the world go round.

Cover Image Credit: Lydia Doss

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Jason Kulpa, San Diego CEO and Founder of Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship, Reveals 3 Smart Ways to Tame the High Cost of College

The cost of college is going nowhere but up, but you do not have to succumb to all that debt.

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If you are worried about the high cost of higher education, you are not alone. With the cost of college tuition going nowhere but up and financial aid holding steady or going down, even middle- and upper-class parents often worry that they will not be able to make their dreams of a college education for their children come true.

No matter who you are or where you live, the cost of a college education keeps going up. If you want to help your son or daughter graduate without crippling college loan debt, you need to think out of the box and look for creative ways to tame the high cost of a college education.

Apart from applying to scholarships to fund higher education, such as the Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship (learn more at www.jasonkulpawife.com), there are three strategies you can use to reduce the cost of college without sacrificing the education your child needs and deserves.

1. Use Tuition Assistance to Enhance Your Career at Virtually No Cost

Even in today's high-cost college environment, there is a way to get an excellent education and do it at virtually no cost. This path may take longer, but the thought of graduating from college with a stable full-time income and no debt whatsoever is undoubtedly an attractive one.

There is something to be said for entering the workforce right after high school, and a growing number of young people are considering this option. Many employers offer tuition assistance to even entry-level workers and going to college part time while working full time is more feasible than ever, thanks to the widespread availability of online learning and virtual college courses.

If you take this approach, you could graduate with marketable skills your current employer will appreciate, setting you up for future promotions and a higher salary. Best of all, the cost of that education could be negligible, putting you on a sound financial footing and helping you enjoy even greater success while your peers are struggling with college debt.

2. Take Advantage of Work/Study Opportunities

Working your way through school does not necessarily mean delivering pizzas on the weekend or tending bar in the evenings. Many colleges provide work/study opportunities for their students, giving young people the chance to earn a living while securing their future education.

Some of these work/study opportunities are limited a single field of education, while others are open to all. If you are looking for a way to avoid college loan debt, you owe it to yourself to check out these work/study opportunities and take advantage of them when you can.

3. Start with a Community College Education

Compared to the cost of a four-year college or university, the price of community college is a real bargain. More and more community colleges are offering courses specifically designed to give budget-conscious learners a head start on the education they need.

Taking your first year or two of education at a community college could save you a ton of money on tuition and room and board. Once you have a solid background in your course of study, you can transfer your community college credits to a four-year school and continue your education without incurring huge college loan debt.

The cost of college is going nowhere but up, but you do not have to succumb to all that debt. If you are willing to think outside the box and take an unorthodox path to higher education, in addition to seeking out and applying for niche scholarships such as the Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship, you could escape the college loan trap and get a jump start on a great career.

About: The Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship is just one of several investments Jason Kulpa has pledged to his community. Jason Kulpa founded San Diego based UE.co in 2008 after holding operations positions at a number of fast-growing Ad-Tech companies. Since becoming CEO, he has taken a hands-on approach to driving strategic partnerships and creating a company culture that promotes innovation and respect for high-level vision. Mr. Kulpa graduated from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

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The Disrespectful Nature Of My Generation Needs To Stop

Why choosing phone games over a Holocaust survivor was my breaking point.

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While many students that attended Holocaust survivor Hershel Greenblat's talk were rightfully attentive, I noticed, out of the corner of my eye, a few outlier students tapping away on their phones. They were minute movements, but inappropriate nonetheless.

Immediately I became infuriated. How, I thought, fuming, did my generation become so blithely unaware to the point where we could not proffer basic respect to a survivor of one of the most horrific events in human history?

Perhaps the students were just texting their parents, telling them that the event would run a bit long. 10 minutes later, my eyes diverted from Greenblat back to the students. They were still on their phones. This time, I could see the screens being held horizontally—indicating a game or a show was being played. I wanted to get up, smack the distractions out of their hands, and ask them why they thought what they were doing was more important than a Holocaust speaker.

I will not waste any more time writing about the disrespectful few. Because they could not give Greenblat the time of their day, I will not give them mine. Instead, I want to focus on a massive trend my generation has mistakenly indulged ourselves in.

The Greenblat incident is only an example of this phenomenon I find so confusing. From young, it was instilled in me, probably via Chinese tradition, that elders should be respected. It is a title only revoked when unacceptable behavior allows it to be, and is otherwise maintained. I understand that not everybody comes from a background where respect is automatically granted to people. And I see that side of the story.

Why does age automatically warrant respect? It is the fact that they have made it this far, and have interesting stories to tell. There are exceptions, perhaps more than there are inclusions.

But this fact can be determined by the simple act of offering an elderly person your seat on public transportation. Sure, it can be for their health, but within that simple act is a meaningful sacrifice for somebody who has experienced more than you.

Age aside, at Greenblat's talk, majority of the disrespect shown might not have been agist. Instead, it could have been the behavior students just there for the check-in check-out extra credit that multiple classes and clubs were offering. While my teachers who advertised the event stressed the importance of attendance not just for the academic boost, but for the experience, I knew that some of the more distracted students there must have been those selfish, ignorant, solely academic driven cockalorums.

I stay hopeful because majority of my classmates were attentive. We knew to put aside our Chromebooks, regardless of note-taking, and simply listen to what Greenblat had to offer.

It would be wrong to label my generation as entitled— that's a misnomer for the generation before. We are still wavering between the line of automatic respect and earned respect, but we need to set a line for people whom we know the stories of. Especially a Holocaust survivor.

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