8 Reasons Millennials Are The Worst

8 Reasons Millennials Are The Worst

We're only wasting our money on avocado toast.
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Researchers Neil Howe and William Strauss labeled those born between 1982 and 2004 as millennials and deemed us as "the next great generation." Despite all the hate we get from older generations, I think we deserve this title. Here are my eight reasons why we're better than they make us seem.

1. We're lazy.

According to the World Economic Forum studies, Millennials are actually more likely to become workaholics than the generations before us.

The Forum interviewed almost 6,000 people about their attitudes concerning taking time off work. Those who did not take off and use their earned vacation times were termed "work martyrs."

The Forum reported that “more than four in 10 (43%) of work martyrs are millennials, compared to just 29% of overall respondents.”

The study also showed nearly 25 percent of millennials forfeited their earned holiday days compared to the 19 and 17 percent of Gen X and Baby Boomers.

2. We're obsessed with technology.

From watching television to checking your phone or email, these are the statistics that a Nielson study came up with about ages most distracted by technology.

"Well...that's just for television and work. Millennials are the ones obsessed with their phones and social media! " Check the facts. The majority of compulsive social media checkers are adults---with the highest usage observed in those between the ages of 25 and 54.

Yeah, you read that right.

3. We really don't care about politics.

A short survey right before the latest presidential election showed that millennials weren't uninterested in the election...they were just worried about different things. In fact, millennials are most interested in education, healthcare, and–believe it or not–the economy.

Millennials around the world are also becoming some of the youngest to get involved. Take Wyat Roy, Mhairi Black, and Justin Chennette for just a few examples.



Wyat Roy, who at 20 years old took the title of the youngest elected Australian parliamentarian member ever, is now Australia's Assistant Minister for Innovation. He has proved time and time again that his youth will not stop him from making a difference.


Mhairi Black, the current "Baby of the House" as the youngest member in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, endorses Women Against State Pension Inequality and went viral after her speech about the failing welfare system and the need for food banks in Scotland.

Justin Chennette is currently the youngest member of the Maine Senate. He had previously served two terms in the Maine House of Representatives and today is the ranking member of the Taxation Committee




All three of these millennial politicians are pillars that prove millennials can and are involved–and want to make a difference in this world.


4. We're total narcissists.

I think it's safe to say millennials would stick their neck out for others more than most people think. Here are just three reasons why:

Priyanka Chopra, an Indian actress, is a millennial advocating for child and woman rights around the globe. She is a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador who travels to places like Zimbabwe to combat sexual violence against children. She not only puts her own life in danger but bases almost her entire existence on getting equal rights for those who can't fight themselves.

Despite gunfire, a 20-year-old intern, Daniel Hernandez Jr. was a hero when he risked his life for a shot and wounded Representative Gabrielle Giffords. Later, he became an advocate for gun control and safety and is now wanting to continue becoming involved in politics to make for a better America.

Lastly, Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook and perhaps the most famous millennial, announced that he and his wife were going to donate 99 percent–yes, 99 percent–of their Facebook shares to causes that will help make this world a better place for children like their daughter, Max. Their goal is "to promote equality for all children in next generation."

5. We're just copies of each other.

"Meet one...meet them all. Millennials are all the same." Wrong.

In the United States, Millennials are the most ethnically and racially diverse generation. That's pretty dang cool. In fact, over 40 percent of American Millennials are nonwhite or hispanic.



What's more? Millennials were surveyed and found to be more accepting and welcoming of immigrants and diversity here in the U.S. of A.

We fight every day to combat the one-size-fits-all ideology. We embrace difference and push against conformity. Millennials want all shapes, colors, sex, and beliefs to be accepted–and we aren't afraid to tell you.

Bye, bye, stereotypes.

6. We're only wasting our money on avocado toast.

Contrary to popular belief, millennials are actually really good at saving and taking care of their money. In fact, TD Ameritrade's recent study should encourage those depending on millennials for financial support. The study shows we have a pretty good comprehension of how our finances work.

Compared to the 41 percent of Americans who have a working budget, it has been reported that 80 percent of working millennials maintain and follow one. More than half of us have an emergency fund, and 72 percent are saving for retirement. Not a bad trend if you ask me.

7. We won't change the world.

Millennials aren't making a positive difference? Really? Read the stories of Malala Yousafzai and Sonita Alizadeh and tell me if you still think this.

Malala Yousafzai, the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize recipient, is known for her open defiance of the Taliban. She demanded girls receive education and was rewarded by a bullet to the face. Before you finish that gasp--just wait. Her story was not over, and neither was her fight. After recovering, Malala continued advocating equal rights and speaks globally to promote education for girls around the world.

Documentaries and movies have since been made about her amazing life and fight, helping spread and build awareness for her amazing story.



Another millennial famous for her defiance to a cultural norm is Sonita Alizadeh. Sonita's story began to catch global attention after she released her rap "Brides for Sale" that spoke against the practice of Afghan families selling their daughters to men looking for brides.

She recorded her rap in Iran, another risky move since it is illegal for women to sing aloud there. After an Iranian filmmaker picked up her story and began making a documentary about her escape of this marriage practice, Sonita moved to the United States for school on full scholarship. She has performed at the International Women for Courage conference in D.C and continues writing music to spread awareness of this unequal practice.

8. We don't genuinely care about education.

A separate study from the above results showed that, although still a relatively low percentage, Millennials are the most educated generation coming in at 34 percent with a bachelor's degree.

To wrap this up...

I guess the last thought I have to offer is an open note to the generations before us-hose who are so quick to judge and use the term "millennial" in such a negative way...

With all respect, I ask that you consider one thing: if you don't like us---if you don't like what our generation is---think about who raised us.

Cover Image Credit: Lauren Elizabeth / YouTube

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To The Girl Who Had A Plan

A letter to the girl whose life is not going according to her plan.
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“I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.” - William Ernest Henley

Since we were little girls we have been asked, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” We responded with astronauts, teachers, presidents, nurses, etc. Then we start growing up, and our plans change.

In middle school, our plans were molded based on our friends and whatever was cool at the time. Eventually, we went to high school and this question became serious, along with some others: “What are your plans for college?” “What are you going to major in?” “When do you think you’ll get married?” “Are you going to stay friends with your friends?” We are bombarded with these questions we are supposed to have answers to, so we start making plans.

Plans, like going to college with our best friends and getting a degree we’ve been dreaming about. Plans, to get married as soon as we can. We make plans for how to lose weight and get healthy. We make plans for our weddings and children.

SEE ALSO: 19 Pieces Of Advice From A Soon-To-Be 20-Year-Old

We fill our Pinterest boards with these dreams and hopes that we have, which are really great things to do, but what happens when you don’t get into that college? What happens when your best friend chooses to go somewhere else? Or, what if you don’t get the scholarship you need or the awards you thought you deserved. Maybe, the guy you thought you would marry breaks your heart. You might gain a few pounds instead of losing them. Your parents get divorced. Someone you love gets cancer. You don’t get the grades you need. You don’t make that collegiate sports team. The sorority you’re a legacy to, drops you. You didn’t get the job or internship you applied for. What happens to you when this plan doesn’t go your way?

I’ve been there.

The answer for that is “I have this hope that is an anchor for my soul.” Soon we all realize we are not the captain of our fate. We don’t have everything under control nor will we ever have control of every situation in our lives. But, there is someone who is working all things together for the good of those who love him, who has a plan and a purpose for the lives of his children. His name is Jesus. When life takes a turn you aren’t expecting, those are the times you have to cling to Him the tightest, trusting that His plan is what is best. That is easier said than done, but keep pursuing Him. I have found in my life that His plans were always better than mine, and slowly He’s revealing that to me.

The end of your plan isn’t the end of your life. There is more out there. You may not be the captain of your fate, but you can be the master of your soul. You can choose to be happy despite your circumstances. You can change directions at any point and go a different way. You can take the bad and make something beautiful out of it, if you allow God to work in your heart.

SEE ALSO: To The Girl Patiently Waiting With An Impatient Heart

So, make the best of that school you did get in to. Own it. Make new friends- you may find they are better than the old ones. Apply for more scholarships, or get a job. Move on from the guy that broke your heart; he does not deserve you. God has a guy lined up for you who will love you completely. Spend all the time you can with the loved one with cancer. Pray, pray hard for healing. Study more. Apply for more jobs, or try to spend your summer serving others instead. Join a different club or get involved in other organizations on campus. Find your delight first in God and then pursue other activities that make you happy; He will give you the desires of your heart.

My friend, it is going to be OK.

Cover Image Credit: Megan Beavers Photography

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If You Don't Actually Live In Chicago, Stop Saying You Do

Chicago natives only.

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If you call the Sears Tower, the "Willis Tower" then you are not from Chicago. If you have no intellect on the colloquial language or slang that is used in Chicago, then you are not from Chicago. If the CTA was not your primary form of transportation at some point in your life, then you are not from Chicago. If you have never seen a chair in a parking space, or personally put out a chair to save your shoveled parking spot in the winter, then you are not from Chicago.

If your address does not include: 606, Chicago, IL then you are not from Chicago!!!!

I have heard a lot of suburbanites complain about how adamant Chicagoans are about not letting them say they are from Chicago. I understand that if you are from a small town that nobody has ever heard of, it might be easier to say that you are from Chicago, but we both know that isn't true. Instead, say that you live x amount of hours away from the city. The reason that Chicagoans become so upset when people not from the city say that they are, is so much bigger than we simply don't like sharing our city. I agree Chicago is an amazing place, and I couldn't imagine growing up anywhere else, but by claiming that you are from Chicago, when in fact you are not, you are discrediting the hardships and experiences that people from the city endure.

Living in Chicago comes with a lot of good things, but it also comes with a lot of bad, as well. Those who grew up in the suburbs will never understand what living in the city is actually like unless they have experienced it themselves. I am a Chicago Public School alumni and was in the system from preschool all the way to high school senior. In all of my fourteen years of being a CPS student, funding to keep school doors open has been a consistent problem. There have been countless times that the Chicago Teachers Union has threatened to go on strike for better wages and condition. There also have always been plenty of times that they actually have gone on strike costing students valuable class time that could have been avoided if CPS properly funded their employees and schools. School closings are also not uncommon in the city and they happen predominantly in low-income neighborhoods. The system makes it even more difficult for people in the hood to make better lives for themselves through education by limiting their access to education.

Quality education is hard to come by in the city and is permitted to a very lucky few. It is a real problem and a battle that suburban kids are oblivious to because having access to quality education is something they would never think twice about.

The fight for quality education is just one thing of many that suburbans will never understand. They could never fathom the thought of not being able to go to a certain area because it isn't safe. They couldn't think of having to help their friends grieve over another life taken from gun violence. They will never understand that we say "be safe" to everyone we say "goodbye" to because you never know when the dangers of the city will affect you next. They couldn't imagine seeing their families and friends uprooted from their longtime homes because gentrification has finally affected their neighborhood to the point that they can't afford to live there anymore.

Chicago to suburbans is a fun train ride downtown to go shopping on Magnificent Mile and visit the bean. It's taking pictures for their Instagram at a new coffee shop up north. It's going to the beach and playing beach volleyball. My city is so much more than that. My city is murals and art all over the building walls, and corner stores on every other block and dancing to house music all night long. My city hearing fireworks a month before and after the Fourth of July. My city is cultural festivals all summer long and driving down Lake Shore Drive with music blasting. My city is having the option to eat at Portillo's, Ricobene's or Connie's. Suburbans will never know my city so stop saying that you are from Chicago and act as if you do. It's about time that suburbans stop appropriating a culture that they have no idea even exists.

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